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Sotheby's

Sotheby's logo


Sotheby’s was founded in London on March 11, 1744, when Samuel Baker auctioned “several Hundred scarce and valuable books” from the library of the Rt Hon Sir John Stanley for a few hundred pounds. The story of Sotheby’s expansion beyond books to include the best in fine and decorative arts and jewellery is also the story of the global auction market, defined by extraordinary moments that continue to capture the world’s attention.
Since 1744, Sotheby’s has distinguished itself as a leader in the auction world. Our auctions, conducted in the venerable salerooms in London and Paris, the museum-quality galleries of our headquarters in New York and the spirited environs of Hong Kong rivet audiences worldwide. Season after season, the depth and excellence of Sotheby’s offerings have produced watershed, record-breaking sales. Sotheby’s has been entrusted with the sale of many of the world's treasures, amongst them: Napoleon’s St Helena library, the Duchess of Windsor’s jewels, the Estate of Mrs Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Rembrandt’s Aristotle Contemplating the Bust of Homer, Rubens’ Massacre of the Innocents, Picasso’s Garçon à la Pipe, Bacon’s Triptych, 1976, The Grand Ducal Collections of Baden, the Qianlong Yellow-Ground Famille-Rose Double-Gourd Vase, the 5,000-year-old Guennol Lioness, Giacometti’s L’Homme Qui Marche I, the Magna Carta, the first printing of the Declaration of Independence and The Martin Luther King Jr Collection.
Sotheby’s has long recognised that great works of art, as well as the collectors interested in consigning and acquiring them, inhabit the global sphere. We were the first international auction house to expand from London to New York in 1955, and the first to conduct sales in Hong Kong and the then–Soviet Union. Today we maintain 90 locations in 40 countries and we conduct 250 auctions each year in over 70 categories. In addition to our four principal salerooms, the company, recognising the potential in new markets, also conducts auctions in six other salerooms around the world, further expanding our global reach. Through BIDnow, clients can also watch all Sotheby’s auctions live online and place bids in real time, from anywhere in the world. And through the ever-enriching content on Sothebys.com, the oldest publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange (BID) continues to be fresh and current, while always mindful of its historic roots.
An unwavering commitment to the very highest level of quality remains the goal of one of the most storied names on the global business stage.
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Some works sold by Sotheby's

Cheyney Thompson - Chronochrome Xiii

Cheyney Thompson - Chronochrome Xiii

Original 2009
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 1
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Cheyney Thompson B. 1975 CHRONOCHROME XIII signed, dated 2009 and numbered 13 on the overlap oil on canvas 139.6 by 162.6cm.; 55 by 64in. Provenance Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Cologne Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2009 Exhibited Berlin, Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Pedestals, Bias-cut, /Robert Macaire/, Chronochromes, 2009 Catalogue Note “In an uncanny parallel to photography’’’’s 19th century challenge to painting, Thompson and his generation are faced with a new question: why make painting in the digital age?” David Joselit, ‘Blanks and Noise: On Cheyney Thompson’’’’, Texte Zur Kunst, No. 77, March 2010, p. 129-32. Pulsating with a vast expanse of ethereal white traversed by a matrix of intricately painted chromatic rasters, the present work belongs to Cheyney Thompson’’’’s acclaimed corpus of Chronochromes. Attained through the magnification of a canvas’’’’ weave pattern, each laboriously hand rendered mark is created using regular modulations of colour associated both to the moment in which they were created and to a colour system invented by the early twentieth-century Boston artist and scholar Albert H. Munsell. Alongside Munsell’’’’s colour system which was one of the earliest methods of applying numerical designations to colour values, Thompson also evokes the innovative orchestral work by Olivier Messiaen, Chronochromie (or Time-Colour) of 1960. Distinguished by subtle prismatic variations, from cobalt violet to cerulean blue and raw sienna, which look to register the flow of time itself, each of Thompson’’’’s Chronochromes is marked by two extreme polarities of colour: luminescent white and saturated black, alluding, respectively, to midday and midnight. In its bold attempt to break down the conventional linearity of brushwork while simultaneously drawing attention to the economics of production and the quantification of labour time, Chronochrome XIII suggests a compelling comparison with Seurat. Just like the French master, Thompson betrays the desire to rationally decompose a continuous visual field into contiguous discrete units. However, as noted by distinguished art historian Yve-Alain Bois, Thompson not only inherits but surpasses Seurat: where the latter relied on optical mixing to re-synthesise in our eyes what he had patiently divided, Thompson exposes the codes of division that he uses in his various series (Simon Baier, Yve-Alain Bois, and Ann Lauterbach, Cheyney Thompson: Metric, Pedestal, Landlord, Cabengo, Recit, London 2012, pp. 4-6). Thompson’’’’s engagement with the current status of painting within competing contemporary technological modes of image production has led to a rigorous interrogation of the medium itself via remarkable works that stimulatingly explore issues of pictorial, economic, and technological abstraction. Faced with such queries, Thompson ultimately addresses art as a system of production and reception, from the minutely controlled brushstrokes, to the exhibition and the market in which they are disseminated.
Pablo Picasso - Oiseau

Pablo Picasso - Oiseau

Original 1963
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 501
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Pablo Picasso 1881 - 1973 OISEAU dated 1.6.63. on the reverse painted and partially glazed ceramic; round plate diameter: 25.4cm., 10in. Executed on 1st June 1963, this work is unique. Provenance Estate of the artist Marina Picasso (the artist’’’’s granddaughter; acquired from the above)
Douglas Kirkland - Marilyn Monroe

Douglas Kirkland - Marilyn Monroe

Original 1961
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 3
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Douglas Kirkland B. 1934 'MARILYN MONROE', 1961 ARCHIVE PIGMENT PRINT. SIGNED, TITLED, DATED AND NUMBERED 8/25 IN PENCIL IN THE LOWER MARGIN. Tirage archive pigment print. Signé, titré, daté et numéroté 8/25 au crayon dans la marge inférieure. Image 47 x 45,8 cm (18 ½ x 18 in.) Feuille 59,4 x 49,7 cm (23 3/8 x 19 ½ in.) This archive pigment print is in excellent condition. Ce tirage est en excellent état.
Pamela Rosenkranz - Because They Try To Bore Holes In My Greatest And Most Beautiful Work (relief Of Avarice)

Pamela Rosenkranz - Because They Try To Bore Holes In My Greatest And Most Beautiful Work (relief Of Avarice)

Original 2012
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 101
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Pamela Rosenkranz B. 1979 BECAUSE THEY TRY TO BORE HOLES IN MY GREATEST AND MOST BEAUTIFUL WORK (RELIEF OF AVARICE) signed on a label affixed to the backing board inkjet print on photographic paper with mounting glue and plexiglass framed: 203.5 by 142cm.; 80 1/8 by 55 7/8 in. Executed in 2012. Provenance Private Collection, Europe Catalogue Note As one of the most exciting artists to emerge in recent years, Pamela Rosenkranz represented Switzerland at the Venice Biennale in 2015 after having already participated at the 5 As one of the most exciting artists to emerge in recent years, Pamela Rosenkranz represented Switzerland at the Venice Biennale in 2015 after having already participated at the 5 th Berlin Biennale and Manifesta 7 in 2008. Her challenging conceptual approach is closely related to the philosophy of Speculative Realism as she melds unfamiliar substances and textures to draw parallels between the composition of things and that of humans in terms of their material reality and synthetic appearance. Executed in 2012, Because They Try to Bore Holes in My Greatest and Most Beautiful Work (Relief of Avarice) is a contemporary homage to the seminal French artist Yves Klein and his chromatic trademark, the patented pigment colour International Klein Blue (IKB). The present work is from an eponymous series of works Rosenkranz created between 2011 and 2012, whose title refers to an excerpt from Klein’’’’s famous ‘Chelsea Hotel Manifesto’’’’, in which he refers to his first monochrome. Recalling a moment of reverie when, as an adolescent, he lay stretched upon the beach of Nice, Klein felt “hatred for birds which flew back and forth across my blue, cloudless sky because they tried to bore holes in my greatest and most beautiful work” (Yves Klein, 'Chelsea Hotel Manifesto', in: Klaus Ottmann, Overcoming the Problematics of Art: The Writings of Yves Klein, New York 2007, p. 200). Taking Klein, whose conception of aesthetics tended towards the metaphysical and the sublime, as a point of departure, Rosenkranz comments on the impossibility of such a perception of art in the digital age of the Internet and social media. Klein’’’’s utopian purity, once punctuated by the hated birds, is further disrupted by Rosenkranz as she takes images of Klein’’’’s monochromes from the internet and blows them up to human scale. In the present work, problems of digital representation and translation pair with an imperfect mounting process by which the artist glues the prints onto plexiglass supports. The resultant scarring and wrinkling reveals Rosenkranz’’’’s structural dependence on process and chance in the production of her monochromes, creating elongated linear patterns that further make formal reference to the exaggerated bodily forms of Klein’’’’s Anthropometries, which were painted by pressing or dragging a painted female body across the canvas. Concerned with paint’’’’s toxicity as a metaphor for the historicity of painting, Because They Try to Bore Holes in My Greatest and Most Beautiful Work (Relief of Avarice) is the continuation of Rosenkranz’’’’s aesthetic dialogue with one of the most radical and revolutionary artists of the Twentieth Century. As the Swiss artist comments herself: “New art comes into art history as a challenge to the immune system of discourse. That is how, generation after generation, art history continues to alter perception” (Pamela Rosenkranz quoted in: Nicolas Bourriaud, 'Art as Virus', Parkett, No. 96, 2015, pp. 77-78). As one of the most exciting artists to emerge in recent years, Pamela Rosenkranz represented Switzerland at the Venice Biennale in 2015 after having already participated at the 5 th Berlin Biennale and Manifesta 7 in 2008. Her challenging conceptual approach is closely related to the philosophy of Speculative Realism as she melds unfamiliar substances and textures to draw parallels between the composition of things and that of humans in terms of their material reality and synthetic appearance. Executed in 2012, Because They Try to Bore Holes in My Greatest and Most Beautiful Work (Relief of Avarice) is a contemporary homage to the seminal French artist Yves Klein and his chromatic trademark, the patented pigment colour International Klein Blue (IKB). The present work is from an eponymous series of works Rosenkranz created between 2011 and 2012, whose title refers to an excerpt from Klein’’’’s famous ‘Chelsea Hotel Manifesto’’’’, in which he refers to his first monochrome. Recalling a moment of reverie when, as an adolescent, he lay stretched upon the beach of Nice, Klein felt “hatred for birds which flew back and forth across my blue, cloudless sky because they tried to bore holes in my greatest and most beautiful work” (Yves Klein, 'Chelsea Hotel Manifesto', in: Klaus Ottmann, Overcoming the Problematics of Art: The Writings of Yves Klein, New York 2007, p. 200). Taking Klein, whose conception of aesthetics tended towards the metaphysical and the sublime, as a point of departure, Rosenkranz comments on the impossibility of such a perception of art in the digital age of the Internet and social media. Klein’’’’s utopian purity, once punctuated by the hated birds, is further disrupted by Rosenkranz as she takes images of Klein’’’’s monochromes from the internet and blows them up to human scale. In the present work, problems of digital representation and translation pair with an imperfect mounting process by which the artist glues the prints onto plexiglass supports. The resultant scarring and wrinkling reveals Rosenkranz’’’’s structural dependence on process and chance in the production of her monochromes, creating elongated linear patterns that further make formal reference to the exaggerated bodily forms of Klein’’’’s Anthropometries, which were painted by pressing or dragging a painted female body across the canvas. Concerned with paint’’’’s toxicity as a metaphor for the historicity of painting, Because They Try to Bore Holes in My Greatest and Most Beautiful Work (Relief of Avarice) is the continuation of Rosenkranz’’’’s aesthetic dialogue with one of the most radical and revolutionary artists of the Twentieth Century. As the Swiss artist comments herself: “New art comes into art history as a challenge to the immune system of discourse. That is how, generation after generation, art history continues to alter perception” (Pamela Rosenkranz quoted in: Nicolas Bourriaud, 'Art as Virus', Parkett, No. 96, 2015, pp. 77-78).
Pierre Amédée Marcel-Beronneau - Orphée

Pierre Amédée Marcel-Beronneau - Orphée

Original 1901
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 32
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Pierre Amédée Marcel-Beronneau ORPHÉE signed, titled and dated ORPHÉE Marcel-Beronneau 1901 lower edge; signed and titled on the reverse oil on canvas 45 x 81 cm. (17¾ x 32 in.) signed, titled and dated ORPHÉE Marcel-Beronneau 1901 lower edge; signed and titled on the reverse Provenance Estate of the Artist Sotheby's Olympia, London, 20 May 2003, lot 294 Acquired from the above by the present owner
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current week's auction

Place Date Artworks Works at Auction
Paris
February 18, 2016
149
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