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Alexej Von Jawlensky

Russian Federation (18641941 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Alexej Von Jawlensky
JAWLENSKY von Alexej Große Meditation

Villa Grisebach /Jun 4, 2015
70,000.00 - 90,000.00
87,500.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Jawlenski, Von Alexej

 

Artworks in Arcadja
463

Some works of Alexej Von Jawlensky

Extracted between 463 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Alexej Von Jawlensky - Frauenkopf (head Of A Woman)

Alexej Von Jawlensky - Frauenkopf (head Of A Woman)

Original 1913
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Gross Price
Lot number: 28
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Description:
Alexej von Jawlensky 1864 - 1941 FRAUENKOPF (HEAD OF A WOMAN) oil on board 53.3 by 49.8cm. 21 by 19 5/8 in. Painted circa 1913. Authentication The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Jawlensky Committee. Provenance Dr Rusche, Cologne Victor Achter, Mönchengladbach (acquired from the above in 1946) Thence by descent to the present owner Catalogue Note Frauenkopf was painted around 1913, at the height of the artist's involvement with the Blaue Reiter, and is a distillation of the varied stylistic concerns that preoccupied the Alexej von Jawlensky during the early 20th century. Jawlensky would always return to the face as a means to explore the range of human emotion throughout his career. His compositions, even when the models can be identified, are generally titled anonymously so that he could express objectively the power and impact of colour. As the artist himself proclaimed: ‘Human faces are for me only suggestions to see something else in them - the life of colour, seized with a lover's passion’’ (quoted in Clemens Weiler, Jawlensky Heads, Faces, Meditations, London, 1971, p. 12). The present work reflects the stylistic influences that shaped Jawlensky's art and contributed to the development of German Expressionist painting. In 1912, Jawlensky was living in Munich and working closely with a fellow Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky of the independent artist group known as ‘Neue Künstlervereinigung’’. That same year, Kandinsky founded Der Blaue Reiter, an arts periodical that promoted the ideas of this new group and expounded on the value of colour and the aesthetic influences of Eastern European folk art and the religious idolatry of the Russian Orthodox church. Jawlensky was greatly affected by the ideas of his colleagues, and developed his own expressive style of painting using bold colour patches and strong black outlines. Frauenkopf is a stunning example of his new style and exemplifies the ideas and concepts developed by this wave of German Expressionism. Jawlensky's reliance upon colour as a means of visual expression derived from the examples of the Fauve painters working in France in the previous decade. Jawlensky first met these artists, including Matisse and Van Dongen, shortly after the Fauves' premiere exhibition at the Salon d'Automne in 1905. He was inspired by their wild colouration and expressive brushwork, and between 1909 and 1911 the works of these artists had a profound impact on his painting. Like Matisse, who famously remarked, ‘I used colour as a means of expressing my emotion and not as a transcription of nature’’, Jawlensky believed that colour communicated the complex emotions of his subjects (Jacqueline & Maurice Guillaud, Matisse: Rhythm and Line, New York, 1987, p. 24). Another important influence on Jawlensky's painting during this period was the multi-dimensional approach of the Cubists, whose fragmented and highly abstract compositions he had seen in Paris. As Clemens Weiler has noted, ‘Cubism [...] supplied Jawlensky with the means of simplifying, condensing and stylizing the facial form even further, and this simplified and reduced shape he counterbalanced by means of even more intense and brilliant colouring. This enabled him to give these comparatively small heads a monumentality and expressive power that were quite independent of their actual size’’ (C. Weiler, op. cit., p. 105). During the summer of 1911 Jawlensky synthesised his reaction to these artistic movements into a personal and unique artistic expression. As Weiler describes, ‘For him that summer meant the first climax in his creative development. His colours grow as if seen in a state of ecstasy and his shapes are bound powerfully together with broad outlines’’ (ibid., p. 14). Frauenkopf reflects this development, executed with a palette of bright blue, red, yellow and purple tones and rendering the facial features of the model with broad, dynamic brushstrokes. In three-quarter profile, the figure turns her head to the viewer. Her powerful gaze captures our attention, and her bright eyes create a provocative focal point of the entire composition. As Jawlensky once wrote to a prominent art collector: ‘What you feel in front of my paintings is that which you must feel, and so it seems to you that my soul has spoken to yours […] therefore it has spoken’’ (quoted in Alexei Jawlensky: A Centennial Exhibition (exhibition catalogue), Pasadena Art Museum, Pasadena, 1964, p. 22).
Alexej Von Jawlensky - Junges Mädchen

Alexej Von Jawlensky - Junges Mädchen

Original 1906
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Lot number: 212
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Description:
Alexej von Jawlensky 1864 Torschok - 1941 WiesbadenJunges Mädchen. Ca. 1906.Oil on cardboard. Jawlensky/Pieroni-Jawlensky 138. 34,6 x 25 cm (13,6 x 9,8 in). A large part of the collection of the engineer Dr.-Ing. E.h. Max Lütze went into the possession of the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart in 1972. [EH].We are grateful to Mrs. Angelica Jawlensky-Bianconi, Alexej von Jawlensky-Archive S.A., Locarno, for her kind expert advice.PROVENANCE: Lisa Kümmel, Wiesbaden.Private collection.Hanna Bekker vom Rath, Hofheim.Dr. Max Lütze (present from previously mentioned in 1956).Private collection Germany. EXHIBITION: Alexej von Jawlensky. Ölgemälde, exhibition on occasion of the 90th birthday on 26 March, 1954, Kunstkabinett Bekker vom Rath, Frankfurt a.M., 5 April - 29 May, 1954, cat. no. 5, no illu. in cat. (verso with label) and Kunstkabinett Klihm, München 2 - 6 July, 1954, cat. 5, no illu. in cat.Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, inventory no. L 1092, crossed out and with inscription: R. 3.10.1975 (verso with a label). Jawlensky only began his artistic training in 1889 in St. Petersburg after a career as an officer in the tsarist army. He studied under Ilja Repin who introduced him to Marianne von Werefkin and Helene Nesnakomoff, his later wife. Jawlensky accompanied these two to Munich in 1896 where they wanted to visit a private art school. Here Jawlensky met Wassily Kandinsky. The artist undertook several trips to France and was able to show ten paintings at the 'Salon d'automne' with the help of Sergej Djagilev. Jawlensky also met Henri Matisse for the first time.In summer 1908 he worked with Kandinsky, Marianne von Werefkin and Gabriele Münter in Murnau for the first time. There, the four artists developed the idea for the foundation of the 'Neue Künstlervereinigung München' to which they aligned with other artists. In December the first exhibition took place in Munich. Two years later the 'Blauer Reiter' was established as a new idea of co-operation. In 1913 Jawlensky participated in Herwarth Walden's first German autumn Salon in Berlin. When in 1914 world war I began, Jawlensky was expelled from Germany due to his Russian citizenship. He moved with his family and Marianne von Werefkin to Prex on Lake Geneva. And remained in Switzerland until 1921, where he began painting his abstract heads in 1918. His final move to Wiesbaden took place in 1921. An attack of arthritis in 1929 forced the artist to visit various spas at regular intervals. Jawlensky suffered from a progressing paralysis and had difficulties in painting. One year later the painter began the series of small-format 'Meditationen'. 72 of his works were confiscated in 1937 as 'degenerate'. Three years later in 1941 Jawlensky died in Wiesbaden. At the beginning Jawlensky's style was influenced by the Fauves, particularly by Matisse, but the artist soon discovered his own, Expressionist style, which is characterised by strong colors and simple forms. Later he turned to those calm, spiritualised and mystical images of the Human face, which are so typical of Jawlensky.Called up: June 13, 2015 - ca. 14.15 h +/- 20 min.
Alexej Von Jawlensky - Frauenkopf Mit Langen Haaren

Alexej Von Jawlensky - Frauenkopf Mit Langen Haaren

Original 1924
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Lot number: 463
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Description:
Alexei Jawlensky (1864-1941) Description: Alexej von Jawlensky, Frauenkopf mit langen Haaren , Monogrammed lower left: A. J, Watercolour and pencil on a double sheet of paper (front of a folded diary page), 1924, 7 1/8 x 4 3/4 in. Condition Report: Colours slightly attenuated Gerda Schuler Windmueller, Bochum/Richmond / private collection, California
Alexej Von Jawlensky - Große Meditation

Alexej Von Jawlensky - Große Meditation

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 21
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Alexei Jawlensky (1864-1941) Description: Alexej von Jawlensky, Große Meditation , Monogrammed lower left: A. J. Lower right dated illegibly: 3[.], Oil on linen-finish paper, laid down on cardboard, Circa 1936/37, 9 3/4 x 7 3/8 in. Condition Report: Repaired tears Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Venice/Pietrasanta / private collection, Poland (acquired 2002 in the above-mentioned gallery)
Alexej Von Jawlensky - Garten Am Bauernhaus. Verso: Mädchenbildnis

Alexej Von Jawlensky - Garten Am Bauernhaus. Verso: Mädchenbildnis

Original
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Lot number: 204
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Description:
Lot 204: Alexej von Jawlensky, Garten am Bauernhaus. Verso: Mädchenbildnis, Circa 1907 resp. circa 1910 Description: Signed on recto 'A. Jawlensky' in blue lower right. We would like to thank Angelica Jawlensky Bianconi, Alexej von Jawlensky-Archive, Locarno, for kind additional information. The early, intensely coloured landscapes from Wasserburg/ Inn date from 1906/1907 and form a small, distinct group of works within Jawlensky's oeuvre. The present painting was presumably created in or near Wasserburg and depicts a path in front of a farmer's fenced garden, the buildings and sheds of the farm with their red roofs cowering in the middle ground in the midst of the abundant green vegetation. At this point in time the artist was very intensively occupied with contemporary French painting: we can directly feel him opening himself up as an artist to new directions as diverse as Post-Impressionism and Fauvism, to Vincent van Gogh and to Paul Cézanne. We now recognise this in the landscape theme as well - in the specific selection of luminous colours, in their combination, in the loose but directional, rhythmic brushstroke and in the constructed and planar compositional structure. The visual experiences that Jawlensky gathered were exciting and formative, and they remained artistic challenges that he very quickly took up and liberally adopted. The artist's stays in Wasserburg probably date from the spring of 1906, however, they are documented primarily for the summer of 1907 (cf. Angelica Jawlensky Bianconi, Alexej von Jawlensky, Momente eines gelebten Lebens,1864 bis 1914, in: exhib. cat. Horizont Jawlensky, 1900 - 1914, Alexej von Jawlensky im Spiegel seiner künstlerischen Begegnungen, Wiesbaden 2014, p. 289). In terms of their motives, the Wasserburg paintings typically represent simple and unspectacular elements of the rural topography: fields, chains of hills and - as in this case - a rural homestead between paths and groups of trees. However - much as in the case of Pissarro or Cézanne - the formal structure of the painting, the pictorial architecture and the distribution of colour, takes on a new significance beyond the chosen motif and the detail selected from nature. The reverse side, which has been uncovered and features a spectacular portrait of a girl, was created somewhat later and exhibits Jawlensky's mature, individual style that was to reach its culmination in the years 1911/1912. Clemens Weiler has succinctly summarised the artist's development up to that point: “The intensity of colour glowing inside of him had to create a new form for itself. And so he subdued colour through an even more rigorous form. In his old age, he named one of his mediations 'Verhaltene Glut' (Restrained Glow). That was his aim: to tame the glowing colour, not to let it flow, not to permit it to run free. That was his temperament, but perhaps also the fruit of his soldierly upbringing and the legacy of his noble ancestors.” (Clemens Weiler, Alexej Jawlensky, Cologne 1959, p. 74) Jawlensky's painting takes on a decidedly abstract element and he achieves images of an entirely new sort, spontaneous and direct in their conception. Colour and form are brought together and juxtaposed two-dimensionally in the well-known “synthèse”. A strong element is formed by the black utilised - often in the form of a defining contour. It intensifies the effect of the colours and their distinctive “glow” as described by Weiler. The present expressive portrait of a girl is to be grouped with the works of 1910. To name only a few examples, it is stylistically comparable to the painted masterpieces “Nikita” (Museum Wiesbaden) and “Schokko” and also to the portrait “Mädchen mit schwarzem Haar”, which seems to display a physiognomic resemblance to the present “Mädchenbildnis” (cf. M. Jawlensky/ Pieroni-Jawlensky, A. Jawlensky 308, 318, 327). Jawlensky's strongest portraits are characterised by the pyramidal structure that we also find here. The red dress of the child and her greenish pinafore form an almost pedestal-like area that makes up well over half of the painting's surface. The highly expressive head along with the bow, placed on top of it, is obviously cut above at the edge. However, the motif is scarcely constrained by this seemingly arbitrary detail, because the strict frontality of the figure and the gaze of the girl are of such artistic and expressive force that, in viewing the work, we are entirely captivated and are sure to stand by again and again, perfectly mesmerised. 53.5 x 64.5 cm resp. 64.5 x 53.5 cm Circa, 1907 resp. circa 1910 Condition Report: In good, well-kept condition. - The portrait of a girl was formerly overpainted, excluding a 5 cm margin, it was uncovered professionally by the previous owner; with professional, primarily dotted, retouchings in places.
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