John William Waterhouse

United Kingdom (18491917 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - John William Waterhouse
WATERHOUSE John William Interior At Pompeii

Canterbury Auction /May 22, 2012
247.31 - 370.97
Not disclosed

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Artworks in Arcadja
91

Some works of John William Waterhouse

Extracted between 91 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John William Waterhouse - An Eastern Interior With A Seated Girl

John William Waterhouse - An Eastern Interior With A Seated Girl

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Lot number: 63
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Sir John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) An Eastern interior with a seated girl signed and dated 'JWWaterhouse/1886' (lower right) oil on board 10¼ x 7.1/8 in. (26 x 18 cm.) I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. A gift from the artist to William Logsdail (1859-1944), and thence by descent. Anonymous sale; Bonhams, London, 22 April 2009, lot 140, where purchased by the present owner. Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Victorian Visions, 20 May-29 August 2010, no. 24. London, Leighton House, Victorian Visions, 26 April-23 September 2012, no. 10. Waterhouse did not often address Eastern subjects, but the few scenes he did depict are worth highlighting. In the early 1870s, he exhibited several pictures with titles such as The Slave, The Unwelcome Companion: A Street Scene in Cairo, and An Eastern Reminiscence. He became more closely associated with Greek and Roman antiquity, however, which is one reason why the 1884 unveiling of his sensational scene of ancient Hebrew superstition, Consulting the Oracle, drew so much attention and laid the groundwork for his election to the Royal Academy as an Associate member the following year. The present picture dates from 1886, a year after his election into British art's most exclusive club, and the same year as his The Magic Circle (which shows a black-haired, vaguely Eastern sorceress) was purchased for the nation through the prestigious Chantrey Bequest. That large painting demonstrated Waterhouse's openness to modern French methods, especially Jules Bastien-Lepage's broad brushwork and cool, silvery tones. Also depicting a dark-featured model, the present picture offers fascinating comparisons with an undated, unlocated oil of roughly the same size offered at Sotheby's, London on 26 November 1986 (lot 30). Eschewing narrative in favour of light, colour, and pattern, these scenes show the model smoking a cigarette in a green robe with pink-hued underclothes while sitting in a Moorish interior adorned with a mother-of-pearl inlaid table and exotic rug. The present picture is the more sultry of the two: hand planted impertinently on her hip, the model looks directly at us, charged with a restless energy that captivates us more than her dreamy cousin does. This moody aura of ambiguous possibilities led directly to Waterhouse's depiction of the similarly posed Cleopatra, which he developed as both a painting and Goupilgravure for The Graphic magazine's Gallery of Shakespeare's Heroines in 1887-88. The bravura brushwork here underscores the modern, continental aesthetic embraced in the 1880s by Waterhouse and the man to whom he gave this picture, his fellow English painter William Logsdail (1859-1944). In the 1880s, Waterhouse formed a close friendship with Logsdail, who had moved from his native Lincoln to Antwerp's famous academy (where Waterhouse's own father had once studied) to absorb the latest techniques. From 1878 to 1900, Waterhouse worked at north London's Primrose Hill Studios, where Logsdail also worked in 1882 and again in 1887-92. Logsdail posed Waterhouse and his wife, among other Primrose Hill friends, in several of his large, well-known scenes of London city life, and in his unpublished memoirs Logsdail remembered that the studios' denizens 'formed a happy family, in and out of each others [sic] studios during the day, and in the evening swapping stories over the cards and whisky or dining at 'The Bull and Bush' on Hampstead Heath.' The two men remained friends until at least 1913, when Waterhouse inscribed to Logsdail a volume of his brother-in-law's poetry. 1886 witnessed the establishment of the New English Art Club by younger British artists eager to exhibit paintings reflecting French themes and techniques. Although the Royal Academy is conventionally remembered as opposed to this trend, its president, Frederic Leighton, actually worked hard to enlist younger members who had adopted less extreme practices. Waterhouse was one of these, yet Logsdail-whom the critics praised just as frequently-was bypassed by the Academy for reasons that even he never fully understood. Logsdail and Waterhouse shared a passion for Venice, where the latter spent several summersin the 1880s, including that of 1886. Both men regularly depicted the characteristically striped dresses of Venetian women, the pink strokes of which peek out from under the green robe here. This feature may be one more reason Waterhouse offered the present picture to Logsdail as a gift. It certainly was not intended for exhibition, partly because of its truly bold technique, and partly because it must have been made quickly. In his infamously unorganized way, Waterhouse painted this scene on a board that was upside down; the label glued on its reverse (which shows it was purchased from one of his favourite art suppliers, Lechertier Barbe) is facing the wrong way. This picture, surely, was made 'on the fly' to test the artist's mettleand to please a friend who shared similar aesthetic impulses at an exciting moment in British art history. We are grateful to Peter Trippi for his help in preparing this catalogue entry.
John William Waterhouse - Vain Lamorna, A Study For Lamia

John William Waterhouse - Vain Lamorna, A Study For Lamia

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Lot number: 3
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Artist's sale, Christie's, 23 July 1926, lot 50 as Vain Lamorna to Mr Croal Thomson of Barbizon House, London; William Henry Henderson, 9 Princes Gardens, Westminster and West Woodhay House in Newbury, remaining with him until his death in 1931, when it probably passed to his grandson Johnny Henderson, by whom sold Christie's, 21 December 1950, lot 17 to 'Adam'; Christie's, 8 June 1951, lot 120 to 'M. Morris'; Private collection 3 John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917 VAIN LAMORNA, A STUDY FOR LAMIA inscribed on the stretcher: Vain Lamorina oil on canvas 55 by 74cm., 21¾ by 29in. Estimate 40,000 - 60,000 GBP Print STRUCTURE The canvas has been lined. There are some areas of craquelure, mainly to localised areas on her face and above her head and elsewhere. UNDER ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT Ultraviolet light reveals an opaque varnish. There appear to be two small spots of retouching, one in the figure's hair and the other in the figure's right eyebrow. There are also small areas of retouching to the lower edge probably to repair frame abrasions. FRAME Held in a gilt plaster frame.
John William Waterhouse - The Courtship (sweet Offerings)

John William Waterhouse - The Courtship (sweet Offerings)

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Net Price
Lot number: 112
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John William Waterhouse, RA, RI (British, 1849-1917) The Courtship (Sweet offerings) signed 'J.W.Waterhouse' (lower right) oil on canvas 61 x 31.7cm (24 x 12 1/2in). The present lot is a fascinating rediscovery, epitomizing that moment in the career of J.W. Waterhouse when he had refined his distinctive mode of classical genre painting to a very high standard. The liner that separates this well-preserved canvas from its frame carries the inscriptions 'The Courtship' and 'J.W. Waterhouse RA', both of which were hand-lettered at some point long ago. There is no documentary evidence of a Waterhouse painting titled The Courtship though we know that, throughout his long career, he made many pictures for sale to private collectors which were not publicly exhibited (and thus not documented). Moreover, Waterhouse did not become a full member of the Royal Academy until 1895, by which time he had shifted to more Pre-Raphaelite subject matter. Because the present lot is undated and bears no markings or labels on its reverse, it's place within Waterhouse's oeuvre must instead be established by examining its subject and style. In the summer of 1875, one of Waterhouse's two submissions to the Royal Academy's all-important annual exhibition was Whispered Words . Now known only through a reproductive engraving, this 40 inch-high oil celebrated romantic love, both compositionally and with a poem printed in its catalogue entry. This couple lived some time ago, Perhaps two thousand years or so, Yet I am pretty sure I know Exactly what he said. For it was only Wednesday week My lips were close to Jessie's cheek, When she looked just like this fair Greek, And blushed as rosy red. This verse is apparently Waterhouse's own, since it contains the name of his own sister, Jessie. He identifies the couple as Greek, yet the scene is more believably Pompeian, a cultural setting that fascinated Waterhouse's generation. Moreover, the facial features of 'Jessie' appear not Mediterranean but 'Graeco-West-Kensington,' a useful phrase the painter, critic and collector W. Graham Robertson (1867-1948) coined later to describe the lounging maidens of the English painter Albert Joseph Moore, ARWS (1841-1893). Moore's Aesthetic vision of dolce far niente (sweet idleness) was pervasive in the 1870s and early 1880s, but even more influential on Waterhouse were the archeologically informed scenes of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, OM, RA (1836-1912), the Dutch-born, London-based Royal Academician who had been re-animating Pompeian genre scenes since he first visited that ancient site in 1863. Waterhouse made his first visit to Pompeii in 1877, where he painted detailed watercolour studies of the frescoes and architecture that immediately made their way into the backgrounds of his finished paintings. The young Waterhouse's emulation of Alma-Tadema through such morose Royal Academy submissions as A Sick Child Brought to the Temple of Aesculapius (1877) and The Remorse of Nero after the Murder of His Mother (1878) was duly noted by critics of the time, but they devoted less commentary, if any, to the more charming scenes the young painter produced from the mid 1870s onward. Whispered Words set into motion a wave of gentle Pompeian reveries emanating from Waterhouse's easel, including two versions of Dolce Far Niente (1879 and 1880) and The Household Gods (1880), as well as the present lot. Composed, drawn, painted, and coloured with ever-increasing assurance, these comfortable domestic scenes were readily comprehensible to the upper-middle-class buyers of fine art who visited such venues as the Royal Academy, Dudley Gallery (London), Institute of Oil Painters (London), Royal Birmingham Society of Artists, and Liverpool Autumn Exhibition, not to mention commercial galleries like Agnew's. Many Victorians saw themselves as inheritors of the Roman Empire, and they were fascinated by its material remains, which were still being unearthed on a continuing basis. It was only in 1882, with the presentation of his enormous canvas Diogenes at the Royal Academy (now in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney) that Waterhouse began to apply his classicizing expertise to a more grand scale. There is a strong argument to suggest that the present lot is a painting entitled Sweet Offerings , a previously un-located painting, which was exhibited at the Liverpool Autumn Exhibition in 1882. In 1880, Waterhouse exhibited The Household Gods at the Royal Academy; also known as Offerings to the Gods , the work shows two young women adorning a domestic altar in a late Roman home. The work was bought by Sir John Aird, a prominent London collector who published it in a limited-edition catalogue of his holdings in 1884. Aird also owned Whispered Words , and the two large canvases hung side by side in his drawing room. In 1879, however, Waterhouse had exhibited a smaller oil, Offerings , which shows a young woman daydreaming beside an altar that she has just embellished. This appeared at the less prestigious Dudley Gallery in London priced at just £25. Unlocated and unillustrated until now, Sweet Offerings appeared at the Liverpool Autumn Exhibition in 1882, no.167, with the modest price of £35. By comparison, a year earlier, Waterhouse had sent to Liverpool the much larger A Summer's Day in Greece priced at £120. The insertion of the word 'sweet' is significant; it is unlikely that a figure worshipping her ancestors at a Roman shrine would evoke the word 'sweet', as does the present picture, in which an amorous young man offers fresh narcissi flowers to his beloved. Waterhouse's deft arrangement of their heads and arms intensifies the romantic mood, and the title Sweet Offerings would logically infer, without being vulgar, that the man worships his beloved. All of Waterhouse's characteristic features are here in unusually felicitous combinations: the juxtaposition of a swarthy man with a fair-skinned maiden; the delicate pastel hues of their clothing (especially the coral in her headband, sash, and gown); the bouquet of narcissi (a bloom Waterhouse celebrated throughout his career); the reddish-toned walls, one of which has been painted with the quintessentially Aesthetic sunflower; the potted plants; the magical number of seven birds pecking at grains on the marble floor; and the perspectival recession provided by the view beyond a heavy curtain into a sunny courtyard, by the oil lamp perched in the niche at top left, and by the staircase borrowed from so many Alma-Tadema compositions. Moreover, the outstanding quality of the flesh painting here would logically position this work later in Waterhouse's career, in 1882 when he was 33 rather than, for example, when he was 27. Finally, the signature is absolutely right for Waterhouse in this era, and even the slight (and stable) craquelure visible on the leaves of the potted plant is characteristic of his hand. Because so many paintings from Waterhouse's early career remain unlocated, the rediscovery of this especially fine example is cause for both celebration and enjoyment. We are grateful to Peter Trippi for his assistance in cataloguing this lot. LITERATURE Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J. W. Waterhouse RA 1849-1917 , 1980, cat no.49, p.181. Peter Trippi, J. W. Waterhouse , London, 2002, p.41.
John William Waterhouse - Interior At Pompeii

John William Waterhouse - Interior At Pompeii

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Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 804
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Description:
John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) - Watercolour sketch - "Interior at Pompeii", 8.5ins x 11.75ins, unsigned, in modern walnut and gilt moulded frame and glazed Provenance : By family descent from artist to vendor - Exhibited at The Mappin Art Gallery, Weston Park, Sheffield, 14th October to 19th November 1978, No. 34
John William Waterhouse - A Street In Capri

John William Waterhouse - A Street In Capri

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Gross Price
Lot number: 44
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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) A street in Capri signed and inscribed 'J.W.Waterhouse/Capri' (lower right) and further inscribed 'A Street/in Capri' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas 17½ x 9 1/8 in. (44.5 x 23.2 cm.) John William Waterhouse, R.A. (+); Christie's, London, 23 July 1926, lot 70 (1½ gns to Nicholl, with 'A Venetian Girl'). Born in Rome, Waterhouse felt a natural affinity with Italy, returning at various stages of his career. Largely undiscovered by tourists owing to its inaccessibility, Capri became a mecca for artists owing to its natural beauty. Leighton first visited in 1859, Sargent in 1878, and Waterhouse by 1888. All were struck by the extraordinary quality of the light, recorded by Leighton in a series of oil sketches.
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