Liu Ye

(1964 ) - Artworks
LIU YE Hans Christian Andersen In The Snow

Sotheby's /Dec 1, 2013
426,404.02 - 548,233.74
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
266

Some works of Liu Ye

Extracted between 266 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Liu Ye - Blackboard

Liu Ye - Blackboard

Original 2007
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Lot number: 509
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LIU YE (Chinese, B. 1964) Blackboard dated '07' (lower left) acrylic on canvas 60 x 45 cm. (23 5/8 x 17 3/4 in.) Painted in 2007 Johnen + Schoettle Gallery, Cologne, Germany Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007 Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation, China Facing Reality, Vienna, Austria, 2008 (listed, p. 160 and illustated in an attached postcard). Cologne, Germany, Johnen + Schoettler Gallery, Liu Ye Infatuation, 23 June - 21 August 2007. Vienna, Austria, Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation Vienna, China Facing Reality, 26 October 2007 - 10 February 2008.
Liu Ye - Red, Yellow, Blue

Liu Ye - Red, Yellow, Blue

Original 2002
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Lot number: 628
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Liu Ye (Chinese, b.1964) Red, Yellow, Blue Oil on canvas, triptych, framed Each signed in Chinese and English and dated 2002 45 x 180 cm. (17 11/16 x 70 7/8 in). Each 45 x 60 cm. (17 11/16 x 23 5/8 in). (3). Footnotes Provenance: Schoeni Art Gallery, Hong Kong Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Exhibited: 'Liu Ye:Red Yellow Blue', Schoeni Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 8 January to 14 January 2004 Published: Hilary Binks, Liu Ye: Red Yellow Blue , Schoeni Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 2004, p. 40-41 This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and issued by Schoeni Art Gallery. 劉野 紅、黃、藍 油彩畫布 鏡框(三聯作) 二〇〇二年作 簽名:2002 野 Liu Ye 來源: 香港少勵畫廊 現藏家購自上述畫廊 展覽:「劉野:紅黃藍」,香港少勵畫廊,2004年1月8日至1月14日 出版:Hilary Binks,《劉野:紅黃藍》,香港少勵畫廊,2004年,頁40-41 此作品附藝術家簽署香港少勵畫廊證書 Liu Ye is one of the most important artists on the contemporary Chinese art scene. His aesthetics and motives are completely unique and stand out from the ones of his contemporaries. He is seen by the younger generation of Chinese artists as the 'father' of the cartoon movement. There is a wealth of influences that led him to develop the series of works representing children and including Mondrian paintings. The artist acknowledges the visual culture of cartoons, and the inspiration he drew notably from the films of Hayao Miyasaki and the drawings of Dick Bruna. The style he constructed results from blending many aspects of his personal experiences. Liu Ye grew up under the Cultural Revolution and was exposed to propaganda images, which colour schemes, according to him, plays a part in this series of works. The realm of fairy tales was omnipresent, through his father's work, an author of children books, and his collection of Chinese and foreign fairy tales books. Liu Ye's passion and artistic skills were expressed from an early age on. As a child he would sequester himself and draw to master his emotions or deal with a situation. He maintains his attitude still; through his choice of topics, he deliberately distances himself from current events. This distance gives access to a more objective perspective. It allows the artist to focus on more profound, less fleeting subjects, such as human emotions. Liu Ye's works are suspended in time and space, they are not directly related to reality but rather to the artist's personal experience of the times. During the 1989 events, Liu Ye was studying in Germany; he was not affected in the same way as his contemporaries. There are no "collective images" in his paintings. Individualism was then developing in China; Liu Ye was exploring it, his works focused on the self and its psyche. The artist feels a sense of duty in rendering basic human feelings. They are infused with the enjoyment of art, his own and that of the viewer. His works focus on the visual experience, not on representation, hence the presence of Mondrian's paintings in Liu Ye's. Objects, characters are present as parts of a composition that is staged. There is a sense of absurdity, of comedy in his works. His paintings create a space open for interpretation, between the familiar and the disturbing, between fantasy and an abstracted reality. Because of the presence of these objects the viewer feels an intimacy, however tension, even as a tease, is looming. The iconic motif of Mondrian's paintings inside Liu Ye's paintings, goes beyond homage and the simple citation of the famous Western painter. On the one hand, Mondrian's paintings are included in Liu Ye's works in light of the serenity that derives from their purity and abstraction. On the other, to the artist they also evoke an ecstatic pain coming from the very act of tracing design, an ambivalence Liu Ye experienced when training in industrial design. Technical design was difficult to achieve, but its machine-like perfection, its serene austerity was rewarding. According to Liu Ye, this technique is aligned with Mondrian's works to illustrate the control of passion. Liu Ye's works originate in a blend of his imaginative childhood and the rationality of his training as a teenager. Objects and characters are part of his visual realm and memories. Balance of composition is at the core of his work and he also finds a graceful balance and purity in Mondrian's works. For Liu Ye, a true achievement is to render something in which the essence is highly elaborate in the simplest of (visual) languages. Growing up, his favorite coloured pencils were the three primary colours this work is titled after: Red, Yellow and Blue. The respective connotations of these colours were the sun and national flag for red, sunflower and sunlight for yellow and ocean and sky for blue. Red can also be associated with blood and the girl holding a knife is a clear reminder of that. In the yellow painting the girl is pointing at something outside of the painting, maybe to the girl in the red work, and in the last piece, in blue, the girl seems to be lost in contemplation, not of the Mondrian though. Girls depicted from behind are also a common feature of Liu Ye's works, just like girls holding swords or knives or other potentially harmful objects, such as a whip. This triptych is highly representative of the artist's works. This work was exhibited at Schoeni Art Gallery in Beijing in 2003 and in Liu Ye's first solo show in Hong Kong, also at Schoeni Art Gallery, in 2004. In the gallery publication, titled Red, Yellow and Blue , the artist stated "I have an equal passion for fairy tales and philosophy". 劉野是中國當代藝壇其中一位最重要的藝術家,他的美學概念、創作動機都是獨一無異和傲視同儕的。他被中國年青一代的藝術家視為「卡通運動」 之父。 他曾接受過多方面的薰陶和影響,因而能夠創作出一系列關於小孩和蒙特里安的畫作。 他極之欣賞卡通的視覺文化,宮崎駿的電影和廸克布魯納的畫對他創作風格的影響很大,再加上他多方面個人體驗,形成他箇有的風格。 劉野於文化大革命成長,期間不少宣傳圖像的顏色對這系列的作品具深遠影響。他父親是位兒童書籍的作家,所以擁有很多中外童話故事書, 而這些都對劉野的創作有深厚的影響,加了一份童話的感性。 劉野的藝術天份和對藝術的熱誠從小就表露出,每當他要處理一些情緒和情況之時,他會把自己關起來,藉畫畫去解決問題。為了有更客觀的看法, 他會保持中立態度,刻意將自己從現實狀況中抽離。這樣他便可以專注於更有深度的題材,例如人類的情感,而少注意一些短暫的事物。 劉野的作品是固定在某時間和空間之內,不直接與現實有關,反映出藝術家對這個時代和人性的體悟。1989 年在中國所發生的一切, 劉野正在德國唸書所以沒有像他的同輩受到同樣的沖擊。他的作品沒有「併圖式的畫面」,後來劉野開始探索中國正發展的個人主義, 專注於自己精神上的表達,抒發出人類最基本的情感。他的作品注重視覺的感受, 而並非其代表的意義,因而他的作品包含了蒙特里安的畫作, 洋溢他自己及賞畫人享受藝術的快樂。他所描繪的物件和人物都只是構圖的一部份,加上抽象和滑稽的元素,讓觀眾有無限的想像空間, 游走於熟悉與困惑、幻想與現實之間。由於這些物件都是為人熟悉的,所以賞畫的人會有親切感,但張力亦不少,開玩笑時也帶一點陰暗。 劉野的作品加入蒙特里安的畫作不僅是對這位西方著名的畫家致敬,亦非無的放矢。一方面, 劉野看到蒙特里安既清純又抽象的特色可藉此帶出箇中寧謐的感覺。另一方面,他經歷過工業設計訓練,所以繪畫時會湧現矛盾。 要做到出色的技術繪圖設計很困難,浸淫在機械式的完美需要寧靜而艱苦的鍛鍊,但那種成就感是無可比擬。劉野挪用蒙特里安的畫, 描繪出對情緒的控制。 劉野的作品結合了童年時豐富的幻想力和青少年受訓時的理性鍛鍊,物件和人物都是他的視覺和記憶空間裡的一部份。他的作品講求結構上的平衡, 所以特別喜歡蒙特里安作品的平衡美和清純感。劉野認為最大的成就是可以用最簡化的視覺語言去表達最深層的重點意念。成長中, 他最喜歡最基本的紅、 黃、藍色因為它們分別擁有深層次意義:紅色代表太陽和國旗、黃色代表太陽花和陽光、藍色代表海洋和天空。紅色也象徵血, 拿刀的女孩正是很明顯的例子。而黃色的畫,女孩指向畫外的一些東西,可能是指向紅色的畫作。最後藍色的畫作,女孩似乎是失落於沈思的世界裡, 而並非蒙特里安的畫裡。這系列的作品有很多劉野作品非常典型的元素,如小女孩的背面、拿劍或刀的女孩、或是拿著其他具攻擊性物件的女孩。 所以這三聯作是劉野最具代表性的作品之一。 這三幅作品曾經於2003 年北京少勵畫廊《紅、黃、藍》展出,之後2004 年再度在香港少勵畫廊展出, 是劉野首次在香港舉行的個人畫展。 藝術家在此展覽的圖錄中表示:「我對童話故事的熱誠, 跟對哲學的追求同樣狂熱。」
Liu Ye - Mondrian, Dick Bruna And I

Liu Ye - Mondrian, Dick Bruna And I

Original 2003
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Lot number: 34
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Liu Ye (b. 1964) Mondrian, Dick Bruna and I signed in Chinese; signed 'Liu Ye' in Pinyin; dated '2003' (lower right); titled in Chinese (on the reverse) acrylic and oil on canvas 120 x 80 cm. (47 1/4 x 31 1/2 in.) Painted in 2003 劉野 蒙德里安、迪克. 布魯納和我 丙烯 油彩 畫布 2003年作 簽名:野 Liu Ye Schoeni Art Gallery, Hong Kong, China Christie's, Hong Kong, 24 November 2012, Lot 36 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Schoeni Art Gallery Ltd., Hong Kong, Liu Ye: Red Yellow Blue ,exh. cat., Hong Kong, China, 2003 (illustrated, p. 14) Beijing, China, Schoeni Art Gallery Beijing/Hong Kong, China, Schoeni Art Gallery Hong Kong, Liu Ye: Red Yellow Blue (Traveling Exhibition), November 2003-January 2004.
Liu Ye - Hans Christian Andersen In The Snow

Liu Ye - Hans Christian Andersen In The Snow

Original 2005
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Lot number: 110
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Provenance Private Collection, China Exhibited USA, New York, Liu Ye: Temptations, Sperone Westwater, 14 September to 28 October 2006 Switzerland, Bern, Liu Ye, Kunstmuseum Bern, 7 February to 1 April 2007 110 Liu Ye B. 1964 HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN IN THE SNOW signed in Chinese and Pinyin and dated 05; titled in English and dated 2005 on the reverse acrylic and oil on canvas diameter: 79.8cm.; 31 3/8 in. Estimate 3,500,000 - 4,500,000 RMB Print Please notify me when the condition report is available
Liu Ye - Oh!

Liu Ye - Oh!

Original 1999
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Lot number: 404
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Description:
Lot Description Liu Ye (B. 1964) Oh! signed in Chinese; signed 'LIU YE' in Pinyin; dated '99' (lower right) oil on canvas 38 x 38 cm. (14 7/8 x 14 7/8 in.) Painted in 1999 刘野 啊呀! 油彩 画布 1999年作 签名︰野;LIU YE View Lot Notes > Lot Notes Liu Ye's work has always wandered between mythology and philosophy, guided sometimes toward one or the other but always remaining within the space of his creation, such that these elements, processed by the hand of the artist, become highly individual works. Born in 1964, Liu grew up in an intellectual family and came into contact with classical art at an early age. In his youth he received a foundational education in art and design, beginning to think through the fundamental elements of painting through the work of Kandinsky, Mondrian and others. In 1986 he was accepted into the mural department of the Central Academy of Fine Art, and in 1990 continued his studies at the fine arts college of the Berlin University of the Arts. Executed in 1991, Studio (Lot 406) makes formal reference to the work of Jan van Eyck: a figure holding a cigarette in one hand stands in the studio, his gaze fixed on something beyond the frame. Here Liu Ye, like Pieter Bruegel the Elder in The Painter and the Connoisseur, inserts himself into the picture holding a palette and brace, his sculptural, naked torso 'candidly' facing the viewer while his hand hesitantly points. The viewer is held in place by the deep stares of these two figures; time in the studio stands still as if the viewer were a third figure in the painting. Liu depicts the window frame, walls and other architectural elements as geometric shapes, accentuating the combination of horizontal and vertical lines through shifts in light. Within this space it is dim but outside the window the light is vivid, suggesting a sense of melancholy that pervades the work. The artist utilises a tranquil mode of depiction to powerfully call forth this riddle. Art is the epitome of its age and a prism through which to view reality. Under the guise of rationality and order, Liu's work employs whimsical narrative to realise his focus on this reality. In Angel (Lot 405), the artist stages a narrative theatrical set within a scene that seems to resemble a real space, a chaotic space into which light seeps through an open door and clear glass windows to the left. A profusion of detailed elements crowd the composition, keeping the viewer overwhelmed with constant motion. It is a studio, but also seems like a stage. Human and equine figures resembling both classical sculpture and dramatic characters appear in the work; the mood is solemn and peaceful, but the appearance of Andy Warhol and a portrait of Mao bring discomfort and contradiction to the otherwise tranquil space. Standing in the farthest space of the composition is an angel who seems to reference Botticelli, further complicating the picture with doubt and uncertainty. Between a frozen composition contrasted with these disordered figures and classical forms alongside signs of contemporary culture, the relationships and contradictions of the work seem to describe considerations and anxieties once faced by Chinese artists as they came into contact with the Western art tradition. Oh! (Lot 404), which Liu Ye completed in the mid-1990s after returning to China from Germany, is an important step in the establishment of the artist's style. Formally, its composition resembles the centre of a strong spotlight on a stage, focusing the attention of the viewer on the figure of a young girl. Like the "Red May" singing competitions students were once brought to watch, the red is striking and the green is vibrant as the exaggerated effects of the stage enthuse the heart of the viewer, who seems to be truly experiencing the feeling of sitting beneath the stage. At what should be a solemn and dignified moment with applause rising from the crowd, it appears as if a naughty child has misbehaved; the girl on the stage, yelling 'Oh', instinctively and playfully sticks out her tongue - such are the possibilities that flash across the viewer's mind. The surreal absurdity of the work is further enhanced by the girl's old-fashioned glasses and doll-like bob haircut. Liu locates the composition harshly on a narrow canvas, and strictly controls the red of the painting within a narrow spectrum. Occasionally using high contrast and occasionally choosing gentle transitions, building a contrast between vertical and horizontal, and figuratively expressing abstracted elements, the mastery of the artist's manoeuvres is evident in his playful theme, symbolism and aesthetic strategy.
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