Cy Twombly

United States (Lexington 19282011 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Cy Twombly
TWOMBLY Cy Untitled

Sotheby's /Oct 18, 2014
253,004.38 - 379,506.56
291,582.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
710

Some works of Cy Twombly

Extracted between 710 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Cy Twombly - Virgilus

Cy Twombly - Virgilus

Original 1976
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Lot number: 385
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Cy Twombly B.1928 SIX LATIN WRITERS AND POETS APPOLLODORO; AND SIX LATIN WRITERS AND POETS VIRGILUS (BASTIAN 64, 66) Two lithographs printed in colors, with embossing, from the portfolio of seven, 1976, each initialed in pencil on the verso and numbered 30/60, on Richard de Bas handmade paper, published by Propyläen Verlag, Berlin, framed (2 prints) images: 328 by 252mm 12 7/8 by 9 7/8 in sheets: approx. 648 by 502mm 25 1/2 by 19 7/8 in The prints are in good condition and with full margins. The sheets are slightly toned with soft rippling. The occasional pale fox mark and minor surface soiling at extreme sheet edges. Framed "In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."
Cy Twombly - Untitled, From On The Bowery

Cy Twombly - Untitled, From On The Bowery

Original 1969
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Lot number: 60
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Description:
Cy Twombly Untitled, from On the Bowery , 1969-71 Screenprint in colors, on Schollers Parole paper, the full sheet, S. 25 1/2 x 25 1/2 in. (64.8 x 64.8 cm) signed and numbered 25/100 in pencil on the reverse (there were also 20 artist's proofs), published by Edition Domberger, Stuttgart (with their blindstamp), unframed. Heiner Bastian 27
Cy Twombly - Roman Notes Iv, From Roman Notes

Cy Twombly - Roman Notes Iv, From Roman Notes

Original 1970
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Lot number: 207
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Description:
CY TWOMBLY (1928-2011) Roman Notes IV, from Roman Notes offset lithograph in colors, 1970, on heavy offest paper, signed in pencil on the reverse, numbered 77/100 (there were also 10 artist's proofs), published by Neuendorf Verlag, Hamburg, the full sheet, the colors attenuated, the sheet adhered to the support the reverse sheet edges, otherwise generally in good condition, framed Sheet: 34 ¼ x 27 ½ in. (870 x 699 mm.) Bastian 24
Cy Twombly - Untitled

Cy Twombly - Untitled

Original 1976
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Gross Price
Lot number: 158
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Cy Twombly 1928-2011 UNTITLED pencil, watercolour, crayon, waxed paper and cellophane tape on paper 143.5 by 105.4cm.; 56 1/2 by 41 1/2 in. Executed in 1976. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Leo Castelli Gallery, New York Private Collection, New York Sale: Sotheby's, New York, Contemporary Art, 18 November 1999, Lot 263 Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Leo Castelli Gallery, Cy Twombly - Watercolours, 1976 Literature Yvon Lambert, Catalogue Raisonné des Oeuvres sur Papier de Cy Twombly, Vol. VI, 1973-1976, Milan 1979, p. 163, no. 174, illustrated in colour Executed in May 1976 on Captiva Island, Cy Twombly’’s Untitled is the first work from a suite of nine that the artist produced in Robert Rauschenberg’’s studio. In its signature juxtaposition of haphazard handwriting, urgent mark-making and an expressive painterly language, the work epitomises Cy Twombly’’s unique formal vocabulary in which the boundaries between painting and writing have been obliterated in favour of a semantic unity of sign and form. Inspired by Edmund Spenser’’s (1552-1599) poem The Shephaerdes Calender, in which a country boy mourns his unfortunate love for Rosalinde, Cy Twombly has taken three lines from the first month of the calendar, in which the protagonist Colin Cloute compares his misfortunes to the sad season of the year. So deep-felt is his despair over Rosalinde that he shatters his pipe and casts himself to the ground, as is indeed legible in the last three lines of the penultimate verse that the artist has scribbled down: My musing mynd, yet canst not, when thou should: Both pype and Muse, shall sore the while abye. So broke his oaten pype, and downe dyd lye. By condensing Spenser’’s poem to the finale of the tale, Cy Twombly has not only captured its essence in three lines of a verse, but has also dramatically singled out the source of the protagonist’’s sorrow. Visibly enlarging the word Muse at the centre of the text, the artist emphasises the content of the poem through his expressive handwriting. Beautifully illuminating the eloquent visual poetry that characterises Twombly’’s best work, Untitled resolves the form and content of Spenser’’s poem through the artist’’ s direct writing. Echoing this synthesis of the story and its representation, the two fields of pale green watercolour below the text are separated through their material supports, each having its own sheet of paper - and therefore reflecting the same sense of disconnectedness in the poem. Twombly’’s reference to Spenser is not only the result of his interest in poetry, but may also be an auto-biographical reference. Since the artist had a relationship with Robert Rauschenberg in the early 1950s, the fact that this work was executed in the latter’’s studio might reveal a more personal dimension to the story. Twombly's fascinating concoction of sources and references, alongside his iconic juxtaposition of language, scribbles and abstract painting, reveals Untitled as a profound meditation on the expressive possibilities of text and image. Fig. 1 Claude Monet, Haystacks, end of Summer , 1981, Musée dOrsay, Paris
Cy Twombly - Untitled

Cy Twombly - Untitled

Original 1971
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Gross Price
Lot number: 28
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Description:
Cy Twombly 1928 - 2011 UNTITLED signed and dated 71 on the reverse pencil, oil pastel and watercolour on two pieces of card laid down on board 84.5 by 69.2cm.; 33 1/4 by 27 1/4 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication This work is recorded in the Archives of the Cy Twombly Foundation. Provenance Galleria d'Arte Emilio Mazzoli, Modena Alessandro Grassi, Milan (acquired directly from the above in 1983) Thence by descent to the present owner Literature Achille Bonito Oliva, Collezione Privata, Milan 1993, p. 60, illustrated in colour Following the rococo exuberance of his works from the late fifties and early sixties, which produced numerous pieces based on violent or erotic mythological subjects, in this untitled work, Cy Twombly returns to a more rarefied mode of depiction, shedding all but the most fundamental elements of his style to create a more considered work. In its reconciliation between text and abstractionist mark-making, and its use of eclectic source material, Untitled (1971) is typically Twombly and a prime example of some of the most celebrated aspects of his oeuvre. In keeping with the best works of this period, Untitled is a gestural piece at its core. From the measured drawn out horizontal lines, to the cursive semi-legible header and footer, each mark he makes on the grey ground is inextricably linked to its creation. The mood of this work is dominated by the counterpoint between the horizontal lines that blanket the work in swathed numbness and the spidery snippets of text that snag on their surroundings. However, if these contrasting modes of depiction share one quality, it is that they are action-focussed – their appearance unmistakably reveals the intervention of the artist. Twombly’’s mark “shares with broken branches in the forest or clues left at the scene of the crime the trace of a foreign presence that has intruded into a previously unviolated space” (Rosalind Krauss in: Rosalind Krauss, et al., Art since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism: 1945 to the Present, New York 2004, p. 372). Twombly’’s movements are emphatic and deliberate, traits made even more obvious by the soft wash of the translucent grey background, which, by contrast, seems almost entirely devoid of human interference. In the late 1960s, Twombly was exploring a fascination with Leonardo da Vinci’’s theories on the depiction of floods; a preoccupation that undoubtedly informed the sense of a seascape that suffuses this work. Born out of the broad pale strokes of the grey ground, and accentuated in the regularity of the relentless black lines punctuated with the flashes of bright marine blue, the impression of the steady wash of ocean waves is unmistakable in this work. Indeed, these abstractions make a worthy comparison with an excerpt of Leonardo’’s advice from his treaty On a Deluge and its Depiction in Painting (c. 1515-17): “The crests of the waves of the sea tumble to their bases, falling with friction on the bubbles of their sides: and this friction grinds the water into minute particles… and at last it rises into the air and is converted into clouds” (Leonardo da Vinci, 'On a Deluge and Its Depiction in Painting' cited in: Jean-Paul Richter, Ed., The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci, Vol. I, London 1939, p. 606). It is entirely possible that Twombly had this very passage in his mind when creating these repeated lines; he often relied on classical and renaissance source material to inspire his work and imbue it with cultural authority. Just like the waves of Leonardo’’s deluge, the horizontal hatchings of Untitled appear both to rise and to fall with at once immutable force, and steady calmness. These undular associations lend a sense of infinite momentum to the work and show Twombly musing on the impact of man – in this case the gestural intervention of the artist – against the unstoppable passage of time. 1971 was a particularly poignant year for Twombly to muse on the passage of time. In the same year Nini Pirandello, the wife of Twombly’’s Roman gallerist and a dear friend, died unexpectedly and inspired the hauntingly elegiac and widely celebrated series, Nini’’ s Paintings. There can be no doubt that, in this context, human mortality in the face of the all-consuming passage of time would have been at the forefront of Twombly’’s mind in the execution of this work and is expressed equally in the short blips of cursive script and the elongated strokes that dominate the composition. Untitled is then a work charged with pathos and inspired by grandiose Renaissance source material, in which Twombly deploys his virtuosic abstract style to create a powerful expression of artistic gesture. Fig. 1 The present work on view at the 5th Cologne Art Fair, Josef - Haubrich Kunsthalle, 1971 Photo: © bpk | Angelika Platen © Cy Twombly Foundation
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