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Newell Convers Wyeth

United States (1882 -  1945 ) Wikipedia® : Newell Convers Wyeth
WYETH Newell Convers Portrait Of A Farmer

Sotheby's
May 23, 2018
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Artworks in Arcadja
244

Some works of Newell Convers Wyeth

Extracted between 244 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Newell Convers Wyeth - Portrait Of A Farmer

Newell Convers Wyeth - Portrait Of A Farmer

Original 1943
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Gross Price
Lot number: 31
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Description:
PORTRAIT OF A FARMER (PENNSYLVANIA FARMER) N. C. Wyeth 1882 - 1945 signedN.C. WYETH(lower left) tempera on Renaissance panel 40 by 60 inches (101.6 by 152.4 cm) Painted in 1943. Provenance The artist Mrs. N.C. Wyeth, until 1956 [With]M. Knoedler & Co., New York Robert F. Woolworth, 1956 Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1994 Exhibited Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Carnegie Institute,Painting in the United States 1943,October-December 1943, no. 284 Toledo, Ohio, Toledo Museum of Art,Thirty-First Annual Exhibition of Selected American Paintings, June-August 1944 Wilmington, Delaware, Delaware Art Center, Wilmington Society of the Fine Arts,Thirty-First Annual Exhibition of the Work of Delaware Artists, Pupils of Howard Pyle, Members of the Society, November-December 1944, no. 25 Newport, Rhode Island, Art Association of Newport,Thirty-Fourth Annual Exhibition, July 1945 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts,One Hundred and Forty-First Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, January-March 1946, no. 22 New York, M. Knoedler & Co.Exhibition of Paintings by N.C. Wyeth, 1882-1945, October-November 1957, no. 27 (asPennsylvania Farmer) Literature American Artist,January 1945, n.p. "Wyeth Portrait Best Painting at 34th Art Association Show," July 1945, clipping from unidentified newspaper, n.p. Richard Layton, "Inventory of Paintings in the Wyeth Studio, 1950," Unpublished, Wyeth Family Archives, 1950, p. 91 Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr.,N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 190, illustrated Christine M. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, vol. II, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 2008, no. P59, p. 827, illustrated Catalogue Note N.C. Wyeth painted Portrait of a Farmer in 1943, by which time he had established himself among the most well-known and successful illustrators of the twentieth century. Wyeth created hundreds of images for prominent American companies and publications in addition to illustrating many celebrated novels such as Robert Louis Stevenson\’s Treasure Island. These commissions allowed the artist\’s bright, bold and dynamic aesthetic to deeply ingrain itself within the national popular consciousness. While Wyeth did not paint Portrait of a Farmer for a specific commission, it was ultimately reproduced in advertisements for the art supplies manufacturer F. Weber Company and was considered for use by Lederle Laboratories to promote the company\’s veterinary vitamins. Works such as Portrait of a Farmer attest to the deep inspiration Wyeth gleaned from the people and landscape of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Wyeth and his family moved to Chadds Ford in the Brandywine River Valley in 1908. Though he had spent summer months in the area while a student at art school, now settled in this bucolic environment he grew captivated by the rolling hills, neatly planted fields and simple way of life he observed there, and it profoundly affected all of the work he produced. \“In me has revived a stronger and more vital interest and love for the life that lies about me,\” he noted the year Chadds Ford became his permanent home. \“ I am finding deeper pleasure, deeper meanings in the simple things in the country life here. Being older and more mature, I am realizing that one must go beneath the surface to paint and so it is that my loves, my real affections are reviving\” (as quoted in Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, pp. 63-64). In Portrait of a Farmer, Wyeth renders the Pennsylvania landscape in full autumnal splendor, the trees ablaze in vibrant tones of red, yellow and orange. A farmer stands in the foreground, smiling broadly as if demonstrating the pride he derives from the land that he owns and the life he has built. Behind his sturdy barn, a colorful planted field extends into the distance, indicating that the farmer and his family will be well-prepared for the impending winter. Wyeth utilizes minute multicolored brushstrokes to render both the landscape and figural elements, creating a veritable tapestry of vibrant patterning that contributes to the painting\’s rich surface. Compositionally, the rippling, almost rhythmic manner with which he depicts the surrounding countryside expresses its fecundity and vitality, and strongly evokes the work of Grant Wood, whose unique vision of the American landscape rose to prominence in the 1930s (Fig. 1). Wyeth was undoubtedly aware of Wood\’s Regionalist vision and the landscapes he painted that, notes Barbara Haskell, present primarily as \“interlaced patterns of undulating, swollen shapes suggestive of growth and prosperity whose multiple focal points keep the viewer\’s eye in constant motion by giving all parts of the composition equal visual weight\” (Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables, New York, 2018, p. 23). The artist later explained in an undated note that this painting was in part inspired by a local farmer he witnessed carrying a pig under his arm. He based the barn on his memory of one in the area that had been destroyed by a fire five years earlier. The additional elements of the stone house and wooden fences were common sights in the Brandywine River Valley. Before completing the final version, Wyeth created several preparatory studies that provide insight into his technical process and to the dedication with which he executed this composition (Fig. 2). Indeed, the artist recognized the merits of the work soon after he completed it, writing to his daughter, Henriette, on January 21, 1943: "My escape from apprehensive hours still remains to me through my painting. In spite of all, my present large panel of the squealing pig is vastly superior to anything to date" (Christine Podmaniczky, \“N.C. Wyeth Catalogue Raisonne,\” Brandywine River Museum of Art, http://collections.brandywine.org/objects/11046/portrait-of-a-farmer). Wyeth\’s romantic vision of the American landscape ultimately manifests itself within the entirety of his oeuvre, even in the works he created for specific patrons with particular objectives. Explains Roger Reed, \“Although Wyeth\’s illustrations are ostensibly about the characters and events in his stories, his settings—mostly landscapes—are a vital part of his illustrations and often upstage the action….It is evident, however, that Wyeth concentrated on this aspect of his assignments and took particular enjoyment in working out his landscapes…Whether for an exhibition or the printed page, a Wyeth painting is first recognizable by his sea foam, his dust, his grass or, particularly, his clouds. One could argue that Wyeth\’s landscapes carry the freight of his illustrations\” (Roger Reed, Walt Reed ,et al., Visions of Adventure: N.C. Wyeth and the Brandywine Artists, New York, 2000, p. 105).
Newell Convers Wyeth - Brandywine Landscape

Newell Convers Wyeth - Brandywine Landscape

Original 1932-34
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Lot number: 38
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Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) Brandywine Landscape signed 'N.C. Wyeth' (lower right) oil on canvas 47 ¾ x 43 in. (121.3 x 109 cm.) Painted circa 1932-34. Provenance Archibald Hanna, Jr., Branford, Connecticut. Russell Burke, New York, by 1987. James B. Cummins, Bookseller, New York, 1987. Acquired by the present owner from the above.
Newell Convers Wyeth - Wallace Draws The King's Sword

Newell Convers Wyeth - Wallace Draws The King's Sword

Original
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Net Price
Lot number: 375
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Description: Newell Convers Wyeth (American, 1882-1945) Wallace Draws the King's Sword Signed "NCWyeth" u.r., identified in a presentation plaque and on a label from Scribner's Magazine, New York, affixed to the reverse. Oil on canvas, 40 x 32 in. (101.5 x 81.0 cm), in a Foster Brothers frame. Condition: Minor canvas rippling to upper corners, scattered small abrasions, surface grime. Provenance: Collection of Charles Scribner's Sons; by descent within the family of the publisher to the current owner. N.B. N.C. Wyeth is one of America's greatest and best-loved illustrators, as well as an accomplished easel painter. With Massachusetts roots, Wyeth first studied art at the Massachusetts Normal Art School (today's Mass College of Art) and with Eric Pape and Charles W. Reed. However his most impactful mentor was Howard Pyle, with whom he studied during 1902-1904 in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Pyle urged his students to "jump into" their illustrations, enlivening their compositions with a vigorous style and sense of drama, while always adhering to the highest craftsmanship. Wyeth embodied this advice throughout his remarkable career. He sold his first illustration to the Saturday Evening Post in 1903 at 21 years of age and went on to create nearly 2,500 illustrations for the magazine. In 1911 he accepted his first book commission from Charles Scribner, to illustrate Treasure Island, a tremendous success leading to work on a whole range of adventure books including Kidnapped, Robin Hood, Robinson Crusoe and The Last of the Mohicans, which came to be known as Scribner's Classics, many still in print today. These illustrations defined the image of the brave and adventurous hero for generations of young readers, and it has been suggested that the illustrations became the inspiration for many of the current cinematic heroes such as Indiana Jones. Wyeth's illustrations for The Scottish Chiefs were created c. 1921, for the first edition of Jane Porter's book. The painting being offered at Skinner has been in private hands since that time, and descended in the Scribner family. The scene depicts a pivotal moment in the life of Sir William Wallace, a Scottish knight and leader during the Wars of Scottish Independence, who defeated an English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297. The dramatic scene shows Wallace, faced with the splintering alliance and betrayal of fellow Scottish chieftains who mean to take him prisoner, drawing the sword he had captured from Edward I at Stirling and shouting, "He that first makes a stroke at me shall find his death on this Southron steel! This sword I made the arm of the usurper yield to me; and this sword shall defend the regent of Scotland." In addition to Jane Porter's narrative, Wallace's life was retold in Blind Harry's 15th-century epic poem The Wallace, in works by Sir Walter Scott, and more recently in the Academy Award-winning film Braveheart (1995). The lot is accompanied by a copy of The Scottish Chiefs written by Jane Porter and illustrated by N.C. Wyeth, in which the painting is reproduced on page 318. As mentioned above, the original copyright date for the book was 1921; this edition bears the date 1933 on the title page.
Newell Convers Wyeth - Buy War Bonds

Newell Convers Wyeth - Buy War Bonds

Original 1942
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Lot number: 272
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Description:
NEWELL CONVERS WYETH (1882-1945) BUY WAR BONDS. 1942. 39 3/4x30 inches, 101x76 1/4 cm. U.S. Government Printing Office, [Washington, D.C.] Condition A-: minor creases along vertical and horizontal folds; minor creases in image; skinning in lower image. Paper. This is the medium size of three formats. Pollack cover and p. 88.
Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled (couple And Wagon)

Newell Convers Wyeth - Untitled (couple And Wagon)

Original 1914
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Gross Price
Lot number: 92
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N. C. Wyeth UNTITLED (COUPLE AND WAGON) 1882 - 1945 signed N.C. Wyeth twice (lower right) oil on canvas 44 by 32 inches (111.8 by 81.3 cm) Painted in 1914.  Provenance (probably) Street & Smith, New York Private collection, New York American Illustrators Gallery, New York Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1987 Literature The Popular Magazine, September 1914, vol. 33, illustrated on the cover Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 267 Christine B. Podmaniczky, N.C. Wyeth: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 2008, vol. I, no. I556, p. 302, illustrated  Catalogue Note N.C. Wyeth painted this work for the cover of The Popular Magazine in 1914. The publication often featured exciting and dramatic short stories set in the frontier, west of the Mississippi River. As a result, Wyeth typically created scenes of rural life and adventure for the magazine, a job for which he was especially well-suited due to his upbringing in bucolic Needham, Massachusetts. \\\“My brothers and I were brought up on a farm,\\\” the artist later explained of his propensity for this type of imagery, \\\“and from the time I could walk I was conscripted into doing every conceivable chore that there was to do about the place. This early training gave me a vivid appreciation of the part the body played in action. Now, when I paint a figure on horseback, a man plowing, or a woman buffeted by the wind, I have an acute bodily sense of the muscle-strain, the feeling of the hickory handle, or the protective bend of the head or squint of eye that each pose involves\\\” (quoted in in Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, New York, 1972, p. 68).   92 N. C. Wyeth signed N.C. Wyeth twice (lower right) oil on canvas 44 by 32 inches (111.8 by 81.3 cm) Painted in 1914. 
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