Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Mary B. Way

United States (1769 -  1833 )
WAY Mary B. Profile Bust Portrait Of A Gentleman

Sotheby's
Jan 19, 2006
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Mary B. Way at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Mary B. Way, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Charles Willson Peale, Charles B. J. Fevret De Saint-Memin, Dean I Wolstenholme, Joseph H. Hidley, Edward Hicks, Rufus Hathaway, Thomas Chambers
Artworks in Arcadja
6

Some works of Mary B. Way

Extracted between 6 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Mary B. Way - Profile Bust Portrait Of A Gentleman

Mary B. Way - Profile Bust Portrait Of A Gentleman

Original 1800
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 370
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Executed circa 1800; now in a shadow box frame. Cut paper, silk, gilt thread, lace appliqués mounted over brown silk in a gold-metal locket frame

CATALOGUE NOTE
Sisters Mary Way and Elizabeth Way (Champlain) were born into a New London, Connecticut, mercantile family just before the Revolution. By the 1790s, when they reached their early twenties, both were painting miniature portaits of neighbors and relatives. Mary Way abandoned Connecticut for New York in 1811 at the age of forty-two. There she quickly worked her way into the fringes of a coterie of successful painters including John Jarvis, Joseph Wood, and Anson Dickinson, who critiqued her style and loaned her paintings to copy. By 1818, Mary Way had attracted a significant clientel, drawing both from parishioners at her Universalist church and older New London connections; she advertised a "ladies drawing academy" in the New York papers and she had two miniatures on ivory included in the annual exhibition of the American Academy of Fine Arts. Mary Way was never a star in the city's art scene. And she never attained financial security. Still, when blindness ended her career in 1820, the Academy sponsored a benefit to raise money on her behalf. While no evidence survives to explain exactly how or when the Way sisters learned to paint, it seems probable that they encountered some sort of art instruction during stints at one of Connecticut's many female academies. The combination of delicately painted faces, applique, embroidery, and fine decorative sewing recalls the elaborate needlework pictures that young ladies produced at the culmination of their schooling.
Mary B. Way - Untitled

Mary B. Way - Untitled

Attributed 1825
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 296
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Attributed to Mary Way (1769-1833) or Betsy Way Champlain (1771-1825) together with a framed triptych of early photographs of similar works (2 pieces). Cut paper, applied black lace and silk fabric 3 by 2 1/2 in. Circa 1825 Middletown, Connecticut
Mary B. Way -  Miniature Full-length Portrait Of Theodosia Burr Alston (1783-1813)

Mary B. Way - Miniature Full-length Portrait Of Theodosia Burr Alston (1783-1813)

Attributed 18th Century
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 297
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Attributed to Mary Way or Betsy Way Champlain MINIATURE FULL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF THEODOSIA BURR ALSTON (1783-1813) Silk and lace applique with pencil and cut paper on black silk ground 4 by 3 in. Late 18th Century
Mary B. Way - Theodosia Bartow Prevost Burr (mrs. Aaron Burr)

Mary B. Way - Theodosia Bartow Prevost Burr (mrs. Aaron Burr)

Attributed 1800
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 298
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Attributed to Mary Way or Betsy Way Champlain THEODOSIA BARTOW PREVOST BURR (MRS. AARON BURR) In an eglomise black-painted glass mat and gilded wood frame. Watercolor, paper, silk net, silk and sequins 3 by 2 1/4 in. Circa 1800
Mary B. Way - Little Girl Standing On A Patterned Rug

Mary B. Way - Little Girl Standing On A Patterned Rug

Attributed 1800
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 16
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description:

Attributed to Mary Way (1769-1833)

dressed miniature of a little girl standing on a patterned rug, circa 1800

Watercolor and fabric on cut-out paper, glued to a silk ground, pressed metal frame.

3 1/4 in. x 2 1/2 in. (sight)

PROVENANCE:

By descent to present owner.
Scattered losses ( old insect damage) to fabric of dress below arm, some fading to carpet , minute losses of watercolor along outer edge of hair, the stamped frame matches those on the dressed miniatures by Way in the collection of the Lyman Allyn Museum, New London, CT.
Notes:

Literature: See William Lamson Warren, "Mary Way's Dressed Miniatures," The Magazine Antiques
, October 1992, pp. 540-549. Ramsay MacMullen,

Sisters of the Brush: Their Family, Art, Lives & Letters 1797-1833,

(2012).

Mary Way--born in New London, Connecticut to Mary Taber and shopkeeper Ebenezer Way--and her sister Elizabeth, or Eliza, (1771-1825) were artists and created dressed miniatures, as well as traditional miniature portraits on ivory. In 1809, Mary Way advertised a school for girls offering "painting, tambour, embroidery, lace work on muslin, reading, writing, plain sewing, etc." in the

Connecticut Gazette
. In 1811, Mary and Eliza moved to New York. Mary advertised herself at 95 Greenwich Street, as "a portrait and miniature painter" who could also paint "landscapes or views of country seats," and as a teacher of drawing. She remained in New York until 1820. She returned to New London, gradually going blind.
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr