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Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida

Spain (1863 -  1923 ) Wikipedia® : Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida
SOROLLA Y BASTIDA Joaquin Spanish Niña En La Playa De Valencia

Sotheby's
Dec 13, 2017
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Variants on Artist's name :

Sorolla Y Bastida Joaquín

 

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Artworks in Arcadja
353

Some works of Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida

Extracted between 353 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Spanish Elena En La Playa, Biarritz

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Spanish Elena En La Playa, Biarritz

Original 1906
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Lot number: 9
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Joaquín Sorolla SPANISH ELENA EN LA PLAYA, BIARRITZ 1863 - 1923 signed and dated J Sorolla B / 1906 lower left oil on board 15.5 by 22cm.,6 by 9¾in. We are grateful to Blanca Pons-Sorolla for her assistance in cataloguing this work, which will be included in her forthcomingSorolla catalogue raisonné (BPS 3771). Provenance Elena Sorolla García, Madrid (gift by the artist,her father) Exhibited London, Grafton Galleries, Exhibition of Paintings by Señor Sorolla y Bastida at the Grafton Galleries, 1908 Catalogue Note Following Sorolla's singular triumph of his first solo exhibition at the Galerie Georges Petitin Paris in June and July 1906, Sorolla spent the rest of the summer at Biarritz. There, galvanised by his success, he was immediately attracted to the life of the leisured classes on the beach, which became the subject of a series of paintings (fig. 1).The present work is altogether more intimate and familiar,being ofthe artist\’s daughter Elena, aged nine,here portrayed in profile wearing a pink dressand a straw hat and looking out to sea. The climate, the clientele, and crowdedness of Biarritz required anew and different painterly approach to the one Sorolla followed in the Mediterranean. Working all day on the beach, his output in the French resort was distinguished by more small format paintings rather than large canvases, possibly because the sheer number ofbeachgoers made it more difficult to compose a large painting, or perhaps as a response to the quickly changing Atlantic light. Sorolla\’s masteryat capturing the moment in impressionistic brushstrokes is clearly palpable inhis Biarritz works. Describing the artist\’s stay in Biarritz, diplomat and politician Mauricio López-Roberts, Marqui of Torrelaguna noted: \‘among the throng of the tents, the parasols, and the reddish sunshades swelling in convex curves over the Grande Plage, Sorolla walks in his hunt for impressions. [...] And the painter's eyes, very wide open and determined eyes witha frank gaze, the eyes of a seafarer or an explorer, which see far and see everything, are filled with emotion as they contemplate the shifting and luminous appearances of the waves, and the strong and energetic shadows blackening on the golden mantle of the beach. Sorolla finds no pleasure in life if he does not paint, if he does not splash, two, three, four studies a day, and at the same time he is planning pictures, works of the future ('Crónica de arte: Sorolla en Biarritz', Blanco y negro, n. 805, 1906, pp. 11-13).
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida -  Pavilion Of Charles V, Alcázar Of Seville

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Pavilion Of Charles V, Alcázar Of Seville

Original 1908
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Lot number: 9
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PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE FAMILY COLLECTION Joaquín Sorolla SPANISH PAVILION OF CHARLES V, ALCÁZAR OF SEVILLE 1863 - 1923 signed J. Sorolla B and dated 1908 (lower left) oil on canvas 25 by 37 1/2 in. 63.5 by 95.3 cm We are grateful to Blanca Pons-Sorolla for her assistance in cataloguing this work, which will be included in her forthcomingSorolla catalogue raisonné (BPS 1893). Provenance Louis Comfort Tiffany, Cold Spring Harbor, New York(acquired in 1909 from the New York Exhibition and sold, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, September 28, 1946, lot 998) Private Collection (acquired at the above sale) Kurt Stern, New York Sr. Karger, Barcelona (by 1948) Juan Soto Ventura, Venezuela (by circa 1950) Private Collection (acquired from the above bycirca 1970) Thence by descent Exhibited London, Grafton Galleries,Exhibition of Paintings by Señor Sorolla y Bastida, 1908 New York, The Hispanic Society of America,Paintings by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida Exhibited by the Hispanic Society of America, February 8-March 8, 1909, no. 25 Barcelona, Exposición de homenaje a Sorolla, 1948 Dallas, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University; The San Diego Museum of Art, Sorolla and America, December 13, 2013-August 26, 2014, no. 63 Madrid, Fundación Mapfre, Sorolla y Estados Unidos, September 26, 2014-January 11, 2015, no. 64 Literature Eight Essays on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,New York, 1909, vol. I, p. 103, no. 25, illustrated Bernardino de Pantorba,La Vida y la Obra de Joaquín Sorolla,Madrid, 2nd edition, 1970, p. 192, no. 1648 José Luis Diez and Javier Baróm,Joaquín Sorolla, 1863-1923, exh. cat., Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado, 2009, pp. 419, 421 Blanca Pons-Sorolla, "Landscapes and Gardens,"Sorolla and America, exh. cat., Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travelling, 2013,pp. 139, 186, illustrated p. 198 Blanca Pons-Sorolla, \“Catálogo,\” Sorolla y Estados Unidos, exh. cat.,Fundación Mapfre, 2014, pp. 185,345, cited p. 281, no. 64, illustrated Roberta A. Mayer, \“Kindred Spirits: Louis Comfort Tiffany and Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,\” Sorolla in America: Friends and Patrons,exh. cat., Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travelling, 2015, pp. 297, 299, illustrated p. 301 Catalogue Note Joaquín Sorolla was frequently commissioned to paint portraits of dignitaries, socialites, friends and royalty, and in January 1908, the artist was invited to Seville to paint a second portrait of Queen Victoria Eugenie of Spain (Fundación Álvaro de Bázan, Madrid). The busy mother of an infant prince, pregnant with her second child, Queen Victoria Eugenie often canceled her appointments with Sorolla, and he took advantage of this time to paint the gardens of the Reales Alcázares de Sevilla (Blanca Pons-Sorolla, \“Biography after 1902,\” Sorolla, Gardens of Light, exh. cat., Museo de Bellas Artes and Museo Sorolla, 2012, p. 9). During this sojourn he wrote frequently to his wife Clotilde and in a letter dated February 4, 1908 he describes the manicured courtyards and gardens of the Sevillian palace, essentially describing the present scene: \“You\’d like this because the ground is never trampled, it\’s all paved in patterned tiles; the tiled fountains, all enclosed by myrtle, give it a poetic note that\’s very charming\” (as quoted in Pons-Sorolla, p. 9). He continued, \“I find I am obliged to begin the portrait of Viana [Marquess of Viana]… while I\’m doing the thing that earns me money, I have to deprive myself of the pleasure of painting something in the gardens\” (as quoted in María López Fernández, \“Garden,\”Sorolla, Gardens of Light, p. 138). The gardens of Seville, and especially the Garden of the Grotesque in the Alcázar, which Sorolla painted in 1908 as well, left a lasting impression, as the artist replicated the two columns visible in the background of the present work in the gardens of Casa Sorolla, built in 1909 and now the Museo Sorolla in Madrid (fig. 1). He left Seville at the end of February 1908 with his portrait of the Queen as well as sixteen pictures of the gardens of the Alcázar and the surrounding city, including Pavilion of Charles V, Alcázar of Seville. This Sevillian group provided the core of Sorolla\’s one-man show at London\’s Grafton Galleries, held in summer 1908, where 450 works were viewed by many of the artist\’s peers such as Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Sir John Lavery, John Singer Sargent and Anders Zorn. The 1908 show introduced Sorolla to the wealthy American collector and philanthropist Archer M. Huntington, who would become the artist\’s most influential patron. Huntington immediately invited Sorolla to exhibit in New York at The Hispanic Society of America, the institution Huntington founded in 1904 in celebration of Spanish arts and culture. Sorolla\’s New York show was an immediate success, with almost 170,000 visitors over its four week view in spring 1909. The artist found a receptive audience in America, selling over 150 works during the course of the New York exhibition, and a further 45 works when the exhibition continued to the Buffalo Fine Art Academy and the Copley Society of Boston (Blanca Pons-Sorolla, "Chronology," Sorolla and America, exh. cat., Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travelling, 2013, p. 295). Paintings were acquired by Miss Dorothy Whitney (Palacio de Carlos V, Alcázar de Sevilla, sold in these rooms May 9, 2013, lot 60) and the Albright Art Gallery (Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino, sold in these rooms January 31, 2018, lot 37). Pavilion of Charles V, Alcázar of Seville was acquired by the glass designer Louis Comfort Tiffany for $600, perhaps in part because the painting captured the Moorish design elements that Tiffany had used to great effect in his Long Island estate Laurelton Hall (Mayer, p. 299-300). The artists\’ respect for each other is illustrated by a 1911 portrait that Tiffany commissioned, placing him in his lush Long Island garden (fig. 2). The portrait remained in the Moorish-style patio of Laurelton Hall, just steps from where it was painted, until it was donated to The Hispanic Society of America by the Tiffany family.
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Viejo Castellano Sirviéndose Vino(the Old Man Of Castille)

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Viejo Castellano Sirviéndose Vino(the Old Man Of Castille)

Original 1907
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Lot number: 37
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Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida VIEJO CASTELLANO SIRVIÉNDOSE VINO(THE OLD MAN OF CASTILLE) VALENCIA 1863 - 1923 CERCEDILLA signed and dated lower right:J. Sorolla B1907 oil on canvas 82 1/4 by 41 1/4 in. 209 by 105 cm We are grateful to Blanca Pons Sorolla for her assistance in cataloguing this work, which will be included in her forthcomingSorolla catalogue raisonné (BPS 1880). Provenance Fine Arts Academy, Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo (acquired in 1909 from the New York Exhibition through the Elizabeth G. Gates Fund for $2,400); By whom sold, New York, Parke-Bernet Galleries, 14 October 1943, lot 63; Private Collection, Madrid, by the mid-1960s; Thence by descent in the family; By whom anonymously sold (\“Property from a Private Collection\”), London, Sotheby\’s, 10 December 2014, lot 51, for $305,145; There acquired. Exhibited London, Grafton Galleries, Exhibition of Paintings by Senor Sorolla y Bastida, 1908 (as The Glass of Wine); New York, The Hispanic Society of America; Buffalo, Fine Arts Academy; Boston, Copley Society of Art: Paintings by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, Exhibited by the Hispanic Society of America, 8 February - 11 May 1909, no. 89 (New York); no. 61 (Boston and Buffalo) (as Viejo castellano / Old Castilian); Toronto, Canadian National Exhibition, 1922; Dallas, The Texas Fine Art Association, 1923; Toledo, The Toledo Museum of Art, 1928; Dayton, The Dayton Art Institute, 1930. Literature A. de Beruete, C. Mauclair, H. Rochefort, L. Williams, E. Cary, J.G. Huneker, C. Brinton and W.E.B. Starkweather, Eight Essays on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, New York 1909, vol. I, p. 295, cat. no. 89, reproduced (as Viejo castellano); Catalogue of Paintings by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, exhibited by The Hispanic Society of America, exhibition catalogue, New York 1909, cat. no. 89, reproduced p. 92 (as Viejo castellano / Old Castilian); \“Joaquín Sorolla-y-Bastida: His Wonderful Collection of Paintings at the Albright Gallery,\” inAcademy Notes, April 1909, vol. IV, p. 185, cat. no. 11, reproduced p. 182 (as An Old Castillian); C. Brinton, \“Two Great Spanish Painters: Sorolla and Zuloaga,\” in The Century Magazine, May 1909, p. 31, reproduced (as The Old Castillian); T.R. Ibarra, \“The American Success of a Great Spanish Painter,\” New York 1909, p. II562, reproduced (as An Old Castillian); \“In Memoriam: Joaquín Sorolla,\” in Academy Notes, July-December 1923, vol. XVIII, p. 77, cat. no. 2; B. de Pantorba, La vida y obra de Joaquín Sorolla, Madrid 1970, p. 190, cat. no. 1622 (as Viejo Castellano sirviéndose vino); Joaquín Sorolla, 1863-1923, exhibition catalogue, Madrid 2009, p. 381, reproduced fig. 271; Sorolla and America, exhibition catalogue, Dallas 2013, p. 302, cat. no. 32, reproduced; Sorolla y Estados Unidos, exhibition catalogue, Madrid 2014, p. 350, reproduced; J.L. Colomer, B. Pons-Sorolla, and M.A. Roglán, Sorolla in America: Friends and Patrons, Dallas 2015, p. 165, reproduced p. 168. Catalogue Note Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida\’s impressive life-sized Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino (The Old Man of Castille) was painted in 1907, a particularly successful and productive year for the artist\’s figural painting. This compositional series can be divided into themes: portraits of Spanish royals, members of Sorolla\’s family and, as with the present work, depictions of regional people. Sorolla began the series in El Pardo, north of Madrid, and later Segovia, while his daughter María recovered from tuberculosis, before traveling further north to Léon, where he made extensive oil sketches and drawings of local life. These studies shaped the present work and others of the period, which demonstrate the artist\’s interest in ethnography and variations in Spain\’s regional dress, customs, and culture. The \“old man\” of the present work is enrobed by multiple layers of a heavy brown cloak— with textured swaths of paint and subtle tonal shifts suggesting its rough-spun cloth—which frames his grey stubbled and sun-reddened skin, as a bandaged hand emerges to pour wine from a green and yellow glazed clay pitcher. The dark, earthy tones of the man\’s costume stand against the white plaster wall, the bright sun casting the shifting shadow of an unseen tree. Sorolla\’s expressive brushwork, impressionistic shifts of light and shade, and cropping of the compositional space suggest both a casually observed moment of daily life and careful study. The present work directly informed Sorolla\’s larger composition Leonese Peasants (1907, The Hispanic Society of America, New York, fig. 1), in which a similar cloaked figure stands among a group of market-goers, each individual serving as a realist portrait linking regional traditions and contemporary Spain. Beyond his facility with a paintbrush, Sorolla was also an astute businessman, finding success at international art competitions in Paris and London which led him to a series of well received exhibitions in both Europe and the United States. Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino was featured in one of the first of these exhibitions, Sorolla\’s one-man show at London\’s Grafton Galleries in 1908. The following year, philanthropist Archer M. Huntington invited the artist to exhibit at The Hispanic Society of America, the institution he founded in New York City. On opening day in February 1909, the present work joined 355 other paintings by the artist on view for four weeks, during which 170,000 visitors purchased 28,000 copies of the catalogue. While over the course of the New York exhibition Sorolla sold 150 paintings, Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino travelled to the Albright Art Gallery on the invitation of its director Charles M. Kurtz who anticipated the show would \“be worth traveling hundreds of miles to see and study\” (the exhibition\’s final venue was The Copley Society of Boston) (\“Joaquin Sorolla-y-Bastida, A Modern Master,\” Academy Notes, vol. IV, no. 10, March 1909, p. 172). Though a smaller show, the huge crowds remained, with a local newspaper reporting \“never in the history of the gallery has there been such an attendance at any exhibition. Throngs are in the gallery at all hours and many persons make almost daily visits there\” (\“Last Week of Sorolla,\” Buffalo Morning Express, April 5, 1909, as quoted in Blanca Pons-Sorolla, \“Sorolla and America,\” Sorolla and America, exh. cat, Meadows Museum, Dallas; The San Diego Museum of Art, 2014, p. 22). As testified to by Kurtz (and illustrated by a contemporary photo of the installation (fig. 2) Sorolla\’s work had never before been so beautifully displayed \“with exceedingly liberal spacing… and where the pictures are grouped together, the arrangement is such that each work appears to be enhanced by juxtaposition with the others\” (\“Joaquín Sorolla-y-Bastida: His Wonderful Collection of Paintings at the Albright Gallery,\” Academy Notes, April 1909, vol. IV, no. 11 p. 163). Notably, Kurtz, explained \“one cannot fail to be impressed by the painting, \“An Old Castilian,\” hanging on the marble doorway in the north wall…. This is a work as strong, as realistic, and as typically Spanish as anything painted by Velásquez. It is one of the great works of the collection\” and unsurprisingly soon entered the permanent collection for the Albright Art Gallery (\“Joaquín Sorolla-y-Bastida: His Wonderful Collection of Paintings at the Albright Gallery,\” p. 185). Beyond its impressive technique and scale, Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino was a particularly apt selection for an American institution. In its subject of a humble figure absorbed in a daily task, the portrait\’s theme appealed to an American public used to paintings of rural individualism in contemporary European and American art. At the same time, as Kurtz recognized, the monumental portrait of the common man connected Sorolla to the foundational giants of Spanish art history, notably Velásquez — whose seventeenth-century experiments in realism through his genre portraiture, such as his Menippus of circa 1638, had reinvigorated other Spanish artists seeking ways to communicate the essence of their country (Joaquín Sorolla 1863-1923, exh. cat., Museo Nacional del Prado, 2009, p. 380-1. fig. 3). Aptly, when illustrated in the exhibition catalogue, the present work was accompanied by a discussion both of Sorolla\’s inheritance of Old Master traditions and his modern spirit of \“sincerity and actuality and sympathy\” which made his \“rendering of Spanish life at once so beautiful and so robust, establishing our belief that not only are they of vital interest now, but of a value which shall palpitate in far futurity\” (Leonard Williams, \“The Art of Joaquín Sorolla,\” Catalogue of Paintings by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, exh. cat., 1909, p. 43). Indeed, Viejo castellano sirviéndose vino helped secure the artist\’s international reputation, the image seen as both specifically Spanish and universally human, a theme the artist would expand in his epic series of celebrated murals, the Vision of Spain, which he painted for The Hispanic Society just four years later. Fig. 1 Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, Leonese Peasants, 1907, The Hispanic Society of America, New York Fig. 2 Photograph of the north wall of gallery XIII during the Sorolla exhibition at the Albright Art Gallery. Fig. 3 Diego Velázquez, Menippus, circa 1636-1640, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid Fig. 4 Diego Velázquez, The Waterseller of Seville, circa 1618–1622. English Heritage, The Wellington Collection, Apsley House, London
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Spanish Niña En La Playa De Valencia

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Spanish Niña En La Playa De Valencia

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 24
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PROPERTY FROM A SPANISH PRIVATE COLLECTION Joaquín Sorolla SPANISH NIÑA EN LA PLAYA DE VALENCIA (GIRL ON VALENCIA BEACH) Joaquín Sorolla 1863 - 1923 oil on canvas 34.5 by 50.5cm., 13½ by 20in. Provenance Estate of the artist Elena Sorolla García, Madrid (the artist's daughter); thence by descent to the present owner Exhibited Madrid, Salón de Exposiciones Toisón, Apuntes y Dibujos de Joaquín Sorolla, de la Colección de sus hijas Maria y Elena, 1953 Madrid, Cason del Buen Retiro,Primer Centenario del Nacimiento de Sorolla, 1963, no. 77 Madrid, Galería Theo, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1968, no. 23 Literature Bernardino de Pantorba, La vida y la obra de Joaquín Sorolla. Estudio biográfico y crítico, Madrid, 1970, p. 161, no. 897, catalogued Catalogue Note Painted in the summer of 1916 on the beach at Valencia. Sorolla's time in Valencia that year was limitedby his on-goingobligation to work on Visions of Spain, the commission that he had received from Archer Milton Huntington in 1911.Apart from his miniature apuntes and a number of portraits, for the past five years Sorolla had been working relentlessly on these murals destined to decorate the Hispanic Society in New York, a task thatwould not be completed until 1919. It was ahuge painterly undertaking and entailed extensive travel to all the Spanish regions.But with the project taking its physical and mental toll, Sorolla took a break in 1916,joining his family on the beach at Valencia that summer and painting once more for himself. Over these months Sorolla enjoyed a period of intense creativity, and painted some of his most accomplished works, including a run of paintings, the present work amongst them, that depict children and young girls in the shade of a make-shift bathing hut. (fig. 1). Executed with the economy of means and the painterly flourish that had become the hall-marks of his style, the overall palette that Sorolla adopted was relatively neutral. However, in delineating the space in which the young girl is situated he used a wide range of hues, including greens, pinks and purples as well asa full compliment of ochres.Of particular note is his use ofthe colour violetto convey shadow in the girl's face, a device borrowed directly from the Impressionists and the Fauves, and Matisse in particular. As early as 1909, Sorolla, who deliberately distanced himself from any formal association with the French Impressionists, concedes: 'with all its excesses, the modern impressionistic movement has given us one discovery, the colour violet. It is the only discovery of importance in the art world since Velázquez.' (W.E.B. Starkweather, 'Joaquin Sorolla: The Man and His Work', in A. de Beruete et al., Eight Essays on Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida, New York, 1909, vol. 2, p. 40). Fig. 1, Joaquín Sorolla, La niña curiosa, 1916, Private Collection
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida -  Llegada De Las Barcas

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Llegada De Las Barcas

Original 1903
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Gross Price
Lot number: 111
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Description:
Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (Spanish, 1863-1923) Llegada de las barcas signed 'J Sorolla' (lower right) oil on canvas 11 3/8 x 17 ½ in. (29 x 44 cm.) Painted circa 1903. Painted in 1903 when Sorolla\\\’s style had fully matured, this atmospheric and extraordinarily fluid composition depicts the fishermen\\\’s return and the unloading of the catch. An expressive snapshot which energetically renders the reflections, movement and intense colours of light and water, the painting has all the hallmarks of the artist\\\’s most spontaneous canvases. Sorolla is defined in the public imagination by his paintings of the beach, and the activities, both of leisure and work, which took place upon it. As José Luis Díez writes: \\\“An intense perception of the sea and shore was intrinsic to Sorolla\\\’s artistic personality from the very start. The Mediterranean Sea that bordered his birthplace was always the horizon of his most personal and inner space…His vision of his subjects is characterised by two main thematic axes. First the presence of children and adolescent boys are generally nude while girls wear light tunics in the mixed space at the water\\\’s edge or in the sea. These allowed him to study the way light reflects on wet bodies and also the graceful movement of those bodies under the full sunlight of the Levante…in the living, changing space of the beach, free of the artifice of the studio. Second, the beach was also an ideal location for observing bourgeois social relations. In both of these thematic areas, Sorolla achieved an essential visual and representative unity of figures and their surroundings the beach, rocks or the sea.\\\” (Exh. cat., Joaquín Sorolla, Prado, Madrid, 2009, p. 69). Within a canon of imagery which includes fisherman landing their catches, the billowing sails of their boats, elegant ladies in parasols, and children playing, a virtual constant is the water\\\’s edge. Sorolla was the master of the fluid brushstroke, reflected in his ability to capture subtleties of expression and movement, and to conjure up atmospheric effects, both with the same fluency and economy of means. The present work is notable for its broad, sweeping brushstrokes, which brilliantly describe the swirling eddies of the churning water, and for its impressionistic composition. The picture plane is filled entirely with action, from the movement of water and figures to the large billowing sales overhead. The scene is infused with light from above, which is reflected off the water in a palette of blue, pink, green and purple. We are grateful to Blanca Pons-Sorolla for confirming the authenticity of this painting on the basis of a photograph, which will be included in her forthcoming Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida catalogue raisonné with the provisional number BPS 1430. The present lot has a certificate of authenticity by Francisco Pons Sorolla (dated 27 February 1973 ).
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