Masami Teraoka

Japan (1936 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Masami Teraoka
TERAOKA Masami New Views Of Mt. Fuji / Sinking Pleasure Boat

Wright /Feb 27, 2014
29,082.45 - 43,623.67
32,782.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
72

Some works of Masami Teraoka

Extracted between 72 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Masami Teraoka - Tale Of A Thousand Condoms / Samurai And Razor

Masami Teraoka - Tale Of A Thousand Condoms / Samurai And Razor

Original 1989
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Lot number: 24
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Masami Teraoka (born 1936) Tale of a Thousand Condoms / Samurai and Razor , 1989 signed twice and inscribed 'Masami / Yamaka' (upper left) watercolor and sumi ink on unstretched canvas 83 3/4 x 130 3/4in. (212.7 x 332.1cm) Footnotes Provenance Catharine Clark Gallery, San Francisco, California. Private Collection, USA. Exhibited New York, Pamela Auchincloss Gallery, Masami Teraoka , 7 September-13 October 1990. Washington, D.C., Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Paintings by Masami Teraoka , 30 June 1996–1 January 1997, no. 27, illustrated in color p. 89 of exhibition catalogue. (This exhibition also traveled to San Francisco, at the Asian Art Museum.) Literature A. Bing, C. Clark, E. Heartney and K. Hoffmann, Ascending Chaos: The Art of Masami Teraoka 1966-2006 , San Francisco, 2006, illustrated in color p. 124.
Masami Teraoka - Views Of Mt. Fuji

Masami Teraoka - Views Of Mt. Fuji

Original 1977
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Lot number: 2026
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Masami Teraoka (born 1936) Four large prints Four serigraphs on Rives BFK paper, framed and glazed; each pencil signed and dated 1977 on the verso, entitled New Views of Mt. Fuji: Sinking Pleasure Boat , # 10/75, blind-stamped and dated upper right; New Views of Mt. Fuji: 31 Flavors Invading Japan: Chocolate Chip , #10/75; New Views of Mt. Fuji: 31 Flavors Invading Japan: French Vanilla , #10/75, blind-stamped and dated top center; New Views of Mt. Fuji: Waterfall Contemplation , #10/75, blind-stamped and dated upper right - each with three pieces of fabric tape to the reverse top, two with very slight toning along corner edges, otherwise excellent-very good conditions 55 x 11in (139.8 x 28cm) [print] 56 1/4x 12 1/2in (143.1 x 31.6cm) [overall] Provenance: reputed to have been printed by Ron McPherson and Julie McPherson and published by Space Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
Masami Teraoka - Today's Special

Masami Teraoka - Today's Special

Original
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Lot number: 3052
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Masami Teraoka (born 1936) Today's Special Color woodblock print with additional hand-coloring, framed with plexglass; from the series 31 Flavors Invading Japan , 1980-82, edition of 500, right margin with notation of carver, printer and publisher, reverse pencil signed - very good condition, top corners tacked to backing, otherwise very good condition 11in x 16 1/2in (28 x 42cm) [sheet] 15 1/2 x 21in (39.1 x 53.1cm) [frame]
Masami Teraoka - New Views Of Mt. Fuji / Sinking Pleasure Boat

Masami Teraoka - New Views Of Mt. Fuji / Sinking Pleasure Boat

Original
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Lot number: 188
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Masami Teraoka b. 1936 New Views of Mt. Fuji / Sinking Pleasure Boat 1976-1977 watercolor on paper 11 h x 55 w inches Private collection Exhibited: Masami Teraoka , 11 July - 24 August 1980, Honolulu Academy of Arts Masami Teraoka , 27 September - 30 November 1980, Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach
Masami Teraoka - New Views Of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat

Masami Teraoka - New Views Of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat

Original 1977
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Lot number: 45
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MASAMI TERAOKA (American/Japanese, B. 1936) New Views of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat watercolour on paper 27.9 x 139.7 cm. (11 x 55 in.) Painted in 1976-1977 Private Collection, USA California, USA, Newport Harbor Art Museum (now Orange County Museum of Art), Masami Teraoka, 27 September-30 November 1980. Hawaii, USA, Honolulu Academy of Arts, Masami Teraoka, 11 July-24 August 1980. Masami Teraoka was born in Japan in 1936 into a family that owned a kimono shop, which influenced his aesthetic appreciation for traditional Japanese prints at an early age. He moved to the United States in 1961 to pursue further education at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles and graduated in 1968. Influenced by the America Pop Art during his education, Teraoka found himself attracted to the movement's mass-culture-derived cliches, and began to question the fast consumerist cultural effects and influences on the rapid changes of Japan. In the early 1970s he began combining elements of traditional Japanese woodblock prints, ukiyo-e, with pop art, by using watercolour on paper to appropriate the ukiyo-e style with images of popular consumer goods into the traditional Japanese aesthetic. By the late 1970's the ukiyo-e style with images of popular consumer goods into the traditional Japanese aesthetic. By the late 1970s the ukiyo-e graphic became his signature style, a visual platform to critique the cultural clashes of the East and West, commentating on the many sociopolitical issues in the late 20th Century, and such cultural commentary has become the constant subject in his work. New Views of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat (Lot 45) painted between 1976 and 1977, depicts the traditional Japanese ukiyo aesthetic: a flat graphic style delineated by calligraphic brushstrokes and layers of delicate detailed patterned colours, with subject matters of rural Japan or teahouse, of mythical tales, or portrait of the actors and geisha, courtesans, and Samurais with female beauties. ukiyo began in the 17th Century Japan during the beginning of the Edo period of intense censorship and didactic tinkering by the government, and a period where Chinese philosophy of Confucianism is deeply rooted in everyday life, where being modest, prudent and extreme self-disciplined is highly valued in society. Ukiyo, meaning the floating world, the ever-changing world had become a powerful and pervasive perception of the world, a world of frivolous, narcissistic, stylish, and ephemeral pleasure seeking. As for ukiyo-e, meaning the pictures of the floating world, this colour woodblock print became the visualizing tool to portray this world of pleasure seeking, with subject matters associating with sensuality and theatricality that allow its audience to escape from the oppressed society. Also because the prints can be mass produced, this has become a popular painting substitute amongst the people with different ranking in society at that time, with mainly its audience focused by men. In New Views of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat the roaring wave depicted like the craws of lion charges forward to demolish the chaotic foreground boat that is half sunk about to be flipped over with its passengers. The passengers on the boat are no ordinary modern day tourists, subversively, it is the Edo period kabuki (dance-drama) actors, samurai, farmer, geiko (geisha) and courtesan, each dressed in their accustomed attires, posed as if they were on the stage, each have their own act to perform yet, disregarding the disaster ahead of them. In the far left, the drunken farmer reclines backwards still holding onto his fan as he passes out to a deep dream, then another farmer leaning forwards trying to pour sake for that one last drink before the boat sinks. In the middle, an actor dressed in kabuki attire shields his face with a half-open fan, leaping one foot upwards appearing frightened as the surging wave floods through his feet. In lower middle, the geiko with her shamisen (three-stringed instrument) at her lap, instead of playing the instrument, she covers her mouth with a cloth, nonchalant at the astounded scene ahead of her. In upper middle, a man stands on a wooden bucket in an obscene composure with his abacus, meanwhile the geiko below him tittering with her mouth covered by her hand, and with another hand holding onto the camera shutter string, appearing to clandestinely capture the man's ludicrous behaviour. In the lower right, a samurai appears to be in an act of fornication with a courtesan yet, with his right hand reaching out to grasp on his golf club as it sinks into the sea. The pleasure boat is filled with all sorts of entertainment amenity from the past to present, the shamisen , samurai swords, fans, sake, and beautiful array of sushi, miso soup bowl, bento box, wooden bucket, abacus, camera, tripod and golf club. However, a few things are missing to make it a sailable boat. It seems obscene to have a boat to go out into the open sea without any reliable equipment, this heightened the cynical narration of this painting, Teraoka suggests a mockery at the Japanese consumerist culture and the tourism industry, commenting on the rise of the savvy automated camera available to the masses, and the booming tourism industry during the flourish of the Japanese in the 1970s. The graphic source of Teraoka stems from the great masters of Ukiyo-e print produced in the 18th and 19th Century Japan during the Meiji period, a time characterised by new influences as Japan opened up to the West. Notable ukiyo-e artists were Kitagawa Utamaro best known for his portraiture of beautiful women, Katsushika Hokusai famous for his The Great Wave of Kanagawa, Toshusai Sharaku best known for his portraiture of kabuki actor, Utagawa Hiroshige best known for his landscape, and Utagawa the most prolific and most popular artist during Meiji period. Out of these masters of ukiyo-e, Kunisada is the one that influenced Teraoka the most on aesthetic execution and methods of narration. Much of Teraoka's paintings carry that peculiar decadent aesthetic in Kunisada's prints, and we see the explicit sensual and theatrical sexualised imagery, the detailed and complex composition of Teraoka's subject matter that fills the painting, as well as the cursive scripture of Kunisada's style that often appears along his portraitures. The facial features of male and female in this painting resonate Utagawa Kunisada's androgynous portraiture of his female heroine (Fig. 1). There is also a peculiar mirror graphic element of Kunisada's works (Fig. 2) that we can find in New Views of Mt. Fuji Sinking Pleasure Boat, on the upper left corner, the mirror in Teraoka's painting represents the thoughts reflected in a mirror. Paradoxically, amidst the chaos in the sea, the mirror image reflected here is a goose on dry land, a rather surreal combination comparing to the rest of the painting. This image of representation or self-reflection suggests the desire of the passengers to land on dry land, or more explicitly, it could suggest the artist's concerns on the disruption of wildlife inhabitants caused by the pollution from the rise of the tourism industry in Japan. Moreover, the roaring wave depicted like the claws of lions charging forward to demolish the foreground boat, echoes the famous Katsushika Hokusai's The Great Wave of Kanagawa (Fig. 3). Teraoka's waves illustrated like a mounting wave that is as high as the painting's height. In a panoramic view it could easily be mistaken for a range of snowy mountains from afar. This panoramic view resonates the horizontal scroll or multiple screen panels in Japanese traditional painting. There are also many ukiyo-e prints produced in diptychs or triptychs that frame the work in different parts to direct the viewer's gaze from one panel to the other. In this painting Teraoka's panorama scroll-like vision directs the viewer's gaze from left to right. Therefore the composition here is visually composed in a linear manner with the surging wave and the figures to direct the viewer's gaze from left to right. Moreover, this vibrant illustration of the surging wave expresses the force of nature that mankind cannot defy, that anything could be washed away in a flick of time, whatever that's been washed away could become a potential pollution to sabotage the oceanic life. In Japan, ocean and water have very important symbolic meaning, despite the destructive forces of nature the ocean could also create life and bring balance to life. As such, the ocean is sacred to Japanese culture and it is an important source to provide sustenance to their daily lives. By appropriating the ukiyo-e style with images of popular consumer goods such as the camera and golf club into traditional Japanese aesthetic, Teraoka plays on the pop-psychological parody of post-war consumerist culture in Japan, the critique on the nouveaux riches Japanese tourists and on how certain consumer goods could also become a national symbol for Japanese tourists, such as the stereotypical accessories of cameras and golf clubs. Such parody and critique resonate to Richard Hamilton's Just What It Is That Makes Today's Homes So Different, So Appealing? (Fig. 4), a piece that raises viewer's awareness on the fast consumerist culture's effect and influence on the rapidly changing contemporary society. Teraoka's Pop ukiyo-e style is not only visually mesmerising through its frank and flamboyant sexual expression that cleverly encodes social and political commentary, but also is fundamentally in defiance against cultural orthodoxy, social conformity, and political oppression.
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