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Sotheby’s was founded in London on March 11, 1744, when Samuel Baker auctioned “several Hundred scarce and valuable books” from the library of the Rt Hon Sir John Stanley for a few hundred pounds. The story of Sotheby’s expansion beyond books to include the best in fine and decorative arts and jewellery is also the story of the global auction market, defined by extraordinary moments that continue to capture the world’s attention.
Since 1744, Sotheby’s has distinguished itself as a leader in the auction world. Our auctions, conducted in the venerable salerooms in London and Paris, the museum-quality galleries of our headquarters in New York and the spirited environs of Hong Kong rivet audiences worldwide. Season after season, the depth and excellence of Sotheby’s offerings have produced watershed, record-breaking sales. Sotheby’s has been entrusted with the sale of many of the world's treasures, amongst them: Napoleon’s St Helena library, the Duchess of Windsor’s jewels, the Estate of Mrs Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Rembrandt’s Aristotle Contemplating the Bust of Homer, Rubens’ Massacre of the Innocents, Picasso’s Garçon à la Pipe, Bacon’s Triptych, 1976, The Grand Ducal Collections of Baden, the Qianlong Yellow-Ground Famille-Rose Double-Gourd Vase, the 5,000-year-old Guennol Lioness, Giacometti’s L’Homme Qui Marche I, the Magna Carta, the first printing of the Declaration of Independence and The Martin Luther King Jr Collection.
Sotheby’s has long recognised that great works of art, as well as the collectors interested in consigning and acquiring them, inhabit the global sphere. We were the first international auction house to expand from London to New York in 1955, and the first to conduct sales in Hong Kong and the then–Soviet Union. Today we maintain 90 locations in 40 countries and we conduct 250 auctions each year in over 70 categories. In addition to our four principal salerooms, the company, recognising the potential in new markets, also conducts auctions in six other salerooms around the world, further expanding our global reach. Through BIDnow, clients can also watch all Sotheby’s auctions live online and place bids in real time, from anywhere in the world. And through the ever-enriching content on Sothebys.com, the oldest publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange (BID) continues to be fresh and current, while always mindful of its historic roots.
An unwavering commitment to the very highest level of quality remains the goal of one of the most storied names on the global business stage.
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Some works sold by Sotheby's

 Anonymous - The Crucifixion With The Virgin And Saints Mary Magdalene And John The Evangelist

Anonymous - The Crucifixion With The Virgin And Saints Mary Magdalene And John The Evangelist

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 111
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Master of the Corsi Crucifix ACTIVE IN FLORENCE IN THE EARLY 14TH CENTURY THE CRUCIFIXION WITH THE VIRGIN AND SAINTS MARY MAGDALENE AND JOHN THE EVANGELIST, CIRCA 1315-1320 tempera on panel, gold ground with a shaped top 12 1/2 by 7 3/8 in.; 31.7 by 18.9 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Anonymous sale, London, Sotheby's, 16 March 1966, lot 9 (as Pacino di Buonaguida, sold at that time with a certificate from Roberto Longhi). This unpublished crucifixion scene was identified by Andrea De Marchi as the work of the Master of the Corsi Crucifix, a highly individual painter, working in Florence in the first quarter of the 14th century, in the immediate wake of Giotto. De Marchi dates this panel to before 1330 and such is the quality of its execution, that Roberto Longhi had previously considered the painting to be by Pacino da Buonaguida (see Provenance). While the Master of the Corsi Crucifix remains as yet anonymous, his rich and unique style is instantly recognizable, setting him apart from other Florentine hands. Richard Offner named the master after a painted cross which he published in 1931 (fig. 1), at that time in the Corsi collection and now in a private collection, Florence. 1 Offner published the cross alongside another in the Accademia delle Belle Arti, Florence, grouping them under the same name. 2 He described the painter as “a master of dramatic talent” and considered him to relate very closely to the Master of Saint Cecilia, an assistant in Giotto’’s Florentine workshop. 3 Offner’’s praise of the Master of the Corsi Crucifix is well founded. Not only are his figures beautifully conceived, they are intensely expressive, conveying the pathos of the scene in a convincing yet understated manner. Saint John the Evangelist is painted here with a miniaturist’’s precision, his face contorted with anguish, his fingers clenched in his curling hair. Offner dated the Corsi and the Accademia crosses to no later than 1325, a premise later refined by Miklós Boskovits in 1984, who suggested their most likely date of execution to be circa 1315. 4 Luisa Marcucci found the artist’’s style close to that of a series of frescoes in the chapel of San Jacopo in Badia di Settimo, near Florence. On that basis, she offered an identification of the Master of the Corsi Crucifix to their author, the young Buonamico Buffalmacco, though this suggestion does not appear to have been upheld by more recent scholarship. 5 Boskovits instead offered an alternative hypothesis. Comparing works by the Master of the Corsi Crucifix with those by the so-called Master of the Cappella dei Veluti, he tentatively proposed the two painters might be one and the same, a suggestion Angelo Tartuferi agrees should be pursued further. 6 We are grateful to Andrea De Marchi for suggesting the attribution on the basis of photographs and to Laurence Kanter for endorsing it upon firsthand inspection. 1. R. Offner, A Cristical and Historical Corpus of Florentine Painting, The fourteenth century, section III, sec. III, vol. I, p. 56 – 57. 2. R. Offner, Corpus of Florentine Painting, The fourteenth century, sec. III, vol. I, Florence 1986, pp. 188 - 191. 3. Ibid., p. 187. 4. M. Boskovits, “The Painters of the Miniaturist Tendency”, in Corpus of Florentine Painting, sec. III, vol. IX, Florence 1984, pp. 21 – 22, 149. 5. L. Marcucci, Galerie Nazionali di Firenze, I dipinti toscani del secolo XIV, Rome 1965, p. 26; A. Tartuferi in, Moretti: Dalla tradizione gotica al primo rinascimento, Florence 2009, pp. 18. 6. M. Boskovits, op. cit.; A. Tartuferi, op. cit. Fig. 1 Master of the Corsi Crucifix, Crucifixion , Private Collection, Florence
Theo Van Rysselberghe - Vue D'istanbul

Theo Van Rysselberghe - Vue D'istanbul

Original 1895
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 101
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Théo van Rysselberghe 1862 - 1926 VUE D'ISTANBUL signed with the artist's monogram (lower left) oil on canvas 32.2 by 40.7cm., 12 5/8 by 16in. Painted circa 1895. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication This work will be included in the forthcoming supplement to the Catalogue raisonné of works by Théo van Rysselberghe being prepared by Ronald Feltkamp. Provenance Galerie Arnold, Dresden Private Collection, Austria Thence by descent to the present owner in 1999
Aristide Maillol - Nu Debout Se Coiffant

Aristide Maillol - Nu Debout Se Coiffant

Original 1898
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 2
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Aristide Maillol 1861 - 1944 NU DEBOUT SE COIFFANT (BAIGNEUSE AUX BRAS LEVÉS) inscribed with the monogram M, with the foundry mark Alexis Rudier Fondeur Paris and numbered 5/6 bronze height: 157.5cm. Conceived in 1898, enlarged to the present size in 1930 and cast during the artist's lifetime.
 Master Of The Ashmolean Predella - Madonna And Child With Angels, The Crucifixion Above

Master Of The Ashmolean Predella - Madonna And Child With Angels, The Crucifixion Above

Attributed
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 403
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Attributed to The Master of the Ashmolean Predella ACTIVE IN FLORENCE CIRCA 1360 - 1385-90 MADONNA AND CHILD WITH ANGELS, THE CRUCIFIXION ABOVE tempera on panel, gold ground, in an engaged shaped frame 34 3/8 by 14 1/4 in.; 87.3 by 36.2 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Gifted by the mother-in-law of the present owner. We are grateful to Dr. Laurence Kanter for suggesting an attribution to The Master of the Ashmolean Predella, based on photographs.
Francis Picabia - Cornély

Francis Picabia - Cornély

Original 1922
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 61
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Francis Picabia 1879 - 1953 CORNÉLY signed Francis Picabia (lower right) and titled (upper left) gouache, pencil and brush and pen and ink on paper 59.6 by 72.5cm. 23 1/2 by 28 1/2 in. Executed in 1922. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication To be included in the forthcoming Picabia Catalogue raisonné being prepared by the Comité Picabia. Provenance Galerie Augustinci, Paris Private Collection, Versailles (acquired from the above in the 1950s) Thence by descent to the present owner The early 1920s saw the disintegration of the Dada movement. Francis Picabia sought a new, more refined, mechanical aesthetic, alongside the reintroduction of those figurative elements which would form the basis of his later work. Cornély, executed in 1922, belongs to a group of paintings (fig. 1) and works on paper which are composed of non-ideogrammatic forms, often with enjoyably obscure, non-descriptive titles. William A. Camfield classified these important works as being executed in a ‘late Dada-machinist style’’ (W. A. Camfield, Francis Picabia – His Art, Life and Times, Princeton, 1979, p. 191). ‘The term’’, Francis N. Naumann explains, ‘indicates a formal connection between the Dada movement and Picabia’’s earlier mechanomorphic paintings. The oils and watercolors produced in this period are characterized by a less harshly defined machine aesthetic, with sexual allusions, if any, expressed in only an indirect or enigmatic fashion. The principal subjects of these works were usually drawn from components within the realm of the physical sciences: astronomical charts, electrical symbols, optical experiments, illustrations of wave lengths, magnetic fields, etc. In most cases, these scientific elements are either presented within the context of a non-objective composition, or become the backdrop for a more complex figurative ensemble. Several paintings from this period incorporate circular wave patterns, while others present a field of horizontal or vertical bands, probably derived from a scientific diagram to illustrate diffracted light waves’’ (F. N. Naumann in correspondence with Sotheby’’s, 2013). The Dada movement petered out amidst in-fighting and disaffection. Some chose to follow André Breton towards the formation of the Surrealist movement, whilst others such Tristan Tzara held on to their principles. In 1921 Picabia stated: ‘The Dada spirit really only existed between 1913 and 1918... In wishing to prolong it, Dada became closed... Dada, you see, was not serious... and if certain people take it seriously now, it's because it is dead! […] One must be a nomad, pass through ideas like one passes through countries and cities' (Francis Picabia quoted in Robert Motherwell, (ed.), The Dada Painters and Poets, London, 1989, p. 201). Indeed one of the artist’’s famous aphorisms was: ‘If you want to have clean ideas, change them as often as you change your shirts’’, and in creating the ‘Dada-machinist’’ works, Picabia sought to re-invent his own visual repertoire. The present work’’s wild arabesques are drawn from the patterns which guided the manufacturing process of lace making, and the title refers to a popular sewing-machine built by Ercole Cornély in France which was capable of producing intricate stitching. This run-of-the-mill source, however, does not preclude other symbolic interpretations and allusions which hitherto formed a significant part of Picabia’’s œuvre. The numerous circular elements in Cornély, some bisected like the head of a screw or closed eyelids, are quintessential Picabia; as Camfield writes: ‘Dots and circles, prominent in his work since 1912, became so ubiquitous during 1922 that he must have attached special significance to them. [...] they had already been used to represent wheels, gears, gramophone records, targets and erotic zones’’ (W. A. Camfield, op. cit., p. 196). Fig. 1 FRANCIS PICABIA, Volucelle II, 1922, ripolin on canvas. Sold: Sotheby's, New York, 6th November 2013
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current week's auction

Place Date Artworks Works at Auction
New York
January 28, 2015
202
New York
January 29, 2015
26
New York
January 29, 2015
175
New York
January 29, 2015
104
New York
January 30, 2015
198
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