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Newell Convers Wyeth

United States (1882 -  1945 ) Wikipedia® : Newell Convers Wyeth
WYETH Newell Convers I Thank Him For The Knowledge That - I Shall Not Tell

Bonhams /Nov 22, 2016
52,892.56 - 79,338.84
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
233

Some works of Newell Convers Wyeth

Extracted between 233 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled (couple And Wagon)

Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled (couple And Wagon)

Original 1914
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Gross Price
Lot number: 92
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
N. C. Wyeth UNTITLED (COUPLE AND WAGON) 1882 - 1945 signed N.C. Wyeth twice (lower right) oil on canvas 44 by 32 inches (111.8 by 81.3 cm) Painted in 1914.  Provenance (probably) Street & Smith, New York Private collection, New York American Illustrators Gallery, New York Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1987 Literature The Popular Magazine, September 1914, vol. 33, illustrated on the cover Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 267 Christine B. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 2008, vol. I, no. I556, p. 302, illustrated  Catalogue Note N.C. Wyeth painted this work for the cover of The Popular Magazine in 1914. The publication often featured exciting and dramatic short stories set in the frontier, west of the Mississippi River. As a result, Wyeth typically created scenes of rural life and adventure for the magazine, a job for which he was especially well-suited due to his upbringing in bucolic Needham, Massachusetts. \\\“My brothers and I were brought up on a farm,\\\” the artist later explained of his propensity for this type of imagery, \\\“and from the time I could walk I was conscripted into doing every conceivable chore that there was to do about the place. This early training gave me a vivid appreciation of the part the body played in action. Now, when I paint a figure on horseback, a man plowing, or a woman buffeted by the wind, I have an acute bodily sense of the muscle-strain, the feeling of the hickory handle, or the protective bend of the head or squint of eye that each pose involves\\\” (quoted in in Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 68).   92 N. C. Wyeth signed N.C. Wyeth twice (lower right) oil on canvas 44 by 32 inches (111.8 by 81.3 cm) Painted in 1914. 
Newell Convers Wyeth - As He Sat In The Doorway…

Newell Convers Wyeth - As He Sat In The Doorway…

Original
Estimate:

Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 163
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Property from the Estate of Dr. Gerald F. Ross Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) "As He Sat in the Doorway Looking at the Storm He Realized that He was Shaken by a Wild, Crude Lyric of Passion" signed 'Wyeth' (lower right) oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 25 in. (64.1 x 63.5 cm.) Painted in 1908. Lot Notes The present work by N.C. Wyeth depicts the tragic romantic hero of Hamlin Garland\\\’s serialized short story \\\“The Outlaw and the Girl\\\” published in The Ladies\\\’ Home Journal in 1908. With the subtitle \\\“A Singular Romance of a Girl in the Rocky Mountains,\\\” the dramatic narrative was advertised as: \\\“Here a girl faces a unique situation: a perplexing and thrilling problem. When brought face to face with a young train-robber in a Rocky Mountain cabin she suddenly finds herself the central figure in a romance that is about as heart-holding as a girl might well wish to experience. With the thrilling dash of the great West, the story fairly sweeps the reader with it until an unexpected climax ends an episode that is truly breath-catching in its nature.\\\” (The Ladies\\\’ Home Journal, vol. 25, no. 5, April 1908, p. 1) Accompanying the fourth chapter in the June 1908 issue, \\\“As He Sat in the Doorway…\\\” captures the outlaw in a moment of introspection as he balances his new passionate romantic interest with a life on the run from the law, and stands as a striking example of Wyeth\\\’s ability to capture the drama of the Old West and its people through his acclaimed illustrations. In Garland\\\’s tale \\\“The Outlaw and the Girl,\\\” New Yorker Alice Mansfield accompanies a survey expedition of Frémont Peak in California. While navigating through the northern slope\\\’s rough country, known to be the retreat of cattle-thieves and criminals, Alice\\\’s horse trips and her foot is painfully injured, preventing her from continuing on to the summit. Left behind in a cabin in the nearby woods with only the botanist's wife for company, Alice is awoken in the middle of the night by a bright light revealing \\\“a man\\\’s face, young, smooth, with dark eyes gleaming beneath a broad hat.\\\” Alice soon realizes, \\\“She had seen on the wall of the station at \\\‘the road\\\’ the description of a train-robber which tallied closely with this man\\\’s general appearance, and the conviction that she was living in the hidden hut of an outlaw grew into a certainty.\\\” (The Ladies\\\’ Home Journal, vol. 25, no. 6, May 1908, p. 8) Despite the $2,000 bounty on his head, the outlaw, revealed to be ex-Rough Rider Hall Mc Cord, soon proves himself a competent protector as the party is snowed in for days, and the pair quickly form an emotional attachment. Although the men of the expedition return and the sheriff comes to investigate, Mc Cord cannot bring himself to fully leave Alice behind in time to escape. The tragic tale ends when Alice hears a shot outside the cabin; the sheriff\\\’s men kill the outlaw, even as he was peacefully surrendering. The present painting illustrates the night the couple spend snowed in at the cabin together: \\\“To the outlaw in the Rocky Mountain cabin in that stormy night it was in every respect the climax of his life. As he sat in the doorway looking at the fire and over into the storm beyond, he realized that he was shaken by a wild, crude lyric of passion. Here was, to him, the pure emotion of love. All the beautiful things he had ever heard or read of girlhood, of women, of marriage rose in his mind to make this night an almost intolerable blending of joy and sorrow, hope and despair.\\\” (The Ladies\\\’ Home Journal, vol. 25, no. 7, June 1908, p. 17) Here, Wyeth transforms Garland\\\’s ill-fated character of Hall Mc Cord into the embodiment of the archetypal American cowboy, a handsome fellow gallantly keeping watch during a cold night, wearing his hat and boots with weapon at the ready around his waist. Through a moody environment and nuanced lighting, Wyeth captures the introspection conveyed in the lines of the story and adds a characteristic sense of mystery to the darkly attractive train-robber. Executed during a period in which Scribner's declared that Wyeth's Western pictures had \\\“no equal in his field,\\\” \\\“As He Sat in the Doorway…\\\” conveys the mystique and drama of the Old West and, more particularly, the romance of the characters who inhabited it. Provenance: Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1974-75. Judy Goffman Fine Arts, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania. Steven Straw, Newburyport, Massachusetts. Phillips, Boston, Massachusetts, The Steven Straw Collection of American Paintings and Furniture, 2 May 1980, lot 98. Acquired by the late owner from the above. Literature: H. Garland, "The Outlaw and the Girl," The Ladies' Home Journal, vol. 25, no. 7, June 1908, p. 17, illustrated. D. Allen, D. Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 261. C.B. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, vol. 1, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 2008, pp. 176-77, no. I.215, illustrated.
Newell Convers Wyeth - The Departure Of The Rose

Newell Convers Wyeth - The Departure Of The Rose

Original
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Starting price:

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Gross Price
Lot number: 44
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
NEWELL CONVERS WYETH (american 1882-1945) "THE DEPARTURE OF THE ROSE" (THE MOTHER OF THE HERO) Signed ''N.C. Wyeth'' bottom right; also with artist and title on label verso, oil on canvas 40 1/2 x 30 in. (102.9 x 76.2cm) provenance: The Artist. Acquired from the above by Mrs. N.C. Wyeth, 1962. Acquired from the above as a gift. The Hickman (Friends Boarding Home), West Chester, Pennsylvania.
Newell Convers Wyeth - I Thank Him For The Knowledge That - I Shall Not Tell

Newell Convers Wyeth - I Thank Him For The Knowledge That - I Shall Not Tell

Original 1910
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Lot number: 50
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) "I Thank Him for the Knowledge That - I Shall Not Tell!... And, Perhaps,... I Shall Not Wholly Die....Perhaps" signed and dated 'NC Wyeth / 10' (upper right) oil en grisaille on canvas 28 1/4 x 42in Footnotes Provenance Sale, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1969. Somerville Manning Gallery, Greenville, Delaware. Private collection, Rhode Island. Sale, Heritage Auctions, New York, October 26, 2013, lot 78171. Acquired by the present owner from the above. Exhibited Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, Gmeiner Art and Cultural Center, September 1999. Literature E.M. Rhodes, "The Line of Least Resistance," The Saturday Evening Post 183, no. 10, September 3, 1910, p. 23, illustrated. D. Allen and D. Allen Jr., N.C. Wyeth, The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 273. C.B. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, vol. I, London, 2008, p. 214, no. I.315, illustrated.
Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled

Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled

Original c.1911
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 39
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
N.C. Wyeth 1882 - 1945 UNTITLED (THE FARMER) signed NC Wyeth (lower right) oil on canvas 36 by 23 3/4 inches (91.4 by 60.3 cm) Painted circa 1911. Provenance Henry William Ralston, Sr., New York Private Collection, White Plains, New York, 1942 By descent to the present owner Literature The Popular Magazine, August 1911, vol. 21, illustrated on the cover Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 269 Christine B. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 2008, vol. I, no. I. 354, p. 234 Catalogue Note N.C. Wyeth painted this recently discovered work for The Popular Magazine in 1911. The publication often featured exciting and dramatic short stories set in the frontier west of the Mississippi River. As a result, the magazine primarily commissioned Wyeth to create scenes of rural life and adventure, a job for which he was especially well-suited given his upbringing in bucolic Needham, Massachusetts. “My brothers and I were brought up on a farm,” the artist later explained of his propensity for this type of imagery, “and from the time I could walk I was conscripted into doing every conceivable chore that there was to do about the place. This early training gave me a vivid appreciation of the part the body played in action. Now, when I paint a figure on horseback, a man plowing, or a woman buffeted by the wind, I have an acute bodily sense of the muscle-strain, the feeling of the hickory handle, or the protective bend of the head or squint of eye that each pose involves. After painting action scenes I have ached for hours because of having put myself in the other fellow’’’’’’’’s shoes as I realized him on the canvas” (quoted in Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations, and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 68).
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