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Peter Paul Rubens

Germany (Siegen 1577Antwerp 1640 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Peter Paul Rubens
RUBENS Peter Paul Angelica And The Hermit

Lempertz /May 16, 2015
75,000.00 - 100,000.00
186,000.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Sir Peter Paul Rubens

Rubens

Rubens Petr Pavel

 

Artworks in Arcadja
1801

Some works of Peter Paul Rubens

Extracted between 1,801 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Peter Paul Rubens - Venus Supplicating Jupiter

Peter Paul Rubens - Venus Supplicating Jupiter

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Lot number: 18
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Lot Description Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Siegen, Westphalia 1577-1640 Antwerp) Venus supplicating Jupiter oil on oak panel, unframed 20 x 14 ¾ in. (50.8 x 37.5 cm.) Provenance Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R.A. (1723-1792);his sale (†), Christie’’’’s, London, 11-14 March 1795 [=2nd day], lot 106, as ‘Thetis supplicating Jupiter’’’’ (25 gns. to the following), James Townley Esq; his sale (†), Foster, Ramsgate, 22-23 August 1830 [=2nd day], lot 139(52 gns. to Farrer). John Bligh, 4th Earl of Darnley (1767-1831), Cobham Hall, by 1830, and by descent in the collection of the Earls of Darnley to Ivo Bligh, 8th Earl of Darnley (1859-1927), from whom acquired by the following Otto Gutekunst (1865-1947), and by inheritance to his wife Lena, from whom acquired in 1947 by the following, with Colnaghi, London. Sir Alfred Lane Beit, 2nd Bt. (1903-1994), Russborough, Co. Wicklow, Ireland. Saleroom Notice This Lot is Withdrawn. Pre-Lot Text Property from the Alfred Beit Foundation (Lots 18-23) The Beit Collection A Foreword by Francis Russell Few collections are as revealing of their times or the taste and perception of their owners as that of the Beit family. Alfred Beit Alfred Beit (1853-1906), the second child of Siegfried Beit, a prosperous silk merchant of Jewish extraction but Lutheran persuasion, was born in Hamburg. Shy, indeed diffident in social matters, he was a man of exceptional practical ability, with the instinctive interest in the arts and sense of charitable duty so characteristic of his race. A generation later Aby Warburg left the at times stultifying world of the Jewish elite at Hamburg and found intellectual stimulus in Italy. For Beit the journey was longer. His flair for the diamond business first took him to Kimberley in 1875 at precisely the time that the natural resources of South Africa, then divided between English and Boer rule, were discovered. Many entrepreneurs and financiers sought a share in the development of the nascent, but soon highly profitable, gold and diamond mining industries. But none had so acute an understanding of the possibilities of these as Beit. In 1879 he met Cecil Rhodes, the architect of the future South Africa: he was to become his close confidant and most responsible financial advisor. Beit was already an associate of his compatriot Julius Wernher, and in 1884 both were partners in J. Porges & Co. (from 1890 Wernher, Beit & Co.): many of the other ‘randlords’’’’ came to be associated with him, and it was characteristic of the man that when his unscrupulous competitor J. C. Robinson was in severe financial difficulties, it was Beit who bailed him out. Rhodes, who died in 1902, chose Beit as his executor: his substantial benefaction to Oxford University was to be more than matched by the latter’’’’s bequest of £1,200,000 to a trust to bring a proper transport system to Rhodesia, and a further £800,000 for other charitable causes. As Geoffrey Wheatcroft demonstrates, Alfred Beit was ‘the one great financial mind of the mining business’’’’. His pre-eminence among the entrepreneurs who created the mining industry in South Africa was expressed by the shareholding statistics recorded in an article in Mining World of 1895: his holdings were computed at ten million pounds, Wernher’’’’s at seven, while Max Michaelis was stated to have six million, Lionel Phillips five and the controversial Barney Barnato four. All marked their success by securing mansions in London; and, with the apparent exception of Barnato who left this civilised activity to his Joel nephews and heirs, they were – or were to become – picture collectors, as did Robinson and two lesser magnates in the same business, George Farrar and Bernard Eckstein. Beit began to collect in about 1888, the year in which he decided to settle permanently in England. Like Wernher he came to draw upon the advice of the outstanding connoisseur of the age, Wilhelm von Bode (1845-1929), Director of the Kaiser Friedrich Museum at Berlin from 1890, and Director General from 1905 until 1920. Beit’’’’s tastes in some areas, notably Dutch and British painting, paralleled those of Wernher; while he and Michaelis, apparently at the same time, both seem to have bought Venetian views pruned from the series of Marieschis at Castle Howard. What distinguished Beit’’’’ s collecting from that of his fellow South African millionaires – and also from that of their rivals the brewers Edward Guinness and Michael Bass – was above all its discipline, paralleled by that of his business life, and its restraint. For as Bode implies in the introduction to his catalogue of the collection issued in 1904, Beit never lost sight of the context in which his collection would be displayed. In 1880 Beit took ‘a small apartment’’’’ in Prince’’’’s Chambers off Pall Mall, near Christie’’’’s and its ailing rival, Robinson’’’’s, as well as many prominent picture dealers. His first acquisitions were made for Prince’’’’s Chambers; and it was in the building, and as Bode recalled ‘on the whole rather simple’’’’ arrangement, of his Hamburg house, built in about 1890, that Beit gained the experience that ‘stood him in good stead’’’’ when he employed Eustace Balfour (nephew of one Prime Minister, Lord Salisbury and youngest brother of his successor, Arthur Balfour) and his associate Thackeray Turner to rebuild Aldford House, No. 26 Park Lane in 1894-7. This eclectic mansion Bode considered ‘artistically speaking, perfect, both in respect of harmony and comfort’’’’. Significantly two of the upper rooms ‘both in shape and arrangement’’’’ were ‘exactly similar’’’’ to those at Prince’’’’s Chambers. It was evidently in these upstairs rooms, ‘furnished in modern style’’’’, that Beit’’’’s early purchases were placed, predominantly Dutch and Flemish pictures of relatively small size: the ground floor was ‘arranged’’’’ in the French eighteenth-century style. Even here there was a certain reticence, with a single cinquecento portrait in the Hall and the six Murillos of episodes from the Parable of the Prodigal Son in the Library. But the building itself, which Bode considered to be in the French Renaissance taste but which a contemporary critic thought to look ‘so much like what it is – the African lodge transplanted’’’’ to Mayfair, was less restrained. But nonetheless this was much less ostentatious than that of his erstwhile rival Robinson, who acquired nearby Dudley House, ironically the source of the Murillos, and filled this with plutocratic energy. The tone of Bode’’’’s 1904 catalogue implies his respect for Beit as a collector: ‘He has not allowed himself to be carried away by the pleasure of the pursuit’’’’; ‘he has been neither falsely parsimonious, nor has he thrown money away recklessly; but he has always made his selections with calmness and deliberation and in doing so has ever listened to good advice.’’’’ The good advice was of course that of Bode himself. The small Lady at a Piano by Vermeer, an artist whose genius had only recently been recognised, was an early acquisition: and fine examples of many of the most admired Dutch masters of the seventeenth century followed. By 1904 Beit had acquired a constellation of distinguished pictures: three Rembrandts; celebrated masterpieces by Ruisdael and Hobbema of which the latter also came from Dudley House; the two incomparable Metsus (figs. 1 and 2); a beautiful small roundel by Hals; and Adriaen van Ostade’’’’s Adoration of the Shepherds, a touching religious statement in genre dress (lot 20 in this sale). As Bode notes, Beit had ‘a special predilection’’’’ for the work of van Goyen, who was represented at Park Lane by four works, two on panel. Beit’’’’s Dutch works were complemented by an outstanding Teniers, Before the Inn, which like the great Ruisdael of Bentheim Castle had been in the collection of John Walter, proprietor of The Times, at Bearwood. The highlight of the collection, Vermeer’’’’s A Lady Writing a Letter, with her Maid (fig. 3), would seem to have been a late acquisition, as this is not recorded in the 1904 catalogue. The Dutch painters meant much to Beit, but his collection was of wider range. The presence in Park Lane of three canvases by Guardi suggests an interest in vedute. Beit was also seriously interested in English portraits, as the meticulously controlled reduced version of Gainsborough’’’’s Giovanna Baccelli acquired in 1896 attests. He left one picture each to the National Gallery and the Kaiser Friedrich Museum and the selection is revealing of his taste: both were by Reynolds. Despite the strong hint of the Arts and Crafts movement in its design, the Park Lane house was something of a social statement. Tewin Water in Hertfordshire, which Beit acquired in 1900, by contrast was a rather restrained early nineteenth-century house, with interiors in the neo-renaissance manner created for the previous owner. These were ideally suited to display the exceptional collection of Italian bronzes which Beit began to acquire in 1891 and on which Bode was the recognised authority. A handful of early pictures were chosen expressly for the house. Sir Otto Beit Alfred Beit never married, although may have had a child by a mistress in South Africa. On his death in 1906, his heir was his brother, Otto (1865-1930), who had settled in London in 1888, was knighted in 1920 and elevated as a baronet in 1924. Otto Beit, who in 1897 married Lilian, daughter of Thomas Love Carter of New Orleans, already owned a substantial London house, No. 49 Belgrave Square, previously leased by the Duke of Richmond. Devoted to his brother and to his memory, he shared his artistic interests and, significantly, asked Bode to prepare a revised edition of his catalogue of the collection in 1913. The Dutch pictures from Park Lane were concentrated in a single top-lit room at Belgrave Square: Italian views, including the early Bellottos of Florence which Otto Beit added to the collection, were hung together in a drawing room, while the remarkable Goya of Doña Antonia de Zárate y Valdez (fig. 4) was placed with English and French portraits in the Boudoir. His own additions to the collection also included a notable early Velázquez, purchased from Sir Hugh Lane, who had dealings with several other South African collectors. Sir Otto was a well-known figure in the art world and was generous to such institutions as the Royal Academy, lending no fewer than ten pictures to the major Dutch exhibition of 1928-9. He continued to buy and sell pictures, printing supplements which he despatched at intervals to those who owned copies of the lavish, privately printed catalogue of his collection. An addendum, of which the London Library received its copy on 25 August 1927, recorded that he had sold portraits by Tintoretto, Verspronck and van den Tempel, and added pictures by Cuyp, Signorelli, Raffaellino del Garbo and Rubens, amongst others. A further addendum of 9 November 1929 added a Wheatley. Sir Otto’’’’s final acquisition was the Rubens Head of a bearded man (addendum of 22 November 1930; lot 21 in this sale). Sir Alfred Beit and Russborough On Sir Otto’’’’s death in 1930 the inheritance was divided. The pictures in Belgrave Square, the stars of the collection, passed to his younger but only surviving son, Alfred (1903-1994), who succeeded as 2nd baronet. His widow continued to live at Tewin. This would be left to their daughter, Angela, Mrs. Arthur Bull. Much of the collection in the house passed to her and to her sister Lilian Muriel, Lady Munro. Sir Alfred, appropriately named after the uncle so many of whose greatest treasures passed to him, was himself a deeply cultivated man. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, at a time when in certain circles it was no advantage to be either half German or partly Jewish, and a Member of Parliament in the Conservative interest for St. Pancras from 1931 until 1945, he inherited a strong sense of public responsibility. He was as keenly responsive to the visual arts as his uncle, and no doubt more deeply knowledgeable. He had an innate love of music, and he was exceptionally well-travelled. Travel, not least to see buildings and works of art, was a life-long recreation, and one he shared with Clementine Mitford, whom he married in 1939. Alfred was a consistent Tory: Clementine a committed adherent of the Labour Party. In the post-war years they were largely based in South Africa, where Alfred had an enduring commitment to the work of the Beit Trust. But Clementine’’’’s mounting dislike of the apartheid system meant that life there became intolerable to her. It was this that lay behind Alfred’’’’s decision to settle at Russborough, the most magical of all the great Georgian houses of Ireland, in 1952. Meticulously restored, this made an unforgettable impression when I first saw it on a New Year’’’’s morning nearly forty years ago, as the low sun reflected by fresh snow made the stone seem to ignite. Russborough was very much a joint undertaking. Alfred with his fastidious eye appreciated the distinction of both the house and his collection; while Clementine, who as a child had in her mother’’’’s absence in the Sudan shuttled in the school holidays between the houses of her maternal aunts, Cortachy and Hatfield, could for the first time consider a great house her own. But much as they both loved Russborough and their life in Ireland, their many friends there and what became annual expeditions to the Wexford Festival, they continued to spend generous periods in their London house, No. 2, the Little Boltons. Significantly much of Alfred’’’’s personal library was kept there, and they entertained a yet wider circle of friends than was possible in Ireland. They continued to visit South Africa regularly. And even when Alfred was frail, travelling remained important to him, as he never lost his love of sightseeing. Russborough was a more than worthy home for the Beit collection. The stars of the collection were placed in the Saloon room. Their impact was impressive, although some of the pictures cannot have been as readily studied as these had been in his father’’’’s top-lit picture room at Belgrave Square, and others seemed slightly too small for their new setting. The great majority of the original Russborough pictures had passed with the Milltown bequest to the National Gallery of Ireland, so it gave Alfred enormous satisfaction to be able to recover the set of oval Vernets painted for the Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown, builder of the house, and return these to their original positions in the Drawing Room. He also recognised that the house needed pictures of appropriate scale, buying an exceptional Oudry in 1961. The Beits gave much thought to the future of Russborough. Successive robberies, in 1974 and 1986, showed how difficult it was to provide adequate security for immensely valuable works in an isolated house, and demonstrated the personal courage and sangfroid of both Alfred and Clementine. Despite their complete faith in the Garda, the robberies and the resulting publicity took their toll, and were inevitably factors in the characteristically generous decision to present many of the most celebrated pictures to the National Gallery of Ireland. The donation transformed that collection, and more than justified the grant of Honorary Citizenship by which both the Beits set much store. It has also ensured that the disciplined connoisseurship of the elder Alfred Beit will never be forgotten. The gift of Russborough to the Alfred Beit Foundation in a parallel way has both secured the survival of one of the most perfect buildings of eighteenth-century Europe and will serve as an enduring memorial as much to the taste and discernment of Sir Alfred and Lady Beit as to the perceptive generosity that was so essential an element of their characters. Those who knew them will be aware that both Alfred and Clementine understood that the world does not stand still. They would both have regarded the retention of some of the smaller pictures in the collection as being far less significant than the preservation of the great house that meant so much to them, and to which they considered themselves fortunate to have been able to give a new and enduring life. Literature J. Smith, A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch, Flemish, and French Painters, etc., London, 1830, II, p. 199, no. 721, as ‘Thetis supplicating Jupiter on behalf of her son Achilles’’’’, and p. 259, no. 878, as ‘Jupiter committing to Woman the Government of the Universe... A free spirited sketch.’’’’ G.F. Waagen, Treasures of Art in Great Britain, London, 1854, III, p. 24, no. 5, as ‘Jupiter giving up the world to the domination of Love’’’’, ‘A very spirited sketch’’’’. F.G. Stephens, ‘On the pictures at Cobham Hall’’’’, Archeologia Cantaiana, 11, 1877, p. 165. F. Göler von Ravensburg, Rubens und die Antike, Jena, 1882, pp. 165 and 219, no. 34, as ‘Jupiter giving up the world to the domination of Love.’’’’ M. Rooses, L’’’’Oeuvre de Pierre-Paul Rubens, Antwerp, 1890, III, p. 167, as ‘Thetis supplicating Jupiter.’’’’ E. Dillon, Rubens, London, 1909, p. 232, as ‘Jupiter, Venus, and Cupid.’’’’ ‘Sir Joshua Reynolds’’’’ Collection of Pictures – II’’’’, The Burlington Magazine, LXXXVII, 1945, p. 217, no. 106 as ‘Thetis supplicating Jupiter.’’’’ D. Bax, Hollandse en Vlaamse Schilderkunst in Zuid-Afrika, Amsterdam, 1952, pp. 117 and 118, fig. 68, as ‘Venus supplicating Jupiter.’’’’ M. Jaffé, ‘Review of Paintings from Irish Collections’’’’, The Burlington Magazine, XCIX, 1957, p. 276, fig. 38, as ‘Venus supplicating Jupiter.’’’’ F. Watson, ‘The Collections of Sir Alfred Beit: 1’’’’, The Connoisseur, CXLV, April 1960, p. 158, as ‘Venus supplicating Jupiter.’’’’ E. Croft-Murray, Decorative Painting in England, 1537-1837, London, 1962, I, pp. 38 and 208, under Queen’’’’s House, Greenwich, as ‘Venus supplicating Jupiter’’’’. J. Held, The oil sketches of Peter Paul Rubens. A critical catalogue, Princeton, 1980, I, pp. 335-6, no. 247, as ‘Jupiter reassuring Venus’’’’; II, pl. 265. J. Garff and E. de la Fuente Pedersen, Rubens Cantoor: The Drawings of Willem Panneels. A critical catalogue, Copenhagen, 1988, I, no. 125 and II, pl. 127. M. Jaffé, Rubens, Milan, 1989, p. 263, no. 658, illustrated, as ‘Jupiter reassuring Venus.’’’’ Exhibited Cape Town, National Gallery of South Africa, Old Master Paintings from the Beit Collection, 1949-50, no. 23. Dublin, Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Paintings from Irish Collections, May-August 1957, no. 53. View Lot Notes >
Peter Paul Rubens - Figure Studies

Peter Paul Rubens - Figure Studies

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Lot number: 36
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Lot Description Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Siegen 1577-1640 Antwerp) Figure studies (recto and verso) with inscription 'Rubens' (verso) (by Sir Joshua Reynolds according to Jaffé, 1996, p. 459) pen and brown ink, brown and grey wash on buff paper (recto); red and black chalk, brown ink, brown wash heightened with white (verso) 9 3/8 x 15 ½ in. (23.7 x 39.3 cm.) Provenance Sir Joshua Reynolds (L. 2364). with Schaeffer Galleries, New York, 1953 (as van Dyck). Michael Jaffé, and by descent. Literature M. Jaffé, 'Rubens as a Draughtsman: Some Fresh Examples', in Essays in Northern European Art: Presented to Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann on his sixtieth birthday, Groningen, 1983, pp. 117-8, figs. 1-2, note 1. M. Jaffé, Catalogo completo: Rubens, Milan, 1989, p. 170, under no. 116. M. Jaffé, 'Seven unpublished drawings by Rubens', in Ars naturam adiuvans: Festschrift für Matthias Winner, Mainz am Rhein, 1996, pp. 457, 459, figs. 4-5. View Lot Notes >
Peter Paul Rubens - Meleager And Atalanta

Peter Paul Rubens - Meleager And Atalanta

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Lot number: 44
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Description: AFTER SIR PETER PAUL RUBENS (flemish 1577-1640)/span MELEAGER AND ATALANTA Oil on canvas 55 x 42 in. (139.7 x 106.7cm) provenance: /spanPrivate Collection, New Jersey. note:/span The present painting is after the original by Rubens in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich.
Peter Paul Rubens - Angelica And The Hermit

Peter Paul Rubens - Angelica And The Hermit

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Lot number: 1043
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Lot 1043: Peter Paul Rubens, studio of, Angelica and the Hermit Description: Certificate Prof. Dr. Hans Gerhard Evers, Darmstadt, 12.7.1971 (attributed to Peter Paul Rubens). This motif of the hermit and the sleeping Angelica is a rarely depicted scene from Ariost's “Orlando Furioso” and is a workshop replica of a composition which Rubens painted between 1626 and 1628. Scholars agree that the painting is a replica made in Ruben's workshop, and Fiona Healey (exhib. cat. Antwerp 2004, op. cit.) even postulates this to be the work known to be in the master's collection upon his death in 1640 which was purchased by his son Nicolaas Rubens during the auction of his father's collection. The work depicts a scene from the eighth canto of Aristo's epic poem (canto VIII, 29-50). The hermit, who is hopelessly in love with the beautiful Chinese princess Angelica from the court of Charlemagne, follows her and enchants her horse so that it carries her to a deserted island. Here the hermit wishes to win the young girl's heart by playing the part of her rescuer. Once on the island, the hermit comforts Angelica, but she rebukes him when his attentions become inappropriate, upon which he puts her to sleep with a magic potion. The hermit then attempts to ravish the defenceless princess, but is prevented by his failure to perform, a plot point which Ariost describes at length throughout several verses. The hermit eventually falls asleep beside Angelica. Rubens has depicted the moment in which the princess is put to sleep by the potion, allowing the hermit to approach and avail her of the white cloth that covers her body. Ariost describes how the hermit kisses her breast and mouth (“Or le bacia il bel petto, ora la bocca”). Rubens transformed Ariost's story into a finely painted work, contrasting the bright, warm tones of the female nude with the dark, pastose pigments of the hermit's skin - and this same quality is evident in the present copy. Two other versions of this composition are known to have been painted by Rubens himself. It is thought that the piece sent along with other works to the Duke of Buckingham George Villiers in England in 1626 was the prime version. The Buckingham version is probably identical to a work which was known to have been kept in the collection of Charles Emile Janssen in Brussels in 1931, the whereabouts of which is currently unknown. A version painted by Rubens himself which today hangs in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (inv. no. GG 692) displays a similar composition and dimensions to the present work. As previously mentioned, Fiona Healey has suggested that this work could be the piece purchased by Rubens' son Nicolaas upon the artist's death, as his collection is known to have included a work depicting the hermit and the sleeping Angelica. Peter Paul Rubens, studio of 45.7 x 63 cm Oil on panel
Peter Paul Rubens - Landscape With Pan And Syrinx

Peter Paul Rubens - Landscape With Pan And Syrinx

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Lot number: 30
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Sir Peter Paul Rubens Jan Breughel the Younger Siegen 1577 - 1640 Antwerp Antwerp 1601 - 1678 LANDSCAPE WITH PAN AND SYRINX the reverse of the panel bears the brand of the Antwerp panel-makers' guild and the maker's mark of Michiel Vriendt (MV in monogram) oil on panel 23 by 37 1/4 in.; 58.2 by 94.6 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report
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