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Vincent Van Gogh

(1853 -  1890 ) Wikipedia® : Vincent Van Gogh
GOGH van Vincent Jardin Public À Arles

Sotheby's /Nov 4, 2015
1,335,212.52 - 1,854,461.84
1,435,765.00

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Van Gogh Vincent

 

Artworks in Arcadja
437

Some works of Vincent Van Gogh

Extracted between 437 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Vincent Van Gogh - Old Man Praying

Vincent Van Gogh - Old Man Praying

Original 1882
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Gross Price
Lot number: 343
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Vincent van Gogh 1853 - 1890 OLD MAN PRAYING pencil and brush and ink on paper 66.1 by 52.9cm., 26 by 20 7/8 in. Executed in November-December 1882. Authentication The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Provenance Gallery Oldenzeel, Rotterdam (possibly) W. H. C. Bolleurs, Rotterdam Galerie Otto Wacker, Berlin Franz von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Berlin-Grunewald (acquired from the above in 1927) Acquired from the above by the family of the present owner circa 1960 Exhibited Berlin, Galerie Otto Wacker, Vincent van Gogh, Erste grosse Ausstellung seiner Zeichnungen, 1927, no. 98 Literature Jacob Baart de la Faille, The Works of Vincent van Gogh, His Paintings and Drawings, Amsterdam, 1970, no. F1027, illustrated p. 380 Jan Hulsker, The Complete Van Gogh, Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, Revised and Enlarged Edition of the Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of Vincent van Gogh, Amsterdam, 1996, no. 354, illustrated p. 85 Leo Jansen, Hans Luijten & Nienke Bakker (eds.), The Letters, The Complete Illustrated and Annotated Edition, 1881-1883, London, 2009, vol. II, illustrated p. 326 Catalogue Note Strikingly executed in a monochrome palette Old man praying is Van Gogh at his most psychologically poignant and authentic, and his expressive working is evident, even at this early point in his career, of the artist’’’’s daring manipulation and mastery of his medium. Depicted insistently close to the picture plane, the sitter is portrayed with dramatically lit face and hands, Van Gogh’’’’s subject kneels to pray at the most humble of altars. The result is an unflinchingly intimate and expressive portrait of an ordinary man in a moment of quiet solitude with faith. Executed in late April 1883, when the artist was living in The Hague, Old man praying is a powerful example of Van Gogh’’’’s early portraiture, undoubtedly among the most celebrated aspects of his œuvre. Having had difficulty finding models in his early career, Van Gogh found locals willing to pose for him regularly in The Hague and their everyday work and domestic activities became an important source of inspiration for the artist. Van Gogh sought to depict peasants as if he were an insider. Writing to his brother Theo, the famed Paris-based art dealer, Van Gogh remarked that 'peasants painted by city dwellers inevitably reminded one of the Paris suburbs,' and said that he preferred to live among peasants and share their sober lives (letter 400). On 30 th April 1883, Vincent wrote to report that he had been ‘working on a figure of a woman gathering peat on the heath and a kneeling figure of a man’’’’—almost certainly referring to the present work (letter 338). These expressive portraits of local people, often imbued with an exaggerated sense of isolation, reflect Van Gogh’’’’s own personal sense of solitude during this time. His letters reveal his anguished mental state and he wrote often to implore his brother to visit. Old man praying reflects this loneliness: the heavy, stoical posture of this subject—which is undoubtedly one of the most psychologically affecting of this series—reflects the melancholy of individual human struggle. The thick application of ink and charcoal in broad, deliberate strokes perfectly expresses the hardship of this man’’’’s daily life. These works were a projection of the artist's own internal struggles, a way for him to express his nervous introversion and solitude. According to Jan Hulsker, Van Gogh's intense focus on the studies of these subjects' heads and hands furthermore marks a key transition for the artist. He writes: 'In most of the portraits mentioned here the characterization of the heads is very well done, but what is most noteworthy is that he did things entirely his own way. He was not trying to achieve a romantic idealization of the subjects, but to render them forcefully and realistically, a striving that in a few months would culminate in his famous painting of the Potato Eaters' (J. Hulsker, op. cit., pp. 142 & 144).
Vincent Van Gogh - Landscape With Windswept Trees

Vincent Van Gogh - Landscape With Windswept Trees

Original 1884
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Gross Price
Lot number: 168
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Vincent van Gogh 1853 - 1890 LANDSCAPE WITH WINDSWEPT TREES Oil on paper laid down on panel 13 by 20 1/8 in. 33 by 51 cm Painted in November 1884. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication This work will be included in the new van Gogh catalogue raisonnné being prepared by the Rijksmuseum Vincent van Gogh, Amsterdam. Provenance Oldenzeel Gallery, Rotterdam Daimaru, Japan Private Collection, Japan (acquired from the above in the 1960s) Thence by descent Exhibited Rotterdam, Oldenzeel Gallery, Van Gogh, 1903 Literature Jacob Baart de la Faille, L'Oeuvre de Vincent Van Gogh, Catalogue raisonné, tableaux, vol. II, Paris, 1928, no. 196, illustrated pl. LIII Jan Hulsker, The New Complete Van Gogh, Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, Amsterdam, 1996, illustrated p. 211 Catalogue Note The nearly two years spent in Nuenen, in the southern Netherlands, were very productive in van Gogh’’s early artistic career. The present work was painted in 1885, at the very end of this period, just before his departure for Antwerp; his celebrated masterpiece De Aardappeleters (The Potato Eaters), now in the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, was painted at this same time. In March of 1885, van Gogh’’s father, the Reverend Theodorus van Gogh, collapsed on the threshold of the family home, where the artist still lived. The experience was profoundly influential on this transitional period in van Gogh’’s oeuvre. By May, following his father’’s death, the artist left the parsonage and rented a small studio and sleeping quarters on his own in town. “I have lately been making some studies of the fall landscape outdoors,” wrote van Gogh in October of 1885 (quoted in Jan Hulsker, op. cit., p. 208). The works created in October and November of this year, the present painting included, are all the more poignant and emotive when considered in context of the changes the artist experienced during this year, and the looser application of paint that defines the foliage prefigures the more fiercely dramatic brushwork so characteristic of his later pictures. Fig. 1 Vincent Van Gogh, Autumn Landscape with Four Trees , 1885, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo, Netherlands See More See Less
Vincent Van Gogh - Paysage Sous Un Ciel Mouvementé

Vincent Van Gogh - Paysage Sous Un Ciel Mouvementé

Original 1889
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 14
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Description:
Vincent van Gogh 1853 - 1890 PAYSAGE SOUS UN CIEL MOUVEMENTÉ Oil on canvas 23 3/4 by 29 in. 60. 5 by 73.7 cm Painted in Arles in mid-April 1889. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Provenance Theo van Gogh, Paris (the artist's brother; acquired July 15, 1889) Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Amsterdam (widow of the above; inherited in 1891) Dr. Willem J. Leuring, The Hague (acquired from the above in 1901 and until at least 1905) Galerie Druet, Paris (in 1908) (possibly) Amedée Schuffenecker, Meudon (possibly) Galerie E. Blot, Paris Marczell von Nemes, Budapest (acquired before 1912 and sold: Paris, Hotel Drouot, November 21, 1918, lot 45) P. Voûte Jr., Amsterdam Galerie Johann N. H. Eisenloeffel, Amsterdam Harry S. Southam, Ottawa (1928 and until at least 1934) W. Scott & Son, Montreal (acquired from the above) Alex. Reid and Lefevre (The Lefevre Gallery), London & Bignou Gallery, New York (probably acquired from the above by 1938 and until circa 1944) Galerie Moos, Geneva (acquired by 1948) Acquired from the above by 1955 Exhibited The Hague, Kunstkring, 1892, no. 29 Rotterdam, Oldenzeel, 1904, no. 67 Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, 1905, no. 154 Paris, Galerie Barbazanges, Centenaire de la peinture francaise, 1928 Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada; Toronto, Toronto Art Gallery & Montreal, Art Association, French Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, 1934, no. 61, illustrated in the catalogue New York, Bignou Gallery, London, Alex. Reid and Lefevre (The Lefevre Gallery), The Tragic Painters, 1938, no. 3 (New York) and no. 41 (London), illustrated in the catalogue (dated March 1890) Bristol, Royal Hotel, French Painting of the 19th and 20th Centuries, 1938, no. 38 New York, Bignou Gallery, Significant Landmarks of Nineteenth Century French Paintings, 1939, no. 10, illustrated in the catalogue London, Alex. Reid and Lefevre (The Lefevre Gallery), Milestones in French Painting, 1939, no. 16, illustrated in the catalogue (dated March 1890) New York, Bignou Gallery, The Post Impressionists, 1940, no. 10 Houston, McMillen Gallery, Vincent Van Gogh and other famous French Painters, 1941, no. 6, illustrated on the cover New York, Bignou Gallery, Ancient Chinese and Modern European Paintings, 1943, no. 27 Antwerp, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Kunst van Heden, 1955, no. 172 Martigny, Fondation Pierre Gianadda, Van Gogh, 2000, no. 74, illustrated in color in the catalogue Vienna, Albertina, Van Gogh, Heartfelt Lines, 2008, no. 102, illustrated in color in the catalogue Kunstmuseum Basel, Vincent van Gogh, Zwischen Erde und Himmel, Die Landschaften, 2009, no. 48, illustrated in color in the catalogue Denver Art Museum, Becoming van Gogh, 2012, no. 82, illustrated in color in the catalogue Madrid, Museu Thyssen-Bornemisza, Impressionism and Open-Air Painting, From Corot to Van Gogh, 2013 Paris, Musée d'Orsay, Van Gogh, Artaud. Le suicidé de la société, 2014, no. 43, illustrated in color in the catalogue Martigny, Fondation Pierre Gianadda, 1997-2015 (on loan) Literature Druet Photo, 1914, no. 3316 The Complete Letters of Vincent van Gogh, New York, 1958, LT 584 & 600; B3 Julius Meier-Graefe, Vincent, Munich 1922, vol. II, illustrated pl. 26 Victor Doiteau & Edgard Leroy, La folie de Van Gogh, Paris, 1928, illustrated p. 113 Jacob Baart de la Faille, L'oeuvre de Vincent van Gogh, Catalogue Raisonné, Paris & Brussels, 1928, no. 575, illustrated Julius Meier-Graefe, Vincent Van Gogh, New York, 1933, illustrated pl. 17 Clarence J. Bulliet, The Significant Moderns and their Pictures, New York, 1936, illustrated pl. 64 Willem Scherjon & W. Josiah de Gruyter, Vincent van Gogh's Great Period: Arles, Saint Rémy and Auvers-sur-Oise (Complete Catalogue), Amsterdam, 1937, no. 100, illustrated p. 129 (titled Meadow Spangled with Dandelions) George Slocombe, Rebels of Art, New York, 1939, illustrated pl. 20 Jacob-Baart de la Faille & Charles Terrasse, Vincent van Gogh, 1939, no. 585 (F.575), illustrated p. 406 (titled Landscape Under a Stormy Sky) Art Digest, New York, March 1, 1939, illustrated Art News, New York, November 15, 1942, illustrated p. 14 Louis Hautecoeur, Van Gogh, Monaco, 1946, illustrated p. 92 Jacob-Baart de la Faille, The Works of Vincent van Gogh, his Paintings and Drawings, Amsterdam, 1970, no. 575, illustrated p. 240 (titled Landscape Under a Stormy Sky) Paolo Lecaldano, Tout l’’oeuvre peint de Van Gogh, Paris, 1971, vol. II, no. 496, illustrated p. 207 Jan Hulsker, The Complete van Gogh, Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, Amsterdam, 1977, no. 1422, illustrated p. 322 Ronald Pickvance, Van Gogh in Saint-Rémy and Auvers, New York, 1986, illustrated pp. 293 & 295 Van Gogh in Saint-Rémy and Auvers (exhibition catalogue), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1986, illustrated p. 295 Ingo F. Walther & Rainer Metzger, Vincent van Gogh, Sämtliche Gemälde, Cologne, 1989, vol. II , illustrated in color p. 338 (French edition, 1994, ditto) (titled Landscape Under a Stormy Sky) Jan Hulsker, The Complete van Gogh, Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, Amsterdam, 1996, no. 1422, illustrated p. 322 Fondation Pierre Gianadda, ed., Collection Louis et Evelyn Franck, Zurich, 1998, illustrated in color p. 51 Leo Jansen, Hans Luijten & Nienke Bakker, eds., The Letters, The Complete Illustrated and Annotated Edition, Arles, 1888-1889, vol. IV, Brussels, 2009, illustrated in color p. 429 Walter Feilchenfeldt, Vincent van Gogh, The Years in France, Complete Paintings 1886-1890, London, 2013, illustrated in color p. 179 Catalogue Note Van Gogh's dramatically atmospheric Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé is one of the finest of the artist's Arles landscapes. Painted amidst the most fruitful period of the artist's career, when his canvases were flooded with rich passages of densely-painted color, the composition depicts a verdant field under threat of an explosive rainstorm. Van Gogh creates a scene of intense anticipation here, replete with psychological drama as the laborers hurry to finish their work before the heavens rain down upon them. This painting was completed only two months before Van Gogh executed what is arguably his most celebrated work, The Starry Night, now in the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé can be considered the thundering precursor to the MoMA picture and the first act of Van Gogh's grand celestial exploration. Both of these paintings celebrate the majestic beauty of nature and the uncontrollable and often turbulent forces that shaped Van Gogh's world. In his analysis of Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé, Sjraar van Heugten discusses the events that led to Van Gogh's completion of this important painting in April of 1889: "This Provençal landscape of a meadow in Spring is among the last paintings which Van Gogh made in the countryside near Arles. Known by the title, Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé, as well as Meadows, it was painted in the first half of April 1889, just a few weeks before Van Gogh would leave Arles and admit himself to the asylum of Saint-Paul-de Mausole in Saint-Remy. During his Dutch years (1881-1885), Van Gogh’’s main goal had been becoming a painter of the human figure, following in the footsteps of painters like Jean-François Millet, Jules Breton and Joseph Israëls. But even in that period, his landscape paintings and drawings show his unusual talent for that genre. In the South of France, where he found an abundance of motives in nature, this capacity would lead to an astonishing number of masterpieces. Van Gogh had arrived in Arles on February 20, 1888. After two years in Paris (early 1886-early 1888) he had grown very tired of urban life. He wanted to go to Marseille, but decided to go to Arles first, to recuperate in rural surroundings and a mild climate. Soon, Arles and the Provençal countryside turned out to be a treasure trove of inspiration, and Van Gogh would never go to Marseille. In Paris he had discovered Japanese art and in the South he hoped to find the same harmony, color and light that he had observed in Japanese Ukiyo-e prints. He was not disappointed. He had high hopes that he could persuade other avant-garde artists to come to Arles and establish an artists community, ‘A Studio of the South’’. Upon arrival - and to his dismay - he had found Arles covered under some 60 cm of snow. During the first weeks he had few chances of working outside, but the weather finally turned on 10 March. He then set off to produce a long series of flowering orchards. During his two years in Paris, Van Gogh worked hard to change his stylistic approach and dark palette into a modern way of painting with strong, vibrant colors. He had studied Impressionism, the works of the young avant-garde, Japanese art, and a broad range of other artists. His understanding of color theories became profound. He experimented with several techniques, such as the Neo-Impressionist’’s dots and strokes, and the almost draughtsman-like brushstroke of the peinture à l’’essence, painted with very thin paint. He found that working in a heavy impasto suited him best and allowed him to work in a lively and expressive manner. These achievements came together in Arles, where Van Gogh developed his singular modern idiom fully. The bright light and remarkable colors of the South were ideally suited for his coloristic talents. Van Gogh sought to make truly modern figure pieces, and some of the figures and portraits he painted in Arles are among the best in his oeuvre. But the landscape painter in him was greatly inspired by the nature of the South, and his achievements in that genre are amongst the most radical innovations in the history of art. After his spring campaign of flowering orchards, summer followed with the harvest of the wheat, one of Van Gogh's favorite motifs. Autumn landscapes and parks were attacked with equal vigor. On October 23, 1888, after having postponed several times, Paul Gauguin arrived in Arles to join Van Gogh, who by now lived and worked in the Yellow House. Van Gogh had high hopes that his studio in the South would indeed be realized, since he saw Gauguin as the de facto leader in such a community. For many weeks the artists worked well together, inspiring each other and exchanging artistic insights. However, their preferences and temperaments clashed, and at the end of December a fierce discussion got out of hand. During what was probably a first attack of his illness, Van Gogh cut off a part of his left earlobe and had to be hospitalized. Gauguin left Arles on December 25 and Van Gogh's dream of a studio of young artists was shattered. Van Gogh's last four months in Arles were marked by problems and incidents. People from the neighborhood around the Yellow House turned against him and in the end he had to leave. Due to attacks of his illness he returned to the hospital several times and stayed there for weeks. In April 1889, when he was again staying in the hospital, he felt well enough to go outside and paint the Spring landscape. In a letter of mid April he asks Theo to send him a large batch of paint, adding: ‘I have 6 spring studies, including two large orchards. It’’s very urgent, because these effects are so fleeting.’’ [758][1] One of these studies was Meadows (the present work). Van Gogh mentions the painting three times in his letter, but does not comment on it. It is, however, very tempting to see a reflection in it of Van Gogh’’s feelings during those days filled with worry. At the beginning of April, Van Gogh had written to Theo: ‘I’’m well these days, apart from a certain vague background sadness that’’s hard to define.’’ [754] At the end of the month he wrote to his sister Willemien that he had suffered four attacks of his illness over the past months and he is worried about the future: ‘It’’s very likely that I have a lot more to suffer'...‘I can’’t precisely describe what the thing I have is like, there are terrible fits of anxiety sometimes – without any apparent cause – or then again a feeling of emptiness and fatigue in the mind.’’ [764] Van Gogh’’s melancholy mood found his way into some of his works. In that same letter he describes a view of the courtyard of the hospital which he painted: ‘[…] it’’s a painting chock-full of flowers and springtime greenery. However, three black, sad tree-trunks cross it like snakes, and in the foreground four large sad, dark box bushes.’’ On May 3 he writes to Theo that he made a drawing of a weeping tree ‘which became very dark and quite melancholic for springtime.’’ [768] In Meadows, Van Gogh possibly wants to convey this sentiment. With its cheery field with flowers it is clearly a spring scene. A man and a woman to the left are out for a stroll. She is bending over, probably to pick some flowers. Van Gogh often added such couples to compositions to give the image a touch of human romance and a feeling of consolation. The landscape and the figures are painted in a quick but careful way, and the colors are bright and lively. The heavy gray clouds in the blue sky are highly unusual in Van Gogh’’s work from Arles. They are painted with a thick brush in forceful and expressive strokes, and are in contrast with the lightness of the lower part of the painting. They may have been included to evoke the feeling of melancholy that had Van Gogh in its grip. It gives the painting a strong personal touch and makes it a moving testimony of the painter’’s life during that late period in Arles. Ronald Pickvance has suggested a possible location for this scene, but the landscape contains so few identifying topographical clues that any certainty seems impossible.[2] The painting was mainly done in one session with possibly some added touches in the next days. Van Gogh painted on a standard size canvas, a so-called toile de 20 figure. Like many contemporary artists in France, Van Gogh bought standard size canvases or cut canvas from a role to fit standard size frames. They came in three categories, paysage, marine and figure and the number referred to the price in sous that they cost when the system was introduced. A toile de 20 figure measures 73 x 60 cm. Van Gogh usually bought his canvases pre-primed. When Van Gogh left Arles, he had to leave some of his work behind. In the first half of July 1889, he went from Saint-Rémy to Arles to pick up canvases and on 15 or 16 July he sent 11 paintings to Theo by train, Meadows (the present work) amongst them" (Sjraar van Heugten in correspondence with Sotheby's, October 2015). [1] The letter numbers refer to Leo Jansen, Hans Luijten and Nienke Bakker, Vincent van Gogh – The Letters. The Complete Illustrated and Annotated Edition, Amsterdam etc. 2009. See also the online edition, with more extensive annotation: vangoghletters.org. [2] Pickvance 2000, no. 74, p. 307, see literature Sotheby's is grateful to Sjraar van Heugten for writing the catalogue note for the present lot. Fig. 1 Vincent van Gogh, Nature morte , vase aux marguerites et coquelicots, 1890, oil on canvas, sold: Sotheby’’’’s, New York, November 4, 2014, lot 17 for $61,765,000 Fig. 2 Vincent van Gogh, L’’’’Allée des Alyscamps , 1888, oil on canvas, sold: Sotheby’’’’s, New York, May 5, 2015, lot 18 for $65,330,000 Fig. 3 Vincent van Gogh, A Starry Night , June 1889, The Museum of Modern Art, New York Fig. 4 Vincent van Gogh, Peach Blossom in the Crau , 1889, oil on canvas, Courtauld Institute of Art, London Fig. 5 Vincent van Gogh, Orchard in Bloom with View of Arles , 1889 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Fig. 6 Vincent van Gogh, Orchard in Blossom with a View of Arles , 1889, Neue Pinakothek, Munich Fig. 7 Vincent van Gogh, The courtyard of the Hospital in Arles , 1889, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam Fig. 8 Vincent van Gogh, A garden in the Place Lamartine (Weeping tree in the grass) , 1889, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Fig. 9 Theo van Gogh in 1889 See More See Less
Vincent Van Gogh - Jardin Public À Arles

Vincent Van Gogh - Jardin Public À Arles

Original 1888
Estimate:

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Gross Price
Lot number: 2
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Description:
Vincent van Gogh 1853 - 1890 JARDIN PUBLIC À ARLES Pen and ink on paper 5 1/4 by 6 1/2 in. 13.3 by 16.5 cm Drawn in September 1888. Please note that in the print catalogue for this sale, this lot appears as number 2T Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication This authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Provenance Theo van Gogh, Paris (the artist's brother) Lutz Art Gallery, Berlin Dr. Gottlieb Friedrich Reber, Barmen Max Silberberg, Breslau (spoilated by the German Government in the 1930s) Sale: Paul Graupe & Cie, Berlin, Gemälde und Zeichnungen des 19. Jahrhunderts aus einer bekannten schlesischen Privatsammlung und aus verschiedenem Privatbesitz, March 23, 1935, lot 38 (as Parkskizze) William A. Coolidge, London & Boston Mrs. Edward Gage, London (sold: Sotheby's, London, December 3, 1958, lot 47) Private Collection, Europe (acquired at the above sale) European Foundation (a bequest from the above and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 13, 1997, lot 105) Acquired at the above sale by A. Alfred Taubman Exhibited Paris, Galerie A. Vollard, Paintings and Drawings by Vincent van Gogh, 1896-97 London, The Leicester Galleries, Paintings, Drawings, Sculpture and Prints by Modern Artists, 1936, no. 165 New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Van Gogh in Arles, 1984, no. 107, illustrated in color in the catalogue Literature Alfred Vallette, Mercure de France, 1894, no. 57, illustrated p. 21 Vincent van Gogh, Lettres de Vincent van Gogh à Émile Bernard, Paris, 1911, illustrated pl. LIII Jacob Baart de la Faille, L'Oeuvre de Vincent van Gogh: Catalogue Raisonné, vol. 3, Paris & Brussels, 1928, no. 1465, catalogued pp. 141-142; vol. 4, illustrated pl. CLX Jacob Baart de la Faille, The Works of Vincent van Gogh: His Paintings and Drawings, New York, 1970, no. F. 1465, illustrated p. 511 Charles Millard, 'A Chronology of Van Gogh's Drawings', Master Drawings, vol. XII, 1974, no. 2, discussed pp.156-165 and illustrated p. 161 Jan Hulsker, The Complete van Gogh: Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, New York, 1980, no. 1583, illustrated p. 363 (titled Round Clipped Shrub in the Public Garden) Ronald Pickvance, Van Gogh in Arles (exhibition catalogue), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1984, illustrated in color p. 181 Johannes van der Wolk, Ronald Pickvance & E.B.F. Pey, Vincent van Gogh: Drawings (exhibition catalogue), Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, 1990, illustrated p. 238 Jacob Baart de la Faille, Vincent van Gogh, the Complete Works on Paper, Catalogue Raisonné, San Francisco, 1992, vol. I, no. F. 1465, catalogued pp. 141-142, p. 381; vol. II, illustrated pl. CLX Jan Hulsker, The New Complete van Gogh Paintings, Drawings, Sketches, Philadelphia, 1996, no. 1583, illustrated p. 363, (as Round Clipped Shrub in the Public Garden) Ronald Pickvance, Van Gogh (exhibition catalogue), Fondation Pierre Gianadda, Martigny, 2000, illustrated in color p. 80 Van Gogh and Britain: Pioneer Collectors (exhibition catalogue), Compton Gallery, London & Dean Gallery, Edinburgh, 2006, illustrated in color p. 122 Van Gogh and Expressionism (exhibition catalogue), Neue Galerie, New York, 2007, illustrated in color p. 2007 Der Expressionistische Impuls: Meisterwerke aus Wuppertals grossen Privatsammlungen (exhibition catalogue), Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, 2008, illustrated in color p. 109 Leo Jansen, Hans Luijten & Nienke Bakker, eds., Vincent van Gogh, The Letters, The Complete Illustrated and Annotated Edition, Volume 4: Arles, 1888-1889, London, 2009, illustrated in color p. 289 (illustration is reversed) Catalogue Note The subject of this drawing is the public garden in the Place Lamartine which Van Gogh could see from the Yellow House. In his comments on another drawing from the same series Ronald Pickvance made the observation that "the feathery round bulk, prominently placed in the small garden, was to attract Van Gogh more than any other single natural form during his stay in Arles. It recurs in some ten paintings and drawings (including those done in letters)" (R. Pickvance, Van Gogh in Arles [exhibition catalogue], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1984, p. 64). In the first paintings of the garden done in July, Garden with Weeping Tree (de la Faille 428 - Private Collection, Zurich), the trees and bushes are pushed to the edges, placing the emphasis on "the lawn just cut with long trails of hay drying in the sun" (Letter to Theo 508). Van Gogh painted another view of the garden in September, Public Garden with Weeping Tree: Poet's Garden (de la Faille 468 - The Art Institute of Chicago). In this painting van Gogh intensified the colors, inspired by the realization that he was seeing the same cypresses and meadows that Petrarch had seen in Avignon. The present drawing is a study for the latter and was enclosed in a letter to Theo Van Gogh written on September 17, 1888. He described the composition at length in this letter: "Since seven o'clock this morning I have been sitting in front of something which after all is no great matter, a clipped round bush of cedar or cypress growing amid grass. You already know this clipped round bush, because you have had a study of the garden. Enclosed is also a sketch of my canvas, again a square size 30. The bush is green, touched a little with bronze and various other tints. The grass is bright, bright green, malachite touched with citron, and the sky is bright, bright blue. The row of bushes in the background are all oleanders, raving mad; the blasted things are flowering so riotously they may well catch locomotor ataxia. They are loaded with fresh flowers, and quantities of faded flowers as well, and their green is continually renewing itself in fresh, strong shoots, apparently inexhaustibly. A funeral cypress is standing over them, and some small figures are sauntering along a pink path. This makes a pendant to another size 30 canvas of the same spot, only from a totally different angle, in which the whole garden is in quite different greens, under a sky of pale citron. But isn't it true that this garden has a fantastic character which makes you quite able to imagine the poets of the Renaissance, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, strolling among these bushes and over the flowery grass? It is true that I have left out some trees, but what I have kept in the composition is really there just as you see it. Only it has been overcrowded with some shrubs which are not in character. And to get at that character, the fundamental truth of it: that's three times now that I've painted the same spot. It happens to be the garden just in front of my house. But this corner of the garden is a good example of what I was telling you, that to get at the real character of things here, you must look at them and paint them for a long time. Perhaps you will see nothing from the sketch except that the line is now very simple. This picture is again painted very thickly, like its pendant with the yellow sky." There is another drawing of the same site much more schematic in van Gogh's letter of October 2 to Eugène Bloch (letter 553 B). Although smaller than the other four drawings of the public garden, the present sheet is densely worked and displays the full range of Van Gogh's graphic signs. A Park in Arles was once in the collection of Max Silberberg (1878-1942), an industrialist based in Breslau and the owner of one of the finest pre-war collections of 19th and 20th century art in Germany. Alongside other magnificent examples of classic French Impressionism by Manet, Monet, Pissarro and Sisley, Silberberg also collected masterpieces of Realism and Post-Impressionism including several works by Delacroix and Courbet alongside paintings by Cézanne and Van Gogh. A prominent member of the community and a generous patron of Jewish causes, by 1935 Silberberg was forced to relinquish his public roles, his company was Aryanised and sold, and his house was acquired by the S.S. His wonderful collection, including the present work, was sold off at auction in Berlin. Presently, this drawing is sold with the benefit of a settlement agreement between the heir of Max Silberberg and the current owner that ensures clear title will pass to the buyer. Fig. 1 Vincent van Gogh, The Poet’’’’s Garden , oil on canvas, September 1888, The Art Institute of Chicago See More See Less
Vincent Van Gogh - Head Of A Peasant Woman

Vincent Van Gogh - Head Of A Peasant Woman

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Description: Vincent van Gogh, Head of a Peasant Woman: Right Profile ( Kopf einer Bäuerin: Profil nach rechts ) Oil on canvas. Relined, Circa 1884/85, 16 1/8 x 12 in. Condition Report: Minor retouchings Vincent van Gogh (left with the family in Nuenen) / Anna Cornelia van Gogh-Carbentus, sister of the artist, Nuenen/Breda (1885-86) / Adrianus ("Janus“) Schrauwen, Breda (1886-1902) / Jan C. Couvreur, Breda (1902) / W. Van Bakel and Cornelius Hendrikus Wilhelmus ("Kees“) Mouwen jr., Breda (1902-03) / Kunstzalen Oldenzeel, Rotterdam (1903) / Gerlacus ("Gerlach“) Ribbius Peletier jr., Utrecht (acquired at Oldenzeel in the February of 1903, until 1930) / Adriana Louisa Ribbius Peletier-Wijbelingh, wife of the previous owner, Utrecht (acquired by descent 1930, until 1939) / Louise J. Schokking-Ribbius Peletier, daughter the previous owner, Doorn (acquired by descent 1939, until approx. 1959) / Galerie E. J. Van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam (acquired approx. 1959) / Olive Hosmer, Montreal (acquired [before] 1960) / John H. Shuter, nephew the previous owner, Beaconsfield, Québec/Montreal (acquired after 1970) / Galerie Nathan, Zurich / private collection, southern Germany/Great Britain (acquired at Nathan in 1984) Exhibited: Vincent van Gogh. Rotterdam, Kunstzalen Oldenzeel, 1903, no. 4 / Canada collects. European Painting 1860–1960. Montreal, Museum of Fine Arts, 1960, cat. no. 153, ill. p. 51 Literature: J(acob)-B(aart) de la Faille: L’’’’Œuvre de Vincent van Gogh. Catalogue raisonné. 4 vols. Paris/Brüssel, Les Éditions G. van Oest, 1928, here vol. 1: cat. no. 144, vol. 2: ill. pl. XL ( „Paysanne brabançonne“, canvas on wood) / Walther Jan Clemens Vanbeselaere: De Hollandsche periode (1880–1885) in het werk van Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890). Antwerpen, De Sikkel, 1937 (= Diss. 1934), p. 290, no. 144 (canvas on wood), p. 341f. / J(acob)-B(aart) de la Faille: Vincent van Gogh. Paris, Hyperion, 1939, cat. no. 154, with ill. („Bäuerin aus Brabant“, oil on wood) / Jan Hulsker: Van Gogh en zijn weg. Het complete werk. Amsterdam, Meulenhoff International, 1978, cat. no. 561, with ill. („Boerenvrouw, kop“, canvas on wood) / Ingo F. Walther/Rainer Metzger: Vincent van Gogh. Sämtliche Gemälde, vol. 1: Etten, April 1881 – Paris, Februar 1888. Cologne, Benedikt Taschen Verlag, 1989, ill. p. 68 („Kopf einer Bäuerin mit weißer Haube“) / Louis van Tilborgh und Marije Vellekoop: Van Gogh in Utrecht. The Collection of Gerlach Ribbius Peletier (1856–1930). In: Van Gogh Museum Journal 1997-1998, p. 26-41, here p. 28, ill. 2 (photo of the living room of the Ribbius Peletier family in Utrecht, 1903-04, our painting left on an easel), p. 30, p. 33, ill. 6 (paintings in the living room of the Ribbius Peletier family in Utrecht by Elsie Spronck, 1932, our painting back right over the door), p. 34 and p. 36, no. 2, with ill. („Head of a woman“, oil on canvas on wood) / Martha Op de Coul: In search of Van Gogh’’’’s Nuenen studio: the Oldenzeel exhibitions of 1903. In: Van Gogh Museum Journal 2002, p. 113, no. 4
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