George Stubbs

United Kingdom (17241806 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - George Stubbs
STUBBS George Labourers & Game Keepers

Bonhams /Sep 19, 2012
1,264.06 - 1,896.09
1,619.54

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Artworks in Arcadja
173

Some works of George Stubbs

Extracted between 173 works in the catalog of Arcadja
George Stubbs - Tygers At Play

George Stubbs - Tygers At Play

Original 1776
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Gross Price
Lot number: 22
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Description:
Presumably commissioned or purchased by George Brodrick, 4th Viscount Midleton (1754–1836); Thence by descent to his son George Alan Brodrick, 5th Viscount Midleton (1806–1848); By inheritance to his cousin, Charles Brodrick, 6th Viscount Midleton (1791–1863); By inheritance to his brother, William John Brodrick, 7th Viscount Midleton (1798–1870), Dean of Exeter and Chaplain to Queen Victoria; By descent to his son, William Brodrick, 8th Viscount Midleton (1830–1907); By descent to his son, William St John Fremantle Brodrick, 9th Viscount Midleton and 1st Earl of Midleton (1856–1942); By descent to his son, George Brodrick, 2nd Earl of Midleton (1888–1979); With Oscar & Peter Johnson, London, from whom acquired by the present owners in 1962. Probably London, Royal Academy, 1776, no. 293 (as Tygers at Play); London, Oscar & Peter Johnson Gallery, Pictures and Drawings from Yorkshire Houses, 1963, no. 15; London, Tate Gallery, George Stubbs 1724–1806, 17 October 1984 – 6 January 1985, no. 78; New Haven, Yale Centre for British Art, George Stubbs 1724–1806, 13 February – 7 April 1985, no. 78; Leeds, City Art Gallery, Whistlejacket & Scrub: Large as Life; The Great Horse Paintings of Stubbs, 12 September – 9 November 2008, unnumbered. PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION George Stubbs, A.R.A. LIVERPOOL 1724 - 1806 LONDON 'TYGERS AT PLAY' oil on canvas 101.5 by 127 cm.; 40 by 50 in. The following condition report is provided by Sarah Walden, who is an external specialist and not an employee of Sotheby's. This painting has a comparatively recent lining and stretcher, perhaps from the early middle of the twentieth century. The fine even texture of the surface is perfectly secure and undisturbed by any past damage. The exceptionally pure, intact quality of the painting throughout suggests that it had a calm, stable early history with scarcely any intervention perhaps until the cleaning and restoration presumably with the lining mentioned above. The subtle transitions in the landscape, paling as it recedes into the distance, are beautifully preserved, increasing the contrast with the strength of tone of the cubs themselves, which remain in extraordinarily perfect condition down to the slightest whisker. Under ultra violet light a single, quite small, recent retouching of any consequence can be seen in the shadow on the ground just to the left of the cubs. Elsewhere there is only a little surface scratch in the mid left background and a tiny surface touch or two at upper left. Along the base edge there may be old retouching in a few places. The old varnish has been thinned, with some uneven earlier varnish also visible in places under ultra violet. The fine brushwork remains exceptionally well preserved however almost throughout, even in the delicate darker detail of the foreground and the palm tree, as well as in the fragile tracery of the mountains against the sky. Just in the upper right corner of the sky the light ground can be seen emerging unevenly through a slightly thinner film of blue paint. It is rare to find a painting so beautifully preserved. "This lot is offered for sale subject to Sotheby's Conditions of Business, which are available on request and printed in Sotheby's sale catalogues. The independent reports contained in this document are provided for prospective bidders' information only and without warranty by Sotheby's or the Seller."
George Stubbs - King Charles Spaniel

George Stubbs - King Charles Spaniel

Original 1776
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Lot number: 450
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Description:
Provenance Anonymous sale, Cirencester, Moore Allen & Innocent, 1973, to Kenneth Mackinnon Guichard; By whom sold ('Various Properties'), London, Christie's, 23 November 1973, lot 56, to Speelman for 90,000 gns.; Acquired from Edward Speelman Ltd., London, 4 August 1978. Exhibited Possibly London, Royal Academy, 1776, no. 295; London, Tate Gallery, George Stubbs, 1984-1985, no. 100; Munich, Neue Pinakothek, George Stubbs (1724–1806). Science into Art – Tiermalerei zwischen Wissenschaft und Kunst, 26 January – 6 May 2012, no. 48. 450 George Stubbs, A.R.A. LIVERPOOL 1724 - 1806 LONDON KING CHARLES SPANIEL signed and dated lower right: Geo: Stubbs / pinxit 1776 oil on panel 59 by 71 cm.; 23 ¼ by 28 in. Estimate 1,200,000 - 1,800,000 GBP Print The following condition report is provided by Sarah Walden who is an external specialist and not an employee of Sotheby's: This painting is on a quite thick panel, in one piece, possibly of mahogany. There are narrow border strips attached all round. Near the right base corner there may have once been some slight past movement. Essentially however the panel seems to have remained flat, although with a faint hint of minutely raised flakes across the surface. Maintaining constant relative humidity will therefore always be important. The restoration is quite recent. Under ultra violet light tiny retouchings can be seen sprinkled over the dark background, with rather more widespread patches of retouching at the middle on the left in the background and above the spaniel's head. There are larger individual retouchings across the foreground. The lower right corner seems to have a patch of older retouching possibly connected to the slight change in the wood behind mentioned above. The spaniel has survived with rather less incidental damage, although the chestnut curls have been more vulnerable to wear than the white, with strengthening in the brown shadows around the ears and isolated slightly larger retouchings within the brown hair of the middle of the body, and scattered across the lower centre of the painting. Despite the fragility of the surface at some point in the past the vibrancy of the image and the beauty of the details remain well preserved. This report was not done under laboratory conditions
George Stubbs - James Hamilton, 2nd Earl Of Clanbrassil (1730-1798), With His Bay Hunter Mowbray, Resting On A Wooded Path By A Lake

George Stubbs - James Hamilton, 2nd Earl Of Clanbrassil (1730-1798), With His Bay Hunter Mowbray, Resting On A Wooded Path By A Lake

Original 1765
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Gross Price
Lot number: 46
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Description:
George Stubbs, A.R.A. (Liverpool 1724-1806 London) James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Clanbrassil (1730-1798), with his bay hunter Mowbray, resting on a wooded path by a lake signed and dated 'Geo Stubbs / pinxit / 1765' (lower right); further signed and dated 'Geo Stubbs / 1769' (over the former signature and date, lower right); and with later inscriptions 'Mowbray a Hunter belonging / to James Earl of Clanbrassil (lower left) and 'J AMES 2 ND EARL of CLANBRASSILL, OBT1798.' (lower centre) oil on canvas 40 x 50½ in. (101.6 x 128.3 cm.) in a gilded hollow section frame of circa 1800, with composition lamb's tongue sight edge Commissioned by James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Clanbrassil (1730-1798), who died without issue, and by inheritance to the children of his sister Anne, wife of Robert, 1st Earl of Roden, and by descent in the family to the present owner. THE PROPERTY OF A NOBLEMAN H. Walpole, ed. H. Gatty, 'Notes by Horace Walpole, fourth Earl of Orford, on the Exhibitions of the Society of Artists and the Free Society of Artists, 1760-1791', Walpole Society, XXVII, 1938-9, p. 79. E.G.S. Reilly, Historical Anecdotes of the Families of the Boleynes, Careys, Mordaunts, Hamiltons and Jocelyns, arranged as an elucidation of the Genealogical Chart at Tollymore Park, 1839, p. 95. Catalogue of the Paintings at Tullymore Park, 1880, pp. 10-11 (hanging in the long corridor). The Earl of Roden, Tollymore: The Story of an Irish Demesne, Belfast, 2005, p. 49, illustrated. J. Egerton, George Stubbs, Painter: Catalogue Raisonné, New Haven and London, 2007, pp. 244-5, no. 79, illustrated. London, Society of Artists, 1765, no. 128, as 'Portrait of a Hunter'. Belfast, Ulster Museum, on loan, circa 1970-2000. Fort Worth, Kimbell Art Museum; Baltimore, The Walters Art Gallery; London, National Gallery, Stubbs and the Horse, 14 November 2004-25 September 2005, no. 44. Newmarket, The British Sporting Art Trust Galleries at the National Horseracing Museum, on loan until 2013. This masterpiece from Stubbs' early maturity demonstrates his supreme skill at rendering the equine form, combined with his gifts as a portraitist and his dexterity as a landscape painter. Exhibited in 1765, during the decade described by Basil Taylor as 'in scope and productiveness the most fecund period of the artist's life' (Stubbs, London, 1971, p. 13), this picture dates to the same year as Stubbs' celebrated painting of Gimcrack on Newmarket Heath, sold at Christie's, London in July 2011. One of the artist's earliest commissions from an Irish patron, the picture is beautifully preserved having passed by inheritance in the sitter's family to the present owner. Stubbs' patronage from the great Whig aristocrats -most notably the Duke of Richmond, the Marquess of Rockingham, Earl Grosvenor and Viscount Bolingbroke - during this decisive early period of the artist's career is well-known. However, Clanbrassil would appear to have been one of the very first Irish patrons to recognise the painter's talents and to commission a horse portrait from him. Stubbs may have been recommended to Clanbrassil by William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, who was a cousin through his mother, Henrietta, daughter of William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland. His mother's younger sister, Barbara Bentinck, was married to Sir Francis Godolphin, 2nd Bt., who later married as his second wife, Anne FitzWilliam, a relation by marriage of Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham. Rockingham was arguably Stubbs' greatest patron, commissioning no fewer than twelve pictures from the artist during the 1760s, most significantly his majestic Whistlejacket (London, National Gallery; Egerton no. 34). Clanbrassil's brother-in-law, Robert, 2nd Viscount Jocelyn and later 1st Earl of Roden, was the first Irish patron to commission a portrait of a racehorse, Havannah, from Stubbs in 1765 (location unknown; Egerton no. 59); while Clanbrassil's cousin, William Henry Fortescue, 1st Earl Clermont, M.P. for Dundalk, commissioned portraits of a favourite pointer Phillis in 1772 and his bay thoroughbred Johnny in 1775. Other Irish patrons included George Brodrick, 3rd Viscount Midleton,who commissioned or purchased a Mares and Foals on a river bank from Stubbs in 1765 (London, Tate; Egerton no. 62); his son, George Brodrick, 4th Viscount Midleton, who commissioned or purchased Tygers at Play from the artist in circa 1770-5 (Private collection; Egerton no. 122); and Robert Maxwell, 2nd Bt. Farnham, Co. Cavan, who commissioned a portrait of a chestnut racehorse Conductor at Newmarket with jockey up (a horse owned jointly with Lord Clermont), in circa 1773 (UK, Private collection; Egerton no. 157). Clanbrassil is positioned centre-stage, holding the viewer in direct eye-contact, with his favourite bay hunter, Mowbray alert at his side, slightly on the turn, with his back left leg a little raised, in a subtly observed landscape. Stubbs' rendering of horse and rider, and the relationship between the two, is immeasurably more dynamic, perceptive and engaging than the comparatively static works of his predecessors such as John Wootton, which tend to show the horse in conventional flat profile. Stubbs' understanding of and ability to render the horse's anatomy, from its precise skeletal structure through layers of muscle and sinew to the silky coat, was also without parallel in sporting art. This extraordinary achievement was the outcome of an intense period of anatomical study through practical dissection between 1756 and 1758, resulting in his ground-breaking publication Anatomy of the Horse, which both revolutionised the genre and heralded Stubbs as a true exponent of the wide-ranging intellectual movement of the Enlightenment. Stubbs has masterfully captured the physiognomy of James, 2nd Earl of Clanbrassil. Described as 'notoriously stubborn' and 'sometimes given to melancholy', Clanbrassil's character was more generously summed up by the literary hostess Mary Delany, who remarked that he: 'looks old for his age (having lost all his fore teeth), but he is tall, genteel and very well bred, free from every vice in the world' (Life, 2nd series, II, 1862, p. 580). The only other recorded portraits of the sitter are pastels by Jean-Etienne Liotard, executed during the artist's second visit to London between 1773 and 1774 (see for example Fig. 1). When this painting was exhibited at the Society of Artists in 1765, Horace Walpole entered the words 'bad. Lord Clanbrassil' against the title in his copy of the exhibition catalogue. This brusque comment is more likely to be an indication of his bias against the sitter, rather than any reflection of his view of the picture's artistic merits, since Clanbrassil's father, the 1st Earl of Clanbrassil, had sat in judgement on Walpole's own father after he ceased to be Prime Minister, as chairman of the Committee set up to investigate allegations of corruption in 1742. The sitter was elected as the second representative member of the Irish House of Parliament for the seat of Midleton in County Cork in 1755, was appointed Sheriff of County Louth in 1757 and inherited his title on his father's death the following year, at the age of twenty-seven. Between 1757 and 1798, he held the office of Chief Remembrancer of the Court of Exchequer (Ireland) and was promoted a Privy Councillor in Ireland in 1766. His Irish title did not preclude him from sitting in the English House of Commons and he was elected a Member of Parliament for Helston in Cornwall, representing the constituency from 1769 to 1774. In 1783, he was appointed one of the founder Knights of St. Patrick, a chivalric order instituted by George III to mirror the Garter in England and the Thistle in Scotland. Clanbrassil was a member of the Society of Dilettanti and a founder member of the Royal Irish Academy in 1785. While his father had played a significant role in the redevelopment of Dundalk in the early 18th century, the 2nd Earl turned his attentions to the improvement of the family estate at Tollymore. An advocate of the new fashion for 'Gothick', Clanbrassil completed the house in 1777 with numerous bridges and gatehouses, and built a barn with an ecclesiastical-like tower, which remains one of the most idiosyncratic practical farming buildings in Ireland. His activities in forestry gained him recognition from the Dublin Society, which presented him with gold medals for his tree-planting both in County Louth and at Tollymore. Clanbrassil married Grace Foley, daughter of Sir Thomas Foley, 1st Bt. of Kidderminster, in 1774. When Clanbrassil died without issue in 1798, the title became extinct and the estates were inherited by his sister, Anne, wife of Robert Jocelyn, 1st Earl of Roden. An auction sale of the contents of his London mansion held in 1813 lasted four days. At once a penetrating portrait, sporting subject and landscape study, this picture ultimately transcends all three genres to constitute a new and distinct form of aristocratic en plein air portraiture. As Basil Taylor explained in his seminal work on the artist: 'In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the portrait had uniquely served the interests of family, rank and ambition. [Now] a different form of art with a wider range of subject could confer a similar honour upon the whole scope of material property' (op. cit., p. 12). Stubbs achieved a similar synthesis in two later works, in which the key protagonist also takes centre-stage: Captain Samuel Sharpe with his wife, Pleasance, of 1769 (Washington, National Gallery of Art; Egerton, no. 98), and Sir Peniston and Lady Lamb, later Lord and Lady Melbourne, of 1769-70 (London, The National Gallery; Egerton, no. 130).
George Stubbs - Labourers & Game Keepers

George Stubbs - Labourers & Game Keepers

Original
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Net Price
Lot number: 9
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
George Stubbs, ARA (Liverpool 1724-1806 London) Labourers & Game Keepers (Lennox-Boyd 87, 88) Mezzotints, the pair, on laid, with wide margins, extensively hand coloured, published January 2nd and March 25th, 1790 respectively by Benjamin Beale Evans, engraved by Henry Birche, 440 x 650mm (17 1/4 x 25 1/2in)(PL) (2) (unframed)
George Stubbs - A Lion Devouring A Horse

George Stubbs - A Lion Devouring A Horse

Original 1788
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Gross Price
Lot number: 202
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
GEORGE STUBBS A Lion Devouring a Horse. Soft-ground etching and engraving printed in dark brownish black on cream laid paper, before 1788. 250x335 mm; 9 3/4x13 1/4 inches, with narrow margins outside the image. An extremely scarce, unrecorded working proof in soft-ground etching and engraving only. We have found only 4 other impressions from the published state at auction in the past 25 years; this is the first proof before the roulette additions to be offered at auction in the past 25 years. Lennox-Boyd 71. Estimate $40,000-60,000
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