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John Singer Sargent

United States (Firenze 1856 -  Londra 1925 ) Wikipedia® : John Singer Sargent
Sargent John Singer John Alfred Parsons Millet

Sotheby's /May 23, 2017
2,246,383.32 - 3,144,936.65
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
339

Some works of John Singer Sargent

Extracted between 339 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John Singer Sargent - Girl Reading By A Stream

John Singer Sargent - Girl Reading By A Stream

Original 1888
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Gross Price
Lot number: 69
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Description:
John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) Girl reading by a stream oil on canvas 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm.) Painted circa 1888. Sargent spent the summer or early autumn between 1885 and 1889 in the English countryside. He had come from Paris, where his precocious talent was the talk of the town, his portraits and genre pictures garnering critical acclaim at the Salon and at smaller exhibition venues. An apparently irresistible arc was interrupted by the succès de scandale of his portrait of a beautiful young socialite, Amélie Gautreau (Madame X, 1883-84, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York). Sargent was thrown off balance by all the brouhaha attending it and, partly in response to the persistent encouragement of the novelist Henry James (1843-1916), he decided to try his artistic fortunes in England. It was a period of transition for Sargent and, with few portrait commissions forthcoming, he embarked on a period of sustained experimentation with Impressionist concerns and practice. In the late summer and autumn of 1885 and 1886, he was in Broadway in the Cotswolds, painting a few portraits, some landscapes and flower studies, but engrossed by a major picture, a study of two little girls dressed in white, lighting Japanese lanterns in a garden at dusk (Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose, 1885-86, Tate Britain). The atmosphere in Broadway was liberating and creative, leading Henry James to declare that \‘[t]here is portraiture in the air and composition in the very accidents. Everything is a subject or an effect\’. Sargent was absorbed into a lively Anglo-American artistic community, which revolved around the American artist, Francis Davis Millet (1846-1912) and his beautiful wife, Lily. Visitors included Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912), Henry James (1843-1916) and Edmund Gosse (1849-1928), and music, theatre, games, tennis and parties filled the time that was not dedicated to painting or writing. There were excursions on the River Avon from Broadway, and it is possible that this study of a young girl reading by a river was painted around this time; but it is much more likely that it was done during subsequent summers, when Sargent was living and working in riverside locations, making experiments with the figure-in-a-landscape and the effects of sunlight and shade on water. Sargent\’s experiments in the mid to late 1880s reflect the Impressionist imperative to paint en plein-air, capturing fleeting light, using a highly-keyed palette and laying on pigment in visible, broken brushstrokes, the aesthetic most closely identified with Claude Monet. Sargent had probably known Monet since around 1876, but their relationship was at its closest in the mid 1880s, when Sargent represented the French master working en plein-air at Giverny in what has become an recognisable image . Sargent\’s three riverside summers began in July 1887 in the Thames Valley, where he spent the week of the Henley Regatta, painting from an improvised studio-boat. The musician George Henschel has left us a vibrant image of the artist at work: He had built himself a little floating studio on a punt on the river, where it was a delight to see him, a splendid specimen of manly physique, clad — it was an exceptionally hot and dry summer, I remember — in a white flannel shirt and trousers, a silk scarf around the waist, and a small straw hat with coloured ribbon on his large head, sketching away all day, and once in awhile skilfully manipulating the punt to some other coign of vantage\’. In using a studio-boat, Sargent was emulating Monet, who had painted from a bateau-atelier at Argenteuil and then at Vétheuil from around 1873 (see Édouard Manet\’s study of Monet painting in his studio boat of 1874, The Barge, Neue Pinakothek, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Munich, and Monet\’s own Le Bateau atelier, 1876, Barnes Foundation, Merion, Pennsylvania). This period marks the highpoint of Sargent\’s veneration of Monet. He visited him at Giverny at some point during the summer and purchased two works by him, Bennecourt and Vaques à la Manneporte (he would later acquire two more paintings by Monet). In early July 1888, Sargent rented Calcot Mill, a historic former watermill, on the Holy Brook, a channel of the River Kennet, near Reading. He had just returned from his first and dazzlingly successful professional visit to the United States, but his father was seriously ill and he assembled the family around him at Calcot. The watery environment, overhung with willows, resembled the River Epte at Giverny, and Monet was, very briefly, a visitor there. In a letter to the American financier and collector, Henry Marquand, written at the beginning of September of that year, Sargent complained about the weather disrupting his painting programme: \‘Very bad for one\’s work, if one goes in for out-of-doors things as I have\’. The following day, the young American artist, Dennis Miller Bunker (1861-1890), who had travelled to England to work alongside Sargent, contradicted the latter\’s view of his accomplishments. Bunker reported back to the patron and collector Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840-1924) in Boston: \‘Sargent fils is working away at all sorts of things and making experiments without number — he makes them look awfully well — the experiments I mean and is altogether a wonderful being — we are off on the river all day painting\’. Sargent\’s father died in April 1889, and Sargent rented a large house, Fladbury Rectory on the River Avon, at Pershore in Worcestershire, gathering his family and various friends together for the summer months and continuing to pursue his figurative river scenes. He had seen Monet in Paris at the Exposition Universelle in late Spring and invited him to Fladbury, but there is no indication that Monet accepted the invitation. Sargent was committed to working en plein-air, but he did not use the river settings of 1887-89 as an opportunity to paint modern life, one of the subjects at the heart of the Impressionist mission. There are none of the regattas, social scenes, railways, bridges and general river life depicted, variously, by Monet, Renoir, Sisley, Pissarro and Berthe Morisot. Sargent now painted principally from the position of the river bank, and his figurative river scenes hovered somewhere between reality and dream. His models either stood by the side of the water, their forms frequently dominating the composition, or they reclined languorously in punts. The atmosphere was one of poetic reverie, at a remove from contemporary, quotidian life. The present study is undated and the model unidentified. A young girl is represented in profile, seated cross-legged beside a stream, reading a book. Her dress is difficult to pin down, reading more as picturesque costume than as a contemporary garment. There is no horizon to provide context, the picture plane is tipped up so that the water provides the reflective background, and there is a sense created of an enclosed natural space. This is consistent with Sargent\’s figure studies of the period, which are usually placed against an aqueous, rather than an aerial, backdrop. The composition exhibits a technical affinity with a small study of Sargent\’s sister, Violet, standing on a river bank with a fishing rod in her hand, a preliminary study for Lady Fishing - Mrs Ormond (Tate Britain). The similarity of the broad treatment of the reflections in the water is particularly close. Girl Seated by a Stream is an important rediscovery and was in the collection of the artist\’s friends Wilfrid de Glehn (1870-1951) and his American wife, Jane, née Emmet (1873-1961), who became significant figures in Sargent\’s life after their marriage in 1904. They were both artists and, for the following decade, they accompanied Sargent on his painting expeditions to the Italian Alps, Florence, Rome, Frascati, Corfu, Granada and Lake Garda. Sargent and de Glehn often painted the same motif, seated side by side, and the couple were models in a number of Sargent\’s pictures. Jane was known for her portrait drawings in sanguine chalk and for her landscapes in oil. Wilfrid, who had studied with Jean-Paul Laurens in Paris and with G.P. Jacomb-Hood in London, painted portraits and subject pictures in a distinctly Sargentesque style. We are grateful to Elaine Kilmurray, Research Director, John Singer Sargent Catalogue Raisonné for her assistance in preparing this catalogue entry. The painting will be included in any published or online addenda to the John Singer Sargent Catalogue Raisonné.
John Singer Sargent - The Honorable Mrs. Reginald (daisy) Fellowes

John Singer Sargent - The Honorable Mrs. Reginald (daisy) Fellowes

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 188
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Property from a Private Southeast Collection John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) The Honorable Mrs. Reginald (Daisy) Fellowes signed 'John S. Sargent' (lower right) charcoal on paper laid down on board 24 3/8 in. x 18 5/8 in. (61.9 x 47.3 cm.) Provenance Mrs. Daisy Fellowes, the sitter. Private collection, by descent. Sotheby\’s, New York, 22 May 2008, lot 83, sold by the above. Acquired by the present owner from the above. Lot Notes Heiress to the Singer sewing machine empire on her mother\’s side, and a descendent of French aristocracy on her father\’s, Daisy Fellowes was a trendsetter from the 'Roaring Twenties' through the café-society of the 1930s. An integral part of Mayfair society during the interwar years, her social circle included royalty and moguls, who she entertained on her two yachts in the Mediterranean and at her beach house in Antibes. Known to change outfits multiple times when she hosted, Daisy arguably launched more fashions than any other woman in the world. She was renowned both for her fine clothing and jewels, which she acquired from the leading jewelers and couturiers of her time, including Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Elsa Schiaparelli and Chanel. Daisy married the Honorable Reginald Fellowes, a wealthy banker and cousin of Winston Churchill, after a brief marriage to the Prince de Broglie.
John Singer Sargent -  Light And Shade

John Singer Sargent - Light And Shade

Original 1883
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Gross Price
Lot number: 84
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Description:
John Singer Sargent, R.A. (Florence 1856-1925 London) Light and Shade signed with initials and dated 'J.S. 83' (lower left) charcoal, watermark 'Arches' 13 x 8 ¾ in. (33 x 22.3 cm.) Sargent travelled to Paris in the spring of 1874 to enter the studio of Carolus-Duran (1838-1917) and enrol at the École des Beaux-Arts. The École at that time was very much focussed on developing an understanding of the human form and in echoing the great works of the Old Masters. While there, Sargent studied in the life class of Adolphe Yvon, and judging by the model's academic pose, it was probably there that the present drawing was executed. In its bold contrasts of light and shade, this drawing demonstrates the influence of Carolus-Duran and his innovative use of tone, giving a sense of atmosphere and drama not usually associated with the academic nude. We are grateful to Richard Ormond for his help in preparing this catalogue entry.
John Singer Sargent - John Alfred Parsons Millet

John Singer Sargent - John Alfred Parsons Millet

Original
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Lot number: 32
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John Singer Sargent JOHN ALFRED PARSONS MILLET O\\\’Keeffe, Rockwell, Hartley and More Lead American Art Sale 1856 - 1925 signed John S. Sargent and dated 1892 (upper right); inscribed to my friend Mrs. Millet (upper center) oil on canvas 36 1/4 by 24 1/8 inches (92.1 by 61.3 cm) Lily Millet (the sitter's mother; gift from the artist) John Alfred Parsons Millet, 1932 (the sitter, by descent) Private collection, 1976 (by descent) Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1980 Exhibited London, Royal Academy, Exhibition of Works by the Late John S. Sargent, R.A., January-March 1926, no. 327, p. 49, illustrated p. 24 Boston, Massachusetts, Museum of Fine Arts, Sargent's Boston, January-February 1956, no. 27, pp. 68, 110 (as John A.P. Millet as a child) Washington, D.C., National Gallery of Art; San Francisco, California, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Detroit, Michigan, Detroit Institute of Arts, American Paintings from the Manoogian Collection, June 1989-May 1990, no. 47, p. 132, illustrated p. 133 Knoxville, Tennessee, Knoxville Museum of Art, American Grandeur: Masterpieces of the Masco and Manoogian Collections, February-July 1996 Hokkaido, Japan, Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art; Shiga, Japan, The Museum of Modern Art, Shiga; Akita, Japan, The Akita Museum of Modern Art; Tokuyama, Japan, Tokuyama City Museum of Art History, Sogo, Japan; Sogo Museum of Art, From the Hudson River School to Impressionism: American Paintings from the Manoogian Collection, July 1997-February 1998 Brooklyn, New York, Brooklyn Museum; Norfolk, Virginia, Chrysler Museum of Art; Portland, Oregon, Portland Art Museum, Great Expectations: John Singer Sargent Painting Children, October 2004-September 2005, pp. 30, 32, illustrated p. 14 (detail) and pl. 4, p. 31 Vero Beach, Florida, Vero Beach Museum of Art, The American Spirit: Selections from the Manoogian Collection, October 2016-January 2017 Literature William Howe Downes, John S. Sargent: His Life and Work, Boston, Massachusetts, 1926, p. 337 Evan Charteris, John Sargent, London, 1927, p. 264 Charles Merrill Mount, John Singer Sargent: A Biography, New York, 1955, no. 923, p. 434; 1957 ed., p. 342; 1969 ed., p. 446 Richard Ormond and Elaine Kilmurray, John Singer Sargent: Portraits of the 1890s, Complete Paintings, New Haven, Connecticut, 2002, vol. II, no. 283, pp. 60-61, 179, illustrated Catalogue Note John Singer Sargent came to know the Millet family at Broadway, in the Cotswolds of England, where he painted some of his most celebrated pictures, including Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885-86, Tate Britain).  Sargent first visited Broadway in the summer of 1885 with fellow artist Edwin Austin Abbey.  Abbey and Frank Millet, also an expatriate artist from Boston, had long been close friends, and were often surrounded by a creative coterie who appreciated their enduring charm and good humor.  Millet with his wife Lily presided over an informal artist\\\’s colony at Broadway, where painters, actors and literary figures came to visit them from London, first at Farnham House and later at Russell House. \\\“John Alfred Parsons Millet (1888-1976) was the youngest child of the American painter Frank Millet and his wife, Lily, fellow members of the Broadway colony and among the artist\\\’s closest friends\\\” writes Elaine Kilmurray. \\\“J.A.P. Millet was named after his two godfathers, Sargent and another painter friend, Alfred Parsons.  He was educated at Marlborough College, England, and at Harvard University, and began to practise medicine in 1914.  In the 1920s he turned to psychiatry and became a distinguished psychiatrist and psychoanalyst with a private practice in New York and positions with several universities and medical foundations.  He married, first, Alice Murrell, in 1913, and Carmen de Gonzalo Manice, in 1941. \\\“Soon after \\\‘Jack\\\’ Millet\\\’s birth Sargent made two drawings of his godson and continued to take an interest in him. The occasion for this oil is not recorded, but it may have been painted either at Russell House, Broadway, where the Millets continued to reside, or at Morgan Hall, Fairford, where Sargent shared a studio with Edwin Abbey. \\\“The composition is novel and daring. The four-year-old boy, with his Lord Fauntleroy curls and white nursery smock, is shown looking over the back of a sofa or couch.  The lower part of his body is hidden, but he appears to be kneeling on the seat.  Nearly half the space is occupied by fabric draped over the sofa, a richly figured dark red cloth of oriental design with a floral motif picked out, and finally a brown fur rug.  The corner of an upright desk or cabinet with what looks like a piece of decoration or sculpture on top is dimly visible on the left behind the little boy.  The soft lighting from below, throwing deep shadows, suggests lamplight and an evening scene\\\” (John Singer Sargent: Portraits of the 1890s, Complete Paintings, New Haven, Connecticut, 2002, vol. II, no. 283, pp. 60-61). 32 John Singer Sargent signed John S. Sargent and dated 1892 (upper right); inscribed to my friend Mrs. Millet (upper center) oil on canvas 36 1/4 by 24 1/8 inches (92.1 by 61.3 cm) Please contact the American Art department for this condition report: (212) 606 7280 or americanart@sothebys.com In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.
John Singer Sargent - Fortress, Road And Rocks

John Singer Sargent - Fortress, Road And Rocks

Original
Estimate:

Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 133
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) Fortress, Road and Rocks watercolor, gouache and charcoal on paper laid down on board 11 ¾ x 17 ¾ in. (29.8 x 45.1 cm.) Executed circa 1905-06. Lot Notes According to Richard Ormond and Elaine Kilmurray, "The hot tones of this parched landscape suggest that it may have been painted on [John Singer] Sargent's visit to the Near East in 1905-06. However...the location may be elsewhere in the Mediterranean region." (John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1900-1907, vol. VII, New Haven, Connecticut, 2012, p. 63) The work was gifted by Sargent's sisters to Sir Alec Martin of Christie's, London, to thank him for his assistance with the Sargent estate auction successfully held in those salerooms in 1925. Provenance: The artist. Emily and Violet Sargent, sisters of the above. Sir Alec Martin, London, gift from the above, circa 1925. Mary Martin (Lady Flett), daughter of the above, 1971. By descent to the present owner. Literature: R. Ormand, E. Kilmurray, John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1900-1907, vol. VII, New Haven, Connecticut, 2012, pp. 55, 63, 335, no. 1195, illustrated.
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