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Frederick Ronald Williams

(1927 -  1982 )
WILLIAMS Frederick Ronald  Landscape Triptych No. 1

Menzies Art Brands
Aug 9, 2018
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Variants on Artist's name :

Williams Fred

 

Along with Frederick Ronald Williams, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Donald Friend, Lloyd Frederic Rees, Arthur James Murch, Hans Heysen, Brett Whiteley, John Coburn, Cedric Emmanuel Flower
Artworks in Arcadja
497

Some works of Frederick Ronald Williams

Extracted between 497 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Frederick Ronald Williams - Little Man Juggling

Frederick Ronald Williams - Little Man Juggling

Original 1954-56
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Lot number: 518
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FRED WILLIAMS (1927-1982) Little Man Juggling 1954-56 etching, aquatint, engraving, drypoint, rough biting and ink signed and dated lower right: Fred Williams 56 inscribed lower left: 1-12 15.6 x 17.2cm LITERATURE: Mollison, J., Fred Williams Etchings, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney 1968, plate 2, p.14 (illus.) and cat.5, p.89
Frederick Ronald Williams - Figure

Frederick Ronald Williams - Figure

Original 1958
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Lot number: 158
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FRED WILLIAMS (1927-1982) Figure 1958 etching 14/25 numbered, signed and dated below image 19 x 13.5cm Condition: - Work in very good condition with no major faults to report - Very faint foxing and begining signs evident in mount - Paper does not appear to be glued down to the backing board however please note, this has been examined outside of the frame - Work is framed in timber and in good condition - Work is ready to hang The opinions expressed in the condition reports are a guide only and should not be treated as a statement of fact. Prospective buyers are encouraged to inspect articles for sale at our pre-sale viewing where Leonard Joel staff are available for advice. Leonard Joel makes no guarantee of the originality of mechanical or applied components. Absence of reference to such modifications does not imply that a lot is free from modifications. Request a condition report
Frederick Ronald Williams - Kallista Hillside

Frederick Ronald Williams - Kallista Hillside

Original 1965
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Lot number: 2
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Description: FRED WILLIAMS, (1927 – 1982), KALLISTA HILLSIDE, 1965 , gouache on paper on composition board SIGNED: signed lower right: Fred Williams. bears inscription verso: No. 912 DIMENSIONS: 75.0 x 55.0 cm PROVENANCE: Alan and Nola Geddes, Sydney Estate of Nola Geddes, Sydney We are grateful to Lyn Williams for her assistance in cataloguing this work. ESSAY: Kallista Hillside, 1965 is one of the finest gouaches Fred Williams painted. It comes from a period of outstanding creativity, which included such masterpieces as Upwey Landscape I, 1965, in the collection of British Petroleum, London; Upwey Landscape II, 1965, in the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; and Upwey Landscape V, 1965, now in the Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria through the bequest of Blair Ritchie. Hailed as being \‘at his best\’ in his solo show at Rudy Komon\’s gallery in September 1966, Wallace Thornton in The Sydney Morning Herald presciently observed: \‘There is every chance he will go down in history as Australia\’s greatest landscape artist\’.1 Consisting of twelve oils and the same number of supporting gouaches, together with some etchings, the exhibition was packed with treasures. They included both oils and gouaches from the Waterpond in Landscape series, Green Cloud and Owl, 1966, one time in the Mertz Collection, USA, and Red Landscape, 1966. Of the latter, Patrick Mc Caughey commented perceptively: \‘The quality of the gouache for Red Landscape, possibly finer than the oil painting itself, suggests Williams was looking for a painting that would come out at a single shot, not something to be laboured over\’.2 The same can be said of our gouache, Kallista Hillside, the fluidity of the medium again providing for the more immediate and totally harmonious realisation. Williams often exhibited gouaches with his oil paintings, their importance in his oeuvre continuing to be recognised in later major shows including the National Gallery of Australia\’s 2011 retrospective, Fred Williams: Infinite Horizons. In 1971 Williams devoted an entire exhibition to \‘watercolours\’. Shown at the Newcastle Art Gallery before touring, the fifty works, selected by the artist from his own collection, covered the years 1957 to 1971. Kallista is a small town near Upwey where Williams spent time sketching in watercolour in the early sixties3 and Lyn Williams has identified this gouache, dated October 1965, as Kallista Hillside. It has all the presence of a major work embracing the exploration of pictorial space and the individuality of his vision of the Australian landscape. Ambiguity and no focal point add to its enticement. The absence of horizon and sky gives intensity to the aerial view and interplay between flattened ground and animated, seemingly floating surface details of the bush. There is a marvellous play between close up and distance as dabs, dashes and lines of paint metamorphose into bushes, lichen, or the run of sap into tree trunks, highlighted by touches of white. Add to this the appeal of texture and colour to transform the flat, monochromatic field of reddish brown into a variety of features and hues, brooded over by shadows cast in blue. To the far left suggestions of the outline of a water pond introduce a motif that reappears in the previously mentioned Waterpond in Landscape series of 1966, Waterpond in a Landscape I, 1966 once being in the collection of James Fairfax. Is Kallista Hillside 1965 a harbinger? 1. Gleeson, J., Sun, Sydney, 12 October 1966; Thornton, W., \‘Is this our greatest landscape painter?\’, Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, 12 October 1966, p. 22 2. Mc Caughey, P., Fred Williams, Murdoch Books, Sydney, 1996, p. 176 3. Mollison, J., A Singular Vision: The Art of Fred Williams, Australian National Gallery, Canberra, 1989, p. 87 DAVID THOMAS
Frederick Ronald Williams -  Landscape Triptych No. 1

Frederick Ronald Williams - Landscape Triptych No. 1

Original 1962
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Lot number: 166
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FRED WILLIAMS (1927-1982), Landscape Triptych No. 1 1962 12.5 x 27.5 cm edition: 5/35, 2nd state| numbered and signed below image sugar aquatint, engraving and drypoint Medium: sugar aquatint, engraving and drypoint Literature: Mollison, J., Fred Williams Etchings, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1968, p.122, cat.200 (ii) (illus., another example) Provenance: Mr Benjamin Peel, Brisbane Estate of the above
Frederick Ronald Williams -  – Ponds, Lysterfield

Frederick Ronald Williams - – Ponds, Lysterfield

Original 1966
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Lot number: 5
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FRED WILLIAMS , (1927 – 1982) , PONDS, LYSTERFIELD, 1966, oil on canvas SIGNED: signed lower right: Fred Williams DIMENSIONS: 86.0 x 71.0 cm PROVENANCE: Private collection, Victoria, acquired directly from the artist Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 30 November 2011, lot 9 Private collection, Sydney RELATED WORK: Ponds, Lysterfield, 1965 – 66, etching and aquatint, in Mollison, J., Fred Williams: Etchings, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1968, cat. 225, p. 129 (illus. Fig. 252) ESSAY: The paintings that Fred Williams exchanged with fellow artists were always special, invariably among his best. This is certainly so with Ponds, Lysterfield, 1966, which raises invention and subtlety of vision to a level of singularity that led us to see the Australian landscape with different eyes. As James Gleeson wrote of Williams's sell-out exhibition of 1966 at Rudy Komon's Gallery in Sydney – ‘It has been clear for some time that Williams was a landscapist of rare distinction, but this exhibition places him in that thinly populated category of painters who have helped to shape the vision a country has of itself’.1 Part of the miracle of Williams's art is its transformation of the subject, especially its scrubbiness and monotony, into paintings elegant, rich in colour, textural variation and imagination. Lysterfield Landscape I, 1965 – 66, collection of Rupert Murdoch, was one of the highlights of the 1966 exhibition. The largest among the many fine Lysterfield paintings is Lysterfield Triptych, 1967 – 68, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Williams frequently visited the Lysterfield region from the winter of 1965 onwards. It was not very far from his then home at Upwey. He painted there over a number of years into the 1970s, major works such as in Hillside at Lysterfield I and II of 1967 (private collections), capturing the changing light and colours of the seasons. With its predominance of cool tones, Ponds, Lysterfield evokes winter. The scrubby but empty countryside is created by a few impastoed strokes of the brush across a smooth field of velvety greys. These expressionist textures also contrast against the balance achieved through the accent on verticals and horizontals, and the classical association they give to the composition. A masterpiece of minimalism, the absence of a horizon line achieves greater harmony, earth and sky are one, supported by the multi-viewpoint and its combination of motifs seen from above and in profile. His art is ‘both intimate and remote’ wrote Elwyn Lynn in The Bulletin of Williams's 1966 exhibition’.2 Williams's remote intimacy is almost Chinese in its mixture of immediate gesture, of spontaneous notation, with contemplation and serenity’, he continued. In Ponds, Lysterfield the landscape provided Williams with the inspiration for a singular, lyrical essay on the Australian scene in all its casual formality. It is a painting of ineffable beauty. 1. Gleeson, J., ‘Williams is at His Best’, Sun, Sydney, 12 October 1966 2. Lynn, E., 'Poetic Bushland', Bulletin, Sydney, 22 October 1966, p. 54 DAVID THOMAS
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