Frederick Ronald Williams

(19271982 ) - Artworks
WILLIAMS Frederick Ronald Landscape, Sherbrooke Forest

Menzies Art Brands /Sep 23, 2014
180,957.76 - 222,717.25
Not Sold

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Variants on Artist's name :

Williams Fred

 

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Donald Friend, Lloyd Frederic Rees, Arthur James Murch, Hans Heysen, Brett Whiteley, John Coburn, Cedric Emmanuel Flower
Artworks in Arcadja
345

Some works of Frederick Ronald Williams

Extracted between 345 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Frederick Ronald Williams - One Tree Hill

Frederick Ronald Williams - One Tree Hill

Original 1968
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Lot number: 15
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Description: FRED WILLIAMS, 1927 - 1982, ONE TREE HILL, 1968, oil on canvas SIGNED: signed lower left: Fred Williams DIMENSIONS: 101.5 x 112.0 cm EXHIBITED: Fred Williams: A Retrospective, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 7 November 1987 - 31 January 1988, then touring to National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney LITERATURE: Fred Williams: A Retrospective, catalogue to accompany the touring exhibition, Australian National Gallery, Canberra, 1987, cat. 94, p. 17 (illus.) Mollison, J., A Singular Vision: The Art of Fred Williams, Australian National Gallery, Canberra, 1989, pp. 136-137 (illus. p. 136) PROVENANCE: Estate of the artist, Melbourne Lyn Williams Collection, Melbourne Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 19 April 2011, lot 11 Private collection, Brisbane Featured in the important Fred Williams retrospective exhibition curated by James Mollison for the National Gallery of Australia in 1987, One Tree Hill 1968 is a singular, major work in an oeuvre distinguished by individuality. It is the first Fred Williams painted in oils, out of doors, in his mature style. Moreover, the usual browns and ochres give way to greens celebrating the fecundity and regenerative powers of nature. On a winter's day in June 1968 Williams set out with his fellow artist Hal Hattam to paint in the Ferntree Gully National Park in the Dandenong Ranges. Later that day he wrote in his dairy, 'Down the track at the pond at F.T.G.N.P. find a very lovely spot - I had previously made several gouaches here and we work all day - in spite of drizzle. These are the first outdoor oils I have painted in many years! ... This has probably meant my closest look at a piece of country since the early days at Lilydale.'1 During the previous summer the fires that ravaged the Dandenongs nearly destroyed Williams's home at Upwey. The traumatic yet inspiring experience led him to paint the very moving bushfire series including such works as Burnt Landscape 1968 in the Gordon Darling collection. Back in his studio following the Ferntree Gully excursion, Williams painted the related oil One Tree Hill 1968-69, the dark presence of ashes placing this and our painting among the series which embraced the destructive and regenerative powers of nature. In One Tree Hill 1968, a painterly celebration of the latter, the emphasis is on abundance of growth. This he achieves through a range of rich colours and textures within the landscape, enveloped in a delicate mist of greens. By working directly from the motif, Williams was able to capture the transient winter drizzle with impressionistic verve, subtly expressing the rain falling from the sky across the land through the vertical movements of his brush. A further feature which makes this painting unique in Williams's oeuvre is the prominent crossed tracks, the St Andrews Cross device which he used so frequently in later work as the structural girder upon which to hang his paint - much the same way the Cubists used the grid in their compositions.2 In One Tree Hill the cross is a prominent, realistic element within the landscape as well as being a masterly compositional device. While scholars have noted the greater realism of Williams's paintings of this time, they likewise acknowledged the growing maturity of Williams's visual language and masterly handling of paint. This can be seen in our painting in the use of the cross as both a prominent feature of the landscape and as a central part of the composition - a skilful blending of realism and reductive abstraction. The detail of the bush is rendered with textural daubs of colour-laden paint, conversely detailed and minimal. The forest landscape, crossed roads, horizon of trees and open sky are presented as an absorbing illusion of reality. But the wonder and beauty of the work lies above all in its formal and imaginative creativity, a work of art that happens to be of a landscape. 1. Williams's diary entry for 29 June 1968, as quoted in Mollison, op.cit., p. 137. Since 1987 the Park has been part of the Dandenong Ranges National Park. 2. See 'Fred Williams [painting] at Yan Yean, 1972', in McCaughey, P., Fred Williams, Bay Books, Sydney, 1980, fig.158 DAVID THOMAS
Frederick Ronald Williams - Trees And Rocks Ii

Frederick Ronald Williams - Trees And Rocks Ii

Original 1963
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Lot number: 24
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FREDERICK (FRED) RONALD WILLIAMS (1927-1982) Trees and Rocks II 1963 tempera and oil on board signed and dated 'Fred Williams 63' lower left bears title and cat. no. 12 on label verso 105 x 81 cm EXHIBITED: The Boxer Collection, University Art Gallery, University of Melbourne, 1-30 August 1974, cat. no. 30 (Possibly) The Boxer Collection, Albert Hall, Canberra, October – November 1977 (no catalogue) The Boxer Collection: Modernism, Murrumbeena and Angry Penguins , The Nolan Gallery, Tharwa, ACT, 17 December 1981 – 28 February 1982, cat. no. 21 Crossing Cultures: Art From the Boxer Collection, Drill Hall, Canberra, May – June 2000, cat. no. 58 LITERATURE: The Boxer Collection, University Art Gallery, University of Melbourne, 1974, p. 4; p. 4 (Possibly) The Boxer Collection, Albert Hall, Canberra, October – November 1977 (no catalogue) The Boxer Collection: Modernism, Murrumbeena and Angry Penguins , The Nolan Gallery, Tharwa, ACT, 1981, p. 3, 15; p. 14, (illustrated, pl. no. 12) Crossing Cultures: Art from the Boxer Collection, Drill Hall, Canberra, 2000, p. 12 Painted in the year he was awarded the Helena Rubenstein Travelling Scholarship, Trees and Rocks II, 1963, is a fine example taken from William’’s best loved period (1963-68), one which Patrick McCaughey defined as ‘the richest and most consistent five years of Williams creative life’’. McCaughey identifying the paintings of 1963-4 as those which ‘came to be regarded as the quintessence of Williams, a touchstone by which all his other landscape styles and modes were to be judged'. This five year period marked the Williams’’ coming of age as a painter. At thirty-six, he was enjoying both local and internal popular and critical success, having recently been included in the Whitechapel’’s Recent Australian Painting in 1961, the Tate’’ s Australian Painting exhibition of 1963 and the Australian Painting Today exhibition which travelled across Europe. The early 1960s was a period defined by the boom in the exhibition of and reception of Australian art in the UK which Williams savoured. However, whilst the art of compatriots such as Brett Whitely and Nolan became slowly integrated and a part of the London art scene, Williams remained focused on idiosyncratic Australian imagery. Although patterns of trees and rocks were present in William’’ s work from the 1950s, the current painting was inspired by an environment in which artist was by now comfortable working in. Often sketching and painting en plein air excursions in and around the granite hills of the You Yangs, 60km west of Melbourne, Williams now synthesised the motifs of fallen trees, weathered rocks and scattered shrubs into reduced geometric forms in a uniquely novel manner. This essential treatment of the geological formations and clustered native vegetation, densely worked and compactly arranged, in honey and ochre stained sky and land, render Tree and Rocks II , 1963 an abstract-cubist essay of the classic Williams landscape. When discussing the Trees and Rocks series of 1963, McCaughey noted how Williams, ‘was at home in the landscape … Trees and Rocks I and II remind us how much Williams remains a painter of feeling even in his most classical moments. Usually that feeling is channelled into augmenting his art but, occasionally, expressive energy boils over, as in these splendid paintings.’’ Oils from 1963 are either in institutional collections or tightly held by private collectors, making the sale of this well-known work, an exceptionally rare one.
Frederick Ronald Williams - Music Hall

Frederick Ronald Williams - Music Hall

Original 1956
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Lot number: 466
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Description:
FRED WILLIAMS (1927-1982) Music Hall 1956 etching and drypoint 16.0 x 15.0 cm numbered, signed and dated below image edition: 8/9 Provenance: Australian Galleries, Melbourne (label attached verso, no.200270) Private collection, Melbourne Reference: Mollison, J., Fred Williams: Etchings , Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1968, p.92, no.26 (illus., another example), p.22, pl.10 (illus., another example)
Frederick Ronald Williams - Landscape, Sherbrooke Forest

Frederick Ronald Williams - Landscape, Sherbrooke Forest

Original 1961
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Lot number: 39
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FRED WILLIAMS (1927-1982) Landscape, Sherbrooke Forest 1961-62 oil on board 121.0 x 90.0 cm signed lower right: Fred Williams Provenance: Private collection, Victoria Private collection, Sydney Related Works: Olinda Landscape , 1961, oil and tempera on composition board, 91 x 91 cm.; illus. in McCaughey, P., Fred Williams 1927-1982 , Bay Books, Sydney, 1980, p.140. Trees at Olinda , 1961, oil on composition board, 91 x 61 cm., illus. in McCaughey, P., Fred Williams 1927-1982 , Bay Books, Sydney, 1980, p.141. Sherbrook e, 1961, oil on composition board, 142.3 x 122 cm., Art Gallery of New South Wales; illus. in McCaughey, P., Fred Williams 1927-1982 , Bay Books, Sydney, 1980, p.144. Sapling Forest , 1961, oil on composition board, 152.7 x 183.3 cm., National Gallery of Victoria; illus. in McCaughey, P., Fred Williams 1927-1982 , Bay Books, Sydney, 1980, p.149. Sapling Forest , 1962, 119 x 180.3 cm., oil on composition board, Mertz Collection of Australian Art, University of Texas, Austin, USA., on loan to the National Gallery of Australia.
Frederick Ronald Williams - You Yangs

Frederick Ronald Williams - You Yangs

Original 1964
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Lot number: 107
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: You Yangs gouache on paper signed lower right: Fred Williams signed lower right: Fred Williams (c) The Estate of Fred Williams. Licensed by VISCOPY Ltd, Australia Powell St Gallery, Melbourne, 1975|Private collection, Melbourne|Menzies, Melbourne, 20 March 2014, lot 83|Private collection, Sydney 57.0 x 76.0 cm FRED WILLIAMS gouache on paper 1964
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