Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Edwin Lord Weeks

United States (1849 -  1903 ) Wikipedia® : Edwin Lord Weeks
WEEKS Edwin Lord A Fête Day At Bekanir - Beloochistan, Bekanir

Christie's /May 23, 2017
269,566.00 - 449,276.66
Not Sold

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Edwin Lord Weeks at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Artworks in Arcadja
192

Some works of Edwin Lord Weeks

Extracted between 192 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Edwin Lord Weeks - Street In Amen Abad

Edwin Lord Weeks - Street In Amen Abad

Original
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 855
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
855 Edwin Lord Weeks (Massachusetts, 1849-1903) Street in Amen Abad, signed lower left "E.L. Weeks", inscribed with title verso, colorman stamp verso, gouache and watercolor on watercolor board, 19 x 13 in.; original composition and giltwood period Moorish style frame 25-3/4 x 19-3/4 in. Provenance: Private Collection Condition: toning, fading; frame with abrasions, chips, some loss to composition and gilt
Edwin Lord Weeks -  Drinking Tea

Edwin Lord Weeks - Drinking Tea

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 61
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Edwin Lord Weeks (American, 1849-1903) Drinking tea signed and dedicated 'To my friend Ranlett-/E. L. Weeks' (upper right) oil on canvas 14 ¾ x 10 ¾ in. (37.4 x 27.2 cm.) The paint layer appears to be in excellent secure and stable condition and is covered in light surface dirt.<br>Examination under UV lights shows no apparent retouches, an unevenly applied varnish and some flaring of original darker pigment in the background and the signature.<br>Overall the painting presents very well in an ornate period gilt frame.<br>The colour in the catalogue illustration are fairly accurate." />
Edwin Lord Weeks - Nomads In The Egyptian Desert With Camels Resting

Edwin Lord Weeks - Nomads In The Egyptian Desert With Camels Resting

Original
Estimate:

Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 96
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903) American Orientalist, Watercolour, Nomads in the Egyptian desert with camels resting, Monogrammed lower right. 9 x 5 3/4" CONDITION: Please Note - we do not make reference to the condition of lots within catalogue descriptions. We are however happy to provide additional information regarding the condition of items on request.
Edwin Lord Weeks - A Fête Day At Bekanir - Beloochistan, Bekanir

Edwin Lord Weeks - A Fête Day At Bekanir - Beloochistan, Bekanir

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 68
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Edwin Lord Weeks (American, 1849-1903) A Fête Day at Bekanir - Beloochistan, Bekanir with signature 'E. L. Weeks' (lower right) oil on canvas 55 5/8 x 73 ¾ in. (141.3 x 187.3 cm.) Painted circa 1895-1903. Now in Pakistan, Bekanir was in Weeks\\\’ day located in the extreme northwest of the Indian subcontinent, in what is now Balochistan. Bekanir was formerly the capital of the princely state of Bikanir, founded in 1496. The \\\‘fête day\\\’ was actually a two-day annual festival celebrating the establishment of the palace-fort. Bikanir\\\’s annual festival, celebrating foundation day, is was known as the Akshaya Tritaya fête. Bikanir palace, which looms over the background in Weeks\\\’ composition, is in a desert city and is now known as Jonagarh Fort, containing temples and palaces preserved as a museum. Weeks\\\’ expedition to Bikanir took place in January, 1893, en route by rail to Jodhpore and Jeypore. Obviously an Islamic city we see this echoed in the three young women in the foreground who wear face veils. The rest of this very large composition could well have been in Hindu India, judging by the elephants, master of ceremonies in white and other figures and animals assembled for the Rajah\\\’s visit, as well as the architectural backdrop itself. The painting is listed in the March, 1905 estate sale catalogue (American Art Galleries, New York) of the Works of the Late Edwin Lord Weeks, Finished Paintings, Studies, Sketches and Drawings (Lot 92) as unsigned. Indeed the signature at the lower-right of the painting is quite irregular and no doubt added later by another hand; but this does not detract from the absolute authenticity of the painting itself. The relatively coarse weave of the canvas and the \\\‘brushy\\\’ technique suggest the painting was executed towards 1902-03, characteristic of the artist\\\’s work during this time, and may explain why the painting was not yet signed. This magnificent painting of court life in late 19th-century India was composed of a great many studies in oil that Weeks made of Bikanir palace in 1893, even though the overall painting may not have been executed until eight-to-ten years later in his Paris studio. It exemplifies his \\\‘collage\\\’ technique of building a major composition utilizing in-situ studies made during his expedition. The painting reflects the festivities about to take place during the annual celebration of the city\\\’s founding. The architectural backdrop (the palace of Bikanir) is brilliantly and accurately recorded by Weeks, showing multiple tiers of the Rajah\\\’s many rooms, some painted in white (the lower stories) whereas the upper two stories are yellow and the section to the right constructed in wood. Yet the eye connects with the rooms on the middle level, shaded by red fabric and probably the quarters of the Rajah\\\’s private harem. The eye is astonished by the assemblage in the courtyard of elephants, camels and people within the palace court. The glorious decorated elephant on the right is the same one depicted in an earlier painting, Les elephants de Rajah de Jodhpore, with its intricately woven gold and multicolored covering and the Rajah\\\’s seat upon its back. The elephant behind, with its upraised trunk, is depicted in Weeks\\\’ travel account of his expedition From the Black Sea through Persia and India (Harper\\\’s, 1895), on p.231 with the title \\\“Palace of the Rajah of Bikanir\\\”. The three women in the foreground conform to Muslim tradition in their dress and stand adjacent to the white Master of Ceremonies who is ready to lead the procession celebrating Bikanir, all watched by a crowd of visitors converged on the palace stairs behind. Weeks\\\’ own words in his descriptive travel account of 1895 (see ibid.) give us the real flavor of his first-hand impressions of Bikanir: 'The great fortress and palace of Bikanir bring to mind the Arab proverb concerning \\\‘the prince who builds a palace and ruins a city\\\’, for as is frequently the case in Rajpootana its magnificence is out of all proportion to the size of the city grouped about it. Although placed on the same level as the town ... it is still an imposing and magnificent pile. Surrounded by massive sloping walls ... and entered by a drawbridge crossing a wide moat ... it looks fit to sustain a siege. ... Towering many stories above the court-yard rose the facade of the palace, with endless tiers of latticed galleries shaded by faded red curtains. The highest point of all was a sloping pyramidal roof of blue glazed tiles.' (pp. 229-230) '... The vast palace yard, beyond the elephant gate, seemed to be the centre of life, and was never quiet at any hour of the day. Groups of servants, soldiers and retainers were constantly passing in and out, while here and there a little knot of men, liveried in scarlet and yellow or in white, squatted on their heels around the bubbling hookah, and each group formed the nucleus of a changing crowd.' (p. 234) We would like to thank Dr. Ellen K. Morris for contributing this catalogue note. A Letter of Authentication from Dr. Morris accompanies the painting. A Fête Day at Bekanir–Beloochistan will be included in her Edwin Lord Weeks catalogue raisonné, currently under preparation.
Edwin Lord Weeks - Merchants Along A Street In Bombay

Edwin Lord Weeks - Merchants Along A Street In Bombay

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 28
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Edwin Lord Weeks (American, 1849-1903) Merchants along a street in Bombay signed and inscribed 'E.L. Weeks/ Bombay' (lower left) oil on canvas 13 x 18 3/4in (33 x 47.5cm) This work was likely painted circa 1883 on Weeks' first expedition to India. We are grateful to Dr. Ellen K. Morris for confirming the authenticity of this work and providing additional cataloguing data. This work will be included in the forthcoming Edwin Lord Weeks catalogue raisonné.
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr