Giuseppe Zocchi

(17111767 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Giuseppe Zocchi
ZOCCHI Giuseppe A View Of The Piazza Della Santissima Annunziata, Florence, With The Ospedale Degli Innocenti

Christie's /Dec 4, 2012
743,614.15 - 991,485.53
919,671.09

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Artworks in Arcadja
78

Some works of Giuseppe Zocchi

Extracted between 78 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Giuseppe Zocchi - Landscape With Figures By An Equestrian Statue

Giuseppe Zocchi - Landscape With Figures By An Equestrian Statue

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Lot number: 593
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Giuseppe Zocchi (Florence 1711–1767) Landscape with figures by an equestrian statue, oil on canvas, 55 x 33.5 cm, framed Provenance: Marchese Andrea Gerini, Florence Literature: M. Gregori, Maestri della Pittura Italiana III, Florence 2009, pp. 43–46; C. Sisi/R. Spinelli, Il Fasto e la Ragione Arte del Settecenti a Firenze, Giunti, Prato 2009, p. 248-249, fig. 89 Exhibited: Florence, Uffizi Gallery, Il fasto e la Ragione, Arte del Settecento a Firenze, 30 May-30 September 2009 Print: Cosimo Zocchi, engraved 1769, published by A. Tosi, Giuseppe Zocchi e la Toscana del Settecento, p. 279, Le Monnier, Florence, 1997 The present painting dates from after 1750 and an etching made by Giuseppe’’’’s brother Cosimo in 1769 reproduces the painting in counterpart and locates it in the gallery of Zocchi’’’’s main patron, the Marquis Andrea Gerini (see ill.). The light falls from the left and illuminates the scene where the figures are set under monumental sculpture. The landscape on the left in the background portrays ancient Roman ruins and evokes the painter’’’’s stay in Rome. In this painting Zocchi was probably inspired by Panini, but demonstrates his personality in the rendering of atmosphere and the accurate depiction of the people and ruins. Besides being a landscapist, the Florentine Giuseppe Zocchi was also an excellent and wide-ranging painter of figures and frescoes. While his career started under the supervision of Ranieri del Pace, he later came into contact with the Marquis Andrea Gerini who enabled him to travel and study. Between the end of the 1730s and the beginning of the 1740s, he visited Venice, Milan, Bologna, and Rome, acquiring cultural influences. After a time in Canaletto’’’’s workshop, his landscapes, especially those of Florence, immediately became famous and requested. Besides these, Giuseppe dedicated himself to the more imaginative and fascinating genre of landscapes with ruins. His Roman and Venetian experiences were foundational and the influence of the works of Marco Ricci, Panini and Locatelli are visible in the present composition. additional picture: Cosimo Zocchi, Engraving after the painting by Giuseppe Zocchi, Biblioteca Marucelliana, Florence (1769)
Giuseppe Zocchi - Villa Della Luna D'elli Ss Mar. Guadagni

Giuseppe Zocchi - Villa Della Luna D'elli Ss Mar. Guadagni

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Lot number: 143
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Joseph Zocchi (Giuseppe Zocchi, 1711-1767): Villa Della Luna d'elli SS Mar. Guadagni ; and Villa Del Sig. Marchese Bartolini a Rovezzano Two engravings with hand-coloring; together with I.C. Dehne: Palazzo del N.H. Sagredo , engraving with hand-coloring. Pair 12 x 19 1/4 in. (plate), 19 x 26 in. (frame); and 12 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (sight), 21 x 16 1/2 in. (frame). Estimate $ 300-500
Giuseppe Zocchi - View Of Rome With The Colosseum From The Palatine Hill

Giuseppe Zocchi - View Of Rome With The Colosseum From The Palatine Hill

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Lot number: 26
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Lot Description Giuseppe Zocchi (Florence 1711-1767) View of Rome with the Colosseum from the Palatine Hill black chalk and grey, brown and yellow wash, on two joined sheets, each sheet with fragmentary armorial watermark 8 7/8 x 20¼ in. (22.5 x 51.3 cm.) Provenance From an album of drawings made by the artist for Sir Horace Mann, British Envoy to Florence, circa 1764; By descent to Mrs Doris Ray Courtney Herbert, South Africa; The album dismembered and the individual drawings sold; Sotheby's, London, 11 July 1979, this drawing lot 222. Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, Monaco, 13 June 1982, lot 140. Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 6 July 1987, lot 62. Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 3 July 1996, lot 142. The Unicorno Collection; Sotheby's, Amsterdam, 19 May 2004, lot 173, where acquired by the present owner. View Lot Notes > Lot Notes Sir Horace Mann (1706-1786) was appointed as secretary to the British Minister at Florence in 1737 and made his home in the city for the rest of his life, establishing a distinguished career for himself as British Envoy. His hospitality to fellow British residents in Florence was widely appreciated and he is among the connoisseurs represented in Zoffany's Tribuna of the Uffizi (1772-1778), standing on the right. The album from which this drawing comes, assembled in 1764 by Zocchi for Mann, contained views of several Italian cities including Rome and Florence. According to the 1982 sale catalogue, the original mount identified the view as having been taken from the Villa Farnese.
Giuseppe Zocchi - A View Of The Piazza Della Santissima Annunziata, Florence, With The Ospedale Degli Innocenti

Giuseppe Zocchi - A View Of The Piazza Della Santissima Annunziata, Florence, With The Ospedale Degli Innocenti

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Gross Price
Lot number: 54
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Giuseppe Zocchi (near Florence 1711/7-1767 Florence) A view of the Piazza della Santissima Annunziata, Florence, with the Ospedale degli Innocenti oil on canvas 22½ x 34½ in. (57.2 x 87.7 cm.) Samuel Ware (1781-1860), Hendon Hall, and by descent through his nephew and heir, C.N. Cumberlege-Ware, to Mrs. R.M. Cumberlege-Ware; (+), Christie's, 27 June 1975, lot 48, as Bernardo Bellotto (40,000 gns. to the husband of the present owner). THE PROPERTY OF A LADY M. Gregori and S. Blasio, Firenze nella Pittura e nel disegno dal Trecento al Settecento, San Miniato, 1994, pp. 192-3, figs. 248 and 213, note 76, as Zocchi. Engraved as 'Veduta della Piazza della SS Nunziata, Statua Equestre di Ferdinando Primo, Fonti e Loggie Laterali', plate XIV in Zocchi's Scelta di XXIV vedute delle principali contrade, piazza, chiese e palazzo della città di Firenze, 1744. This picture is by the most accomplished Tuscan topographical artist of the mid-eighteenth century. Trained in Florence, Giuseppe Zocchi was enabled by his patron, Marchese Andrea Gerini (1691-1766) to travel extensively in Italy. His reputation rests on the small group of Florentine views to which this canvas belongs, and on three sequences of engravings after his views of Florence and of villas in Tuscany published in 1744 and 1757. This oblique view of the Piazza Santissima Annunziata is framed on the left by the last house on the west side of the Via dei Servi, beyond which are seven bays of the portico of the Confraternita dei Servi di San Marco, built by Antonio da Sangallo the elder and Baccio d'Agnolo in 1516-25 in emulation of that of the Spedale degli Innocenti, seen in shadow on the right, which was designed by Brunelleschi and built between 1419 and 1426. Ahead is the portico of the church of Santissima Annunziata which was begun by Michelozzo: the central bay of the portico was designed by Antonio Manetti, who was strongly influenced by Leon Battista Alberti and constructed the tribuna, the top of which is shown, in 1447: the lateral bays of the portico were added by G.B. Caccani in 1599-1601. In the piazza are shown the equestrian monument to Grand Duke Ferdinand I of Tuscany, completed by Ferdinando Tacca in 1608, and the pair of bronze fountains supplied by the latter to the design of Bernardino Redi in 1629. The portico and piazza were clearly intended to be approached frontally down the Via dei Servi, but Zocchi, whose visit to Venice had familiarised him with the approach to topography evolved by Canaletto and also practised by Marieschi, clearly understood that an oblique approach would be visually more satisfactory. Like Canaletto he no doubt used a mechanical device to record the details of the topography from more than one viewpoint, but the results were carefully fused. The corner of the house on the Via dei Servi is recorded, wholly accurately, from a position some yards down that street. The relative position of the equestrian statue and the loggia of the Confraternita were taken from the westernmost window on the first floor of the building across the road, now the hotel Due Fontane: while the portico of the church is seen from ground level from a position to the east of the same building. Zocchi's engraving corresponds in composition, but the implied viewpoint is somewhat further back and the details of the figures and the carriage differ: the original drawing for this is in the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York (Gregori and Blasio, p. 180, fig. 223). On the basis of the illustration in the 1975 sale catalogue, Gregori and Blasio fairly comment that this is perhaps the picture in which Zocchi is closest to Canaletto 'per la forza delle ombre' and to Marieschi 'per la chiarità e la nitidezza del campo'. More recently Bozena Kowalczyk has established that the young Bellotto was in Florence at the invitation of Marchese Gerini in the summer of 1740 (op. cit., p. 24): the pictures that resulted from this visit, now at Budapest and Russborough, were evidently studied closely by Zocchi as is seen in this picture, which is presumably of 1740-1, as in his manuscript 'Vita di pittori, 1719-41 circa' Francesco Maria Niccolò Gabburri, who died in 1742, mentions pictures by Zocchi 'nel gusto del Celebre Canaletto' (cf. Gregori and Blasio, p. 190) and more specifically referred to 'diverse vedute a olio, delle quali in buon numero ne ha fatte in disegno che presentemente stanno intagliandosi in rame da varii primary intagliatori' (cf. B.A. Kowalczyk, 'Bellotto and Zanetti in Florence', The Burlington Magazine, CLIV, January 2012, pp. 28-9). This picture was indeed both designed and executed by Zocchi, while the print was copied from it by a professional engraver. Entitled 'Veduta della Piazza della SS Nunziata, Statua Equestre di Ferdinando Primo, Fonti e Loggie Laterali', this was published as plate XIV in Zocchi's Scelta di XXIV vedute delle principali contrade, piazza, chiese e palazzi della città di Firenze of 1744. By an odd coincidence Bellotto painted six views of Florence (see, most recently, Kowalczyk, loc. cit.): and this is one of six pictures by Zocchi recorded by Gregori and Blasio. Of these, two were supplied to the artist's main patron, Marchese Andrea Gerini (The Piazza della Signoria, sold at Sotheby's, and Florence from the Porta San Niccolò, Gregori and Blasio, figs. 250 and 249); while three others were owned by Conte Galli Tassi (the Ponte Santa Trinita and the Piazza San Firenze sold in these Rooms, 10 July 1981, and, probably, a View of the Arno with the Ponte Santa Trinita, in the Thyssen Collection, op. cit., figs. 252, 247 and 251). The first recorded owner of this picture, the architect Samuel Ware, was the son of a leather-merchant and became a student at the Royal Academy in 1800. He worked for the Duke of Devonshire both at Chatsworth and Lismore and designed the Burlington Arcade. He undertook alterations at Northumberland House for the Duke of Northumberland and managed the London property of the 4th Duke of Portland. He built up a considerable fortune, acquiring Hendon Hall, which he rebuilt and which passed on his death to his nephew, C.N. Cumberlege, who also maintained his architectural practice.
Giuseppe Zocchi - Architectural Capriccio

Giuseppe Zocchi - Architectural Capriccio

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Lot number: 831
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Giuseppe Zocchi (Florence 1711 – 1767) Architectural capriccio, oil on canvas, 98 x 74 cm, framed Provenance: European private collection We are grateful to Giancarlo Sestieri (written communication) for confirming the present attribution. Sestieri underlines the close affinity between the present painting and the Paesaggio con rovine (Florence, Museo dell’’’’Opificio delle Pietre Dure), especially in the way the painter has executed marble surfaces and figural types. He also compares the present work to other works by the artist (see A. Tosi, Inventare la realtà. Giuseppe Zocchi e la Toscana del Settecento, pp. 139 - 145, 170 -171, 242 - 245, 254 – 263). Various elements of the real world are represented in this capriccio architettonico, the artist interpreting them in a new way. An example is the church tower of Santa Francesca Romana in the Roman Campo Vaccino, which shows the influence of the inventive style of Giovanni Paolo Panini. Zocchi, however, employs a distinctive use of colour and pictorial texture. Specialist: Mark MacDonnell
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