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Egon Schiele

Austria (1890 -  1918 ) Wikipedia® : Egon Schiele
SCHIELE Egon Liegendes Mädchen Mit Schwarzen Strümpfen

Sotheby's /May 17, 2017
275,836.70 - 459,727.84
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
867

Some works of Egon Schiele

Extracted between 867 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Egon Schiele - Female Nude

Egon Schiele - Female Nude

Original 1917
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Lot number: 206
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Egon Schiele (Tulln 1890 - 1918 Wien) Female nude, 1917 black chalk on paper ; 45.8 × 29.8 cm signed and dated on the lower left: Egon / Schiele / 1917 Provenance Otto Stoessl (1875-1936), in 1917 or 1918 acquired directly from the artist, until 1936; Franz Stoessl (1910-1988), after his death in property of his widow Rudolfine Stoessl (1922-2013), during her lifetime given as a present to a member of the family of the current owner; since then private property, Austria Jane Kallir examined the work in original and confirmed the authenticity. She will include the work to her supplement of the catalogue raisonné under the number: D. 1949a. Photo certificate by Jane Kallir, from 27 April 2017, attached.
Egon Schiele - Franz Hauer

Egon Schiele - Franz Hauer

Original 1914
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Lot number: 2
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Egon Schiele (Tulln 1890-1918 Vienna) \“Franz Hauer\”, 1914/1922, etching, probably from an edition of 80 for the portfolio \“Das graphische Werk von Egon Schiele\”, image size 12.7 x 10.8 cm, the sheet trimmed, mounted, framed, Kallir 5c, (EW) Prints from the portfolio \“Das graphische Werk von Egon Schiele\” were also sold individually after 1922. Many of these prints are neither signed by hand nor do they feature a signature stamp. (Cf Otto Kallir, Egon Schiele. Das Druckgraphische Werk, Paul Zsolnay Verlag, 1970, p. 108) Specialist: Mag. Elisabeth Wallner
Egon Schiele - Secession 49

Egon Schiele - Secession 49

Original 1957
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Lot number: 7
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Sale 2449 Lot 7 EGON SCHIELE (1890-1918) SECESSION 49. AUSSTELLUNG. 1918. 26 1/2x20 3/4 inches, 67 1/4x52 3/4 cm. Alb. Berger, Vienna. Condition B+: minor loss in lower left corner; repaired tears at edges, some affecting image; water stains and pin holes in corners and margins; unobtrusive horizontal fold. Mounted on Japan. Matted and framed. Schiele was one of the meteoric talents of the Secession movement. Unlike the colorful and decorative work of the early Secessionists, Schiele's output was darker and more intense, highlighted by powerful, erotic and figurative imagery. He can rightfully be considered one of the first Expressionists. As part of the Secession's 49th Exhibition, Schiele was granted an entire room to display the fifty of his works that had been chosen. He also designed the exhibition poster itself. The resulting intimate scene of "a group of like-minded people, quite content in each other's company" (Schiele p. 198), has various titles such as "Die Tafelrunde" and "Die Freunde," which leaves its meaning open to interpretation. But, as it was finished during the final year of the First World War, it is generally accepted to be "a sentimental tribute to a disappearing world" (Denscher p. 59). The people around the table have been identified as various artist friends of Schiele's (who is seated at the top of the poster). The empty seat opposite him is said to be intended for Gustav Klimt, who died about a month prior to the exhibition's opening. It was this exhibition that launched Schiele as an internationally important artist. Tragically, Schiele died during the Spanish Flu pandemic later that year. Mo MA 24.1957, Modern Poster p. 75, Denscher p. 56, Weill p. 118, Maitres 1900 p. 185, Verfuhrungen p. 38.
Egon Schiele - Liegendes Mädchen Mit Schwarzen Strümpfen

Egon Schiele - Liegendes Mädchen Mit Schwarzen Strümpfen

Original 1913
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Lot number: 170
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Egon Schiele LIEGENDES MÄDCHEN MIT SCHWARZEN STRÜMPFEN (RECLINING GIRL WITH BLACK STOCKING) 1890 - 1918 Signed Egon Schiele and dated 1913.(center right); numbered No. 921 by another hand (lower left) Watercolor and pencil on paper 12 1/4 by 19 in. 31.1 by 48.3 cm Executed in 1913. Provenance Otto Kallir, Vienna Vita Maria Künstler, Vienna Galerie Würthe, Vienna Wolfgang Fischer (Fischer Fine Art, Ltd.), London Anthony Abroms, Dallas (and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 12, 1988, lot 158) Acquired at the above sale
Egon Schiele - Danaë

Egon Schiele - Danaë

Original 1909
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Lot number: 27
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Egon Schiele DANAË 1890 - 1918 Signed Schiele Egon and dated 1909 (lower right) Oil and metallic paint on canvas 31 5/8 by 49 3/8 in. 80.2 by 125.4 cm Painted in 1909. Herr Kohn, Vienna (probably until 1928) Rob Verlag, Vienna (acquired by 1930) Siegfried & Gesche Poppe, Hamburg (acquired by 1961) Dr Rudolf Leopold, Vienna Achim Moeller Fine Arts, New York Private Collector (acquired from the above in the early 1980s) Acquired from the above in 2007 Exhibited Vienna, Neue Galerie, Gedächtnisausstellung Egon Schiele, 1928, no. 4 Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Art autrichien du vingtième siècle, 1961, no. 177 Frankfurt-am-Main, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Vom Impressionismus zum Bauhaus: Meisterwerke aus deutschem Privatbesitz, 1966, no. 72 Munich, Haus der Kunst, Egon Schiele, 1975, no. 77 Hamburg, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Experiment Weltuntergang: Wien um 1900, 1981, no. 160 Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art (on extended loan until 2017) Werner Hofmann, Modern Painting in Austria, Vienna, 1965, illustrated pl. 30 Otto Kallir, Egon Schiele, Oeuvre Catalogue of Paintings, New York, 1966, no. 92, illustrated p. 191 Rudolf Leopold, Egon Schiele, Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings, London, 1972, no. 130 & pl. 19, illustrated pp. 59 & 543 Alessandra Comini, Egon Schiele, New York, 1976, illustrated pl. 52a Janet Hobhouse, The Bride Stripped Bare, The Artist and the Female Nude in the Twentieth Century, New York, 1980, no. 41, illustrated p. 55 Frank Whitford, Egon Schiele, New York, 1981, illustrated pl. 32 Gianfranco Malafarina, Tout l'oeuvre peint de Schiele, Paris, 1983, no. 126, illustrated p. 88 Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: The Complete Works, New York, 1990, no. 148, illustrated pp. 49 & 287 Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele, (exhibition catalogue), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis & San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, 1994, pl. 2, illustrated in color p. 51 Schiele (exhibition catalogue), Fondation Pierre Gianadda, Martigny, Switzerland, 1995, fig. 3, illustrated p. 22 Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele, The Complete Works, Expanded Edition, New York, 1998, no. 148, illustrated p. 287 Egon Schiele, Barcelona, 2008, n.n., illustrated in color p. 41 Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele's Women, Munich, 2012, no. 27, illustrated in color p. 45 Painted in 1909, Danaë is Egon Schiele\’\’\’\’s greatest early masterpiece. It contains the first flowering of Schiele's unique vision and voice. The jewel-like surface, the geometrical patterning and the broad expanses of color in the present work epitomize the lavishness and opulence of the Jugenstil decorative tradition. Here, Schiele focuses his great talent for figuration on Danaë\’\’\’\’s hand, shoulder blade and right arm as well as the supreme delicacy of the figure\’\’\’\’s facial features. His subtle usage of varied coloration in her flesh contrasts sharply with the gold, green and black shower of Zeus. The mythological roots of the subject matter in the present work serve as a perfect backdrop for the highly stylized execution and ambiguous space, while also allowing for a free use of the nude as subject matter. Greek mythology, adapted and recounted in Latin in the verses of Ovid\’\’\’\’s Metamorphoses, relates how the beautiful Danaë was locked away in a bronze tower by her father, King Acrisius of Argos. Disappointed that he and his wife Eurydice had not produced a male heir, Acrisius consulted an oracle, who informed him that his daughter\’\’\’\’s son would kill him. In order to keep her childless, the king banished Danaë to a tower, away from the reach of men. While no mortal could gain access to Danaë, her imprisonment was no obstacle to Zeus and his insatiable desire for young maidens. Transforming himself into a shower of golden rain, Zeus lay with Danaë and impregnated her, conceiving the boy who would become the hero Perseus, famed for killing the Medusa and for rescuing Andromeda. When Perseus was born, Acrisius threw both mother and son out to sea in a wooden chest, but Poseidon, the sea god, calmed the choppy waters and saved them. Later in life Perseus would indeed kill Acrisius, thereby affirming the inescapability of fate. A theme found equally in Greek vase painting, monumental canvases of the Old Masters from Gentileschi to Titian and the stunning marble carving of Auguste Rodin in the late nineteenth-century, the legends of Zeus and his many mortal conquests provided ripe subject matter for the nude in art. Danaë was created when Schiele was only nineteen years old. While he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna in 1906, his stay would be relatively short lived. Rebelling against the Ringstrasse Style of his instructors, and with several of his works chosen for public exhibition (prohibited to students at the Academy of Fine Arts) by Gustav Klimt, Schiele broke with his teachers and established the Neuekunstgruppe (New Art Group) with other young visual and performing artists. His rebellion echoed that of the initial formation of the Viennese Secession in 1897 which in turn had gone through its own internal schism in 1905. Klimt, at this time the most famous visual artist in Vienna, left and formed the \“Klimtgruppe.\” It was in this atmosphere, bubbling with tensions and disagreements within and amongst the traditional and avant garde artists groups, that the teenage Egon Schiele came of age. Jugendstil had swept Austria at the end of the nineteenth century. This \“new style\” believed in the full integration of the design of quotidian objects, interior decoration and architecture. Jugenstil\’\’\’\’s popularity and success in Vienna was closely tied to that of the Viennese Secession and their publication Ver Sacrum. While the art nouveau permeated Paris in much the same manner, the physical shape of imagery presented quite differently: \“Art Nouveau came to Austria through its German variant, Jugendstil, with an important difference: whereas in France decorative forms had been given botanical or anthropomorphic features, the Viennese endowed anthropomorphic or botanical forms (that is, representational subject matter) with a decorative geometricity. As a result, a stylized linearity became pervasive in the graphic arts, tempering Klimt\’\’\’\’s painterly impulses and, eventually, contributing to Schiele\’\’\’\’s precision draftsmanship\” (J. Kallir, op. cit. 1998, p. 23). There is some disagreement as to when Schiele and Klimt first met, although many sources believe this occurred in 1907. Whether or not Schiele actually met the older artist at this time is unknown, but Klimt\’\’\’\’s work could be seen at the showroom of the Wiener Werkstätte and in 1908 no less than sixteen paintings by Klimt were on display at the Kunstschau in Vienna. Magdalena Dabrowski closely examined Schiele\’\’\’\’s fascination with the established master of this time: \“Schiele\’\’\’\’s interest in Klimt was more complex than merely wanting to absorb his artistic style, especially during the years 1907-09. For Schiele, Klimt, who was twenty-eight years his senior, represented an older statesman, the dean of progressive art, and was the quintessential example of a successful artist…. [Klimt] early on recognized Schiele\’\’\’\’s talent. Klimt occasionally bought Schiele\’\’\’\’s drawings, provided models and patrons, and arranged for a temporary job with the Wiener Werkstätte when Schiele was financially strapped. During the early period of 1907-09, many of Schiele\’\’\’\’s works were compositionally and stylistically modeled on those by Klimt\” (M. Dabrowski & R. Leopold, Egon Schiele, The Leopold Collection, Vienna (exhibition catalogue), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1997-98, p. 11). During this crucial period of development, Schiele\’\’\’\’s work evolved both technically and stylistically. He abandoned the small cardboard supports that he had hitherto utilized and turned to larger canvases on which he could paint more ambitious compositions. He moved away from the painterly style that had characterized his work before 1908 to a bolder, flatter manner which showed his strong indebtedness to the Jugenstil mode of Klimt. Jane Kallir has characterized the development of Schiele's style, writing: \“Taking one step further Klimt\’\’\’\’s practice of contrasting a realistically three-dimensional figure with a flat decorative surround, Schiele in his recent works abstracted the figure to allow it to merge with the plane…. His application of pigment, previously dense and stubby in the Impressionist manner, gradually became broader and smoother. By 1909, two-dimensional tonal consideration had all but obliterated the tactile presence of the brushstroke\” (J. Kallir, op. cit., 1990, p. 40). One of the numerous canvases which Klimt had exhibited in 1908 at the Kunstchau, Klimt\’\’\’\’s version of Danaë must have proved influential to Schiele when he created the present work. Klimt\’\’\’\’s oil would be the last in his oeuvre to take on a subject from mythology, while the present work would be Schiele\’\’\’\’s first to do the same. The voluptuousness of Klimt\’\’\’\’s figure and the use of transparent drapery to partially conceal her stand in sharp contrast to the flatter planes and even more ambiguous space found in Schiele\’\’\’\’s work. Parallels have been drawn between Klimt\’\’\’\’s imagery and that of Frederic Leighton in his 1895 oil Flaming June in both the use of transparent drapery and the semi-fetal posture of the female figure. Interestingly the use of red hair, so favored by the Pre-Raphaelites, features in both Klimt and Schiele\’\’\’\’s canvases respectively. Jane Kallir has described the differences between Schiele and Klimt\’\’\’\’s Danaë canvases stating \“Klimt\’\’\’\’s interpretation of the myth—in which a swooning Danae lies coiled within a protective cocoon—was first exhibited at the Vienna \‘Kunstschau\’\’\’\’ in 1908…. Schiele\’\’\’\’s Danae differs noticeably from that of the older master.... The golden torrent, which in Klimt\’\’\’\’s painting caresses Danae\’\’\’\’s loins, cascades over her head in Schiele\’\’\’\’s version, so that the nude appears to be bathing, not copulating. Moreover, where Klimt\’\’\’\’s Danae is a rotund and sensual creature, Schiele\’\’\’\’s is as flat and stylized as her decorative surroundings…. The excessively simplified outlines of Schiele\’\’\’\’s Danae are typical of his contemporaneous drawings and watercolors and constitute an important weigh station in his development…. The extreme stylization of Schiele\’\’\’\’s work is suggestive of Jugenstil graphic design, though the artist was no more interested in frivolous decoration than he was in rote representationalism. His goal was rather to strip drawing both of artifice and academic pretension, to pare line down to its barest essentials\” (J. Kallir, op. cit., 1994, p. 50). Soon after the completion of Danaë, Schiele would create a series of nudes in radical colors on completely abstracted backgrounds. His drawings, which had previously explored the nude in a primarily academic way, would give over to intensive study of nude figures in expressive postures and sometimes, for the time, in shocking detail. \“Schiele\’\’\’\’s treatment of the nude, during this period [1909-10] and later, is certainly one of the most remarkable aspects of his oeuvre. Absent any sense of bourgeois moral reticence, he remains one of the few artists ever to confront sexuality directly, without the aesthetic distancing common in the work of older males such as Klimt\” (Schiele, op. cit. p. 20). Danaë was painted at a moment in Schiele\’\’\’\’s development after the precocious brilliance that had characterized his work until this time had begun to mature, resulting in paintings and drawings of a highly idiosyncratic nature. This work, the first oil painting of a nude woman Schiele created, signaled the revolutionary nature that his art would take over the next decade, until his untimely death. Other artists would face strong public criticism for the painted nude. Modigliani's nude works, now recognized as among the strongest of his production, faced protests when they were exhibited in the window of the Parisian Galerie Berthe Weill in 1917, without the trappings of a mythological subject matter to make them palatable to the public. Lucian Freud, the grandson of the famed Sigmund Freud whose influence on Fin-de-Siècle Viennese thought and culture influenced the world of Klimt and Schiele, would spend the middle decades of the twentieth century taking up the mantle as the most recognized painter of the nude figure. 
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