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John Roddam Spencer Stanhope

United Kingdom (1829 -  1908 ) Wikipedia® : John Roddam Spencer Stanhope
STANHOPE John Roddam Spencer Flora (the Birth Of Venus)

Sotheby's /Nov 19, 2013
119,724.67 - 179,587.00
146,093.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
33

Some works of John Roddam Spencer Stanhope

Extracted between 33 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - The Temptation Of Eve

John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - The Temptation Of Eve

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Lot number: 33
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Description:
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908) The Temptation of Eve pencil and watercolour with gum arabic, heightened with bodycolour and gold, on paper wrapped around a wooden stretcher 23 x 11 in. (58.4 x 28 cm.) Unlike the majority of the other artists in the Pre-Raphaelite circle, Stanhope came from an aristocratic background and as a man of private means did not have to paint for his living. He was certainly independent from the vagaries of the market place. As John Christian wrote 'what strikes us most is his unique contribution to the Aesthetic and Symbolist movements which evolved out of the Pre-Raphaelitism's second, Rossettian phase'. He initially trained under G. F. Watts and accompanied him to Italy in 1853. This visit had a profound effect on Stanhope, who apparently decided that \\\‘all the great painters lived before Raphael\\\’s time\\\’ (A.M.W. Stirling, A painter of dreams and other biographical studies, 1916, p. 325). Watts was not a charismatic teacher and Stanhope soon felt the sway of Rossetti and Burne-Jones. In 1857, he was invited by Rossetti to work on the Oxford Union murals alongside both Rossetti and Burne-Jones, both of whom deeply influenced his early style. In 1860, Stanhope married and initially settled in Surrey, in a house designed for him by Philip Webb, who had previously built the Red House for William Morris. However, his chronic ill health (he suffered from severe asthma), meant that he moved several times and began to spend his winters in Italy. In 1873, he bought Villa Nuti, just outside Florence and from 1880, he settled there permanently, remaining there until his death twenty-eight years later. Burne-Jones lamented the implications of this self-imposed exile: 'His absence from London', he told his assistant T.M. Rooke in 1896, 'has removed him...from his contemporaries and their criticism, and he's got to think more and more exclusively of old pictures to the extent that he'll almost found his own pictures on them and give up his own individuality' (Mary Lago (ed.), Burne-Jones Talking, London, 1981, p. 78). Yet Stanhope remains a fascinating phenomenon, a second-generation Pre-Raphaelite whose long residence in Florence and day-to-day exposure to the old masters profoundly influenced his later style and helped to give it its characteristic flavour. Although Stanhope exhibited fourteen pictures at the Royal Academy, he never felt entirely comfortable there. He preferred less conventional venues such as the Dudley Gallery, which opened at the Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly in 1865 and he was invited to contribute to Sir Coutts Lindsay's Grosvenor Gallery in Bond Street from 1877, where he continued to exhibit until 1888. He then transferred to the New Gallery in Regent Street, exhibiting there until 1900. There is a tempera on panel painting of the same subject in Manchester Art Gallery. In the Manchester version, Eve has long blonde hair and stands on a dense carpet of flowers, the serpent\\\’s hair is dark and its coils blue and in the background there are glimpses of an Italianate architectural scene.
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - A Design For The Reredos At Holy Trinity Church, Florence

John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - A Design For The Reredos At Holy Trinity Church, Florence

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Lot number: 26
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John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908) A design for the reredos at Holy Trinity Church, Florence, including: The Crucifixion; The Annunciation; four Old Testament Prophets; and eight Angels inscribed 'Design for the Reredos/at Holy Trinity-Florence/by/R. Spencer Stanhope' (on a label attached to the backboard) and further inscribed 'angels....to be red one' (on the reverse of the backboard) pencil, pen and brown ink and watercolour heightened with touches of white and gold, on paper, fourteen watercolours in an elaborate gilt-mahogany Gothic Revival frame by Bertini of Florence 20 ½ x 10 in. (52 x 25.4 cm.); and smaller; the frame 54 ½ x 33 7/8 in. (138.5 x 85.9 cm.) overall 14 in one frame
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Flora

John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Flora

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Lot number: 62
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John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908)

Flora

pencil and watercolour with bodycolour, on paper

22½ x 9¾ in. (57 x 24.5 cm.)
I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms.
Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 2 July 1904, lot 48, as 'The Birth of Eve' (24 gns to Gooden & Fox).
The picture is a watercolour version of a larger oil sold in these Rooms on 7 June 1996, lot 576. The composition shows Stanhope's style at its most Italianate, owing an obvious debt to Botticelli's Birth of Venus in the Uffizi, a work that, as a resident of Bellosguardo, he would have known well. Particularly reminiscent of the famous prototype is the way Flora's auburn locks cascade over her shoulders, loosely restrained by ropes of pearls. The connection is underlined by a painting of The Birth of Venus by Stanhope himself, probably the one he showed at the Grosvenor Gallery in 1885, in which the pose of the figure adopted for Flora is repeated (illustrated in Percy Bate, The English Pre-Raphaelite Painters, 4th ed., London, 1910, between pp. 108 and 109).
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Flora (the Birth Of Venus)

John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Flora (the Birth Of Venus)

Original 1885
Estimate:

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Lot number: 9
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Description:
Provenance

Joseph Dixon of 1 St John's Gardens, Ladbroke Grove, London;

Sold by Dixon's executors, Christie's, 18 March 1911, lot 36, as The Birth of Venus (bought 36gns 'Thorne');

Mrs Charlotte Frank, London;

Sebastian de Ferranti, by whom sold Christie's, 7 June 1996, lot 576

Exhibited

Probably, London, Grosvenor Gallery, 1885, no.130 as The Birth of Venus;

Nottingham, Djangoly Art Gallery, University of Nottingham, Heaven on Earth, 1994, no.62 as Flora

9

John Roddam Spencer-Stanhope

1829-1908

FLORA (THE BIRTH OF VENUS)

oil on panel

128.5 by 52.5cm., 50¾ by 20¾in.

GBP

Print

STRUCTURE The picture is in good condition and ready to hang. It has been cradled at the reverse. UNDER ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT There are areas of retouching to small vertical cracks in the top of the picture and a larger crack between the figure's feet. There is also another smaller repaired crack to the left of her feet. FRAME This picture is contained in a carved gilt frame (probably the original). The frame requires restoration.
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Tecrucifixion

John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Tecrucifixion

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Lot number: 38
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Description:
John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908)
A Design for the Reredos at Holy Trinity, Florence including: TheCrucifixion; The Annunciation; four Old Testament Prophets; andeight Angels
inscribed 'Design for the Reredos/at Holy Trinity-Florence/by/R.Spencer Stanhope' (on a label attached to the backboard) andfurther inscribed 'angels..?..to be red one' (on the reverse of thebackboard)
pencil, pen and brown ink and watercolour heightened with touchesof white and gold, on paper, fourteen watercolours in an elaborategilt-mahogany Gothic Revival frame by Bertini of Florence
20½ x 10 in. (52 x 25.4 cm.); and smaller; the frame 54½ x 33 7/8in. (138.5 x 85.9 cm.) overall
14 in one frame
To be offered on behalf of Esher Parochial Church Council
Bequeathed by the artist to his stepdaughter, Mrs Mure. Given by her in 1936 to Christ Church, Esher, Surrey, where it wasdisplayed in the Lady Chapel.
Peter Trippi, John Roddam Spencer Stanhope: The Early Years of aSecond Generation Pre-Raphaelite 1858-1873, MA thesis, CourtauldInstitute, University of London, 1993, p. 101. Judy Oberhausen and Nic Peeters, 'Rediscovering a Pre-RaphaeliteMasterpiece: A Spencer Stanhope altarpiece', The British ArtJournal, Vol. VIII, no. 1, 2007, pp. 68-72, illustrated pls. 3, 4,6, 7, 10, 11.
London, Carfax Gallery, Pictures and drawings by the late R.Spencer Stanhope, 1909, no. 17. Recently on loan to the Treasury at Guildford Cathedral.
This is an elaborate study for a polyptych that Stanhope paintedfor Holy Trinity Church, in Via Micheli, Florence, in the 1890s. Sohighly finished is it, including having an ornate Gothic Revivalframe similar to the one on the ultimate work, that it is virtuallyan altarpiece in itself. Indeed it was used as such when it waspresented by the artist's stepdaughter to Christ Church, Esher,Surrey, in 1936. Of aristocratic lineage (his mother was the youngest daughter ofThomas Coke, Earl of Leicester, the greatest agricultural reformerof his time), Stanhope suffered from chronic ill health, and thisdetermined where he spent his adult life. After several moves insearch of the right climate, he bought the Villa Nuti, atBellosguardo outside Florence in 1873, settling there in 1880 andremaining until his death twenty-eight years later. Burne-Jones,who had known him since they had worked side by side on theill-fated Oxford Union murals in 1857-8, and who himself profoundlyinfluenced his style, lamented the implications of thisself-imposed exile. 'It was a great pity that he ever sawBotticelli's (work)', he told his assistant T.M. Rooke in 1896.'His absence from London has removed him...from his contemporariesand their criticism, and he's got to think more and moreexclusively of old pictures to the extent that he'll almost foundhis own pictures on them and give up his individuality' (Mary Lago(ed.), Burne-Jones Talking, London, 1981, pp. 77-8). Yet Stanhoperemains a fascinating phenomenon, a second-generationPre-Raphaelite whose long residence in Florence and day-to-dayexposure to the old masters profoundly influenced his later styleand helped to give it its characteristic flavour. Stanhope's involvement in the construction and furnishing of HolyTrinity Church represents the climax of his long collaboration withGeorge Frederick Bodley (1827-1907), the church's architect. Theyhad worked together earlier on the church of StMartin's-on-the-Hill, Scarborough (1862), the Chapel at MarlboroughCollege (1875-86), the parish church at Cawthorne, Yorkshire(1875-80), and the English church, St Mark's, in Florence (1892-3).At Holy Trinity Stanhope's commitment included serving asvice-chairman of the building fund committee and selling one of hisown most prized possessions, a Madonna and Child attributed toBotticelli, to pay for the church's tower. But his greatest contribution was the execution of a series ofaltarpieces. The first, in which the Resurrection was representedin terms of four panels (Oberhausen and Peeters, pl. 1), dated from1892 and was destined for the Memorial Chapel. The second, whichfollowed four years later, comprised no fewer than fourteen panelsand stood on the high altar. A third, symbolising the ten plaguesof Egypt, was being planned at the time of Stanhope's death in1908. Alas, all three schemes were fated. The two completed altarpieceswere removed and dismantled when the church was taken over by theWaldensians, a Calvanist sect, some forty years ago. The fourpanels of the Memorial Chapel altarpiece have re-appeared but theframe is missing, while the high altar polyptych remains completelyuntraced. As for the projected 'plagues of Egypt' altarpiece, thewatercolour studies that were all Stanhope achieved before hisdeath were destroyed by fire in 1991. This makes the present painting, the highly-finished sketch for themain high altar work, all the more significant. The altarpieceitself was in tempera, a favourite medium with Stanhope, who helpedto found the Society of Painters in Tempera in 1901, whereas thesketch is in watercolour. Otherwise, as is clear from an oldphotograph of the finished work, the difference is only one ofscale. Like the altarpiece, the sketch is in an ornate GothicRevival gilt-mahogany frame, made by the Florentine firm of Bertiniwhich Stanhope often patronised. The iconography, too, is the same.The altarpiece is divided into five bays of varying height andwidth. In the central bay, the tallest and widest, are two subjectsof supreme Christian significance, the Annunciation below and theCrucifixion above. To either side of these compositions are foursmall panels of music-making angels, while beyond these again arefour figures of Old Testament prophets - Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Elijahand Isaiah, each holding a scroll inscribed with an appropriatetext. The Renaissance sources for the altarpiece are discussed at lengthby Oberhausen and Peeters in their article. Fra Angelico, Pierodella Francesca and Botticelli are all seen as influential, bearingout Burne-Jones's comment about Stanhope's dependence on these andother masters. But the altarpiece is certainly no pastiche. Verymuch of its period and milieu, it could only be by Stanhope, havingall the mannerisms and quirks of style that make him instantlyrecognisable. Above all, it shows his astonishing sense of colour.Glowing with rich reds, greens, blues and refulgent gold, itvividly illustrates another of Burne-Jones's comments to Rooke,that Stanhope's colour was 'beyond any the finest inEurope'.
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