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Martino Rota

Italy (1520 -  1583 ) Wikipedia® : Martino Rota
ROTA Martino The Last Judgment

Swann Galleries
Nov 1, 2018
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Artworks in Arcadja
17

Some works of Martino Rota

Extracted between 17 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Martino Rota - The Last Judgement

Martino Rota - The Last Judgement

Original 1569
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Gross Price
Lot number: 121
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Description:
MARTINO ROTA (CIRCA 1520-1583) AFTER MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI (1475-1564) The Last Judgement engraving, 1569, on laid paper, watermark Crescent with Star and Bend, probably an unrecorded proof impression of the second, final state, with rework on the boat at the lower edge, with narrow to thread margins; together with a copy of the same by Matthäus Greuter (1564 or 1566-1638), engraving, after 1569, on laid paper, without watermark, a good impression of the second state (of three), with narrow to thread margins; and two copies of the same by Léonard Gaultier (circa 1561 - circa 1630 or 1641), engraving, circa 1600, on laid paper, without watermark, good to very good impressions, with small to thread margins Plate 321 x 232, Sheet 323 x 235 (B. 28, unrecorded) Plate 309 x 231 mm., Sheet 312 x 232 mm. (H. 20, unrecorded) Plate 309 x 231 mm., Sheet 356 x 270 mm. (IFF 17/1) Plate 309 x 231 mm., Sheet 316 x 237 mm. (IFF 17/2) (4) Provenance Ernest-Théophile Devaulx, 1883 (1831-1901), Paris (Lugt 670). (on H. 20, unrecorded) Ulrich Ochsenbein (1811-1890) and Alfred Ochsenbein (1883-1919), Switzerland; then by descent.
Martino Rota - The Last Judgment

Martino Rota - The Last Judgment

Original 1550
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Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 61
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Description:
MARTINO ROTA (after Michelangelo) The Last Judgment. Engraving, circa 1550. 323x230 mm; 12 3/4x9 1/8 inches, thread margins. A very good, well-inked impression of this scarce engraving, with strong contrasts. This is among the earliest engravings of Michelangelo's (1475-1564) fresco on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel, which took 4 years for him to complete between 1536 and 1541. Bartsch 28.
Martino Rota - The Massacre Of The Innocents

Martino Rota - The Massacre Of The Innocents

Original
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Lot number: 103
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Description:
MARTINO ROTA
The Massacre of the Innocents.
Engraving, 1550s. 400x648 mm; 15 3/4x25 1/2 inches. With thread margins or trimmed on the plate mark. A very good, evenly-inked and well-printed impression of this large, scarce engraving, with strong contrasts and little to no sign of wear.
Born in Sebenico, Dalmatia, Rota (circa 1520-1583) worked as an engraver, primarily in Venice and Rome, where he produced prints after designs by Titian, Michelangelo and other Italian masters. His best known engravings reproduced Michelangelo's frescoes for the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican, Rome, soon after their completion (circa 1508-12 and 1536-41) and were the main source for decades disseminating Michelangelo's important works throughout Europe. Bartsch 1.
Martino Rota - Portrait Of Emperor Rudolf Ii

Martino Rota - Portrait Of Emperor Rudolf Ii

Original
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Lot number: 621
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Description:
Martino Rota (Sibenik 1520 – 1583 Vienna)
Portrait of Emperor Rudolf II, oil on canvas, 112 x 98.5 cm, framed

Provenance:
Private Collection, Northern Italy

The present, previously unpublished, portrait depicts Rudolf II Habsburg (1552-1612), Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bohemia, Hungary and Croatia and Archduke of Austria. His features are easily recognizable from other portraits of the ruler, according to Professor Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann. The hat on the table is one similar to those seen in other portraits and paintings, such as that by Lucas van Valckenborch of Emperor Rudolf II taking the Waters (Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum) He is wearing a cuirasse known as the Dreiprinzengarnitur which was parade or tournament armour and, together with his other attire, including lace collar and hose, was purely ceremonial. He is holding a baton, a sign of control or military command in his hand, but this is just a flattering accoutrement as Rudolf never personally led troops into war: one sees it in images such as an engraving by Adriaen de Vries after Sadeler.

This image shows the emperor at a relatively youthful age. It should be clearly datable before 1585, the year in which Rudolf received the Order of the Golden Fleece, which is absent in this painting. The absence of imperial or royal regalia may even suggest that it is a relatively early portrait, executed before Rudolf assumed the imperial dignity, but that remains speculative.

The question is if this portrait belongs to a series of the emperor and his brothers Ernst and Maximilian (III) executed in the late 1570\’\’\’\’ s or circa 1580 (see the discussion in T. DaCosta Kaufmann, The School of Prague, Chicago and London, 1988, pp. 226-7). These pictures are attributed to Martino Rota.
There exist versions of Ernst and Maximilian in three-quarter length and of Rudolf and Ernst in bust-length. Moreover, it is known that a portrait of Rudolf, now lost, once existed, as Rota was paid for delivering one to The Town Council of Louny in Bohemia. Given the absence of a three-quarter-length version of the portrait of the emperor, it is possible to suppose that the present painting might have been it, and that it accompanied the versions in similar format of the two other archdukes.

Several similarities between these works speak for this identification. The pictures share the three-quarter-length format. They all show the sitters wearing parade armour with ruffs at the collar and cuffs, carrying swords, with similarly slashed trousers. They all are standing beside a table on which a helmet or hat is placed. Rudolf does, however, face the opposite direction: this may because his superior status, as emperor, may be emphasized and may account for the presence of the baton. The substitution of hat for helmet seems hard to understand.

This portrait is, however, not a larger version of a bust in the Kunsthistorisches Museum (see op. cit. School of Prague cat. no. 17.1). The armour worn is different and, more importantly, the head is turned in the other direction. The moustache is also different, curling up at the sides. Rudolf seems slightly more corpulent in this painting. This may discount the hypothesis advanced originally by Günther Heinz that the series was related. Nevertheless, the increase in weight may also be a trait that speaks positively for the identification, as Ernst also seems similarly heavier in the three-length version.

DaCosta Kauffmann tentatively attributes the present composition to Martino Rota, and notes some differences in execution between the painting of Archduke Ernst, (formerly in New York, Hispanic Society) and that of the present portrait of Rudolf. These differences may be the result of condition or the disparities in the execution of the portrait of Ernst as well, or may indicate that the artist\’\’\’\’ workshop participated in this work, or indeed, as DaCosta Kaufmann has also hypothesized, that the workshop helped paint the entire series.

We are grateful to Dr. Christian Beaufort-Spontin for identifying the armour worn by the sitter in the present compositon as the Dreiprinzengarnitur. The armour is decorated with a characteristic interlaced pattern which was first depicted in 1574 in a print of Rudolf II by Martino Rota. There are other depictions of Rudolf and his brothers in this armour dating to this period Portrait of Archduke Ernst, (formerly New York, Hispanic Society of America); Portrait of Archduke Maximilian (Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum). It is possible that Rudolf, Ernst and Maximilian all wore the armour at the celebrations of Rudolf\’\’\’\’s coronation as King of Hungary in 1572, hence the term Dreiprinzengarnitur \“uniform of three princes\” (see B. and C. Thomas, Die sogenannte Dreiprinzengarnitur in Wien. Neue Erkenntnisse and Ergebnisse, in: Jahrbuch der kunsthistorischen Collectionen in Wien Vol. 79/1983, special edition 280)). Parts of the Dreiprinzengarnitur are currently held in the Arms and Armour collection in Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.

We are grateful to Professor Karl Vocelka for suggesting that the initials \‘AF\’\’\’\’ on the ring worn by the sitter in the painting may refer to Ferdinand I Habsburg and Anna Jagiello of Bohemia and Hungary., the grandparents of Rudolf. The presence of this family ring may be an allusion to Rudolf\’\’\’\’s coronation as King of Hungary for it was through Anne that the Hungarian and Bohemian territories became part of the family property, with Ferdinand becoming the first Habsburg King in these countries.

Rudolf was born in Vienna on 18th July 1552, the son of Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain. He spent his early years at the court of Emperor Ferdinand I and Maximilian II. He was enduringly influenced by the stimulating artistic atmosphere of the court. During the years 1563 to 1571 he lived at the sternly catholic court in Spain which was to have an enduring influence on his life. During his youth Rudolf was the embodiment of the ideal high nobility. He not only mastered the knightly skills of combat used at tournaments, but also enjoyed a wide-ranging humanist education. In 1571 Rudolf returned to Austria where his father prepared him for succession. He was crowned King of Hungary in Bratislava in 1572, and 1575 King of Bohemia. He was elected Holy Roman Emperor during the same year and crowned shortly afterwards.

In 1583 Rudolf transferred his residence to Prague where he entertained a large and representative royal household. He was increasingly accused of inaction, making no attempts to marry and secure an heir. Symptoms of a psychological illness became increasingly evident. This lead to conflict between the Habsburg brothers, with Matthias striving to succeed him. In 1605 the Archdukes agreed that Matthias should travel to Prague to negotiate with the Emperor. In 1606 the Archdukes declared the Emperor mentally insane and they established Matthias as head of the family and began to expel Rudolf. In 1611 Matthias was crowned King of Bohemia and Rudolf became an emperor without a realm. He died in Prague in 1612.

Rudolf II promoted the arts and artists in many ways. His art collection was the largest of its time and one of the most celebrated in history.

We are grateful to Professor Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann and Professor Enrique Valdivieso for independently confirming the identity of the sitter.

We are grateful to Prof. Eva-Bettina Krems for independently confirming the attribution, and the identity of the sitter.

We are grateful to Professor Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann for his assistance in the cataloguing of this lot.
Martino Rota - The Last Judgment

Martino Rota - The Last Judgment

Original 1550
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 427
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
MARTINO ROTA (after Michelangelo)
The Last Judgment
.

Engraving, circa 1550
.
323x230 mm; 12 3/4x9 1/8 inches
.
Ex-collection Richard Houlditch (Lugt 2214, lower right recto)
.
Trimmed on the plate mark, backed with thin laid paper
.
A very good, well-inked impression of this scarce engraving, with little to no signs of wear
.

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