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Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese

Italy (1610 -  1662 )
ROMANELLI IL VITERBESE Giovanni Francesco  'diversa Per Aequora'

Sotheby's
Jun 9, 2015
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Variants on Artist's name :

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli

 

Artworks in Arcadja
122

Some works of Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese

Extracted between 122 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese -  Allegory Of Fame

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - Allegory Of Fame

Original 1646
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Gross Price
Lot number: 72
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Description:
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli (Viterbo 1610–1662) Allegory of Fame, oil on canvas, 191.5 x 137 cm, framed Provenance: probably commissioned by Cardinal Jules Mazarin; sale, Christie\’s, Milan, 7 June 2006, lot 116; where acquired by the present owner Literature: S. Ferrari (ed.), Linguaggi e presenze nella pittura del Settecento a Torino, Busto Arsizio 2016, p. 12 and p. 13, fig. 1 Giovanni Francesco Romanelli executed this Allegory of Fame during his first Parisian sojourn between 1646 and 1648. It is very likely a commission connected with Cardinal Jules Mazarin, the prime minister of the regent, Anne of Austria who was the mother of Louis XIV, and a political ally of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, Romanelli\’s patron. Indeed, the painter had been called to Paris to decorate the illustrious prelate\’s city residence in the Hôtel De Chevry-Tubeuf, today a seat of the Bibliothèque National de France. The celebrative intent of the present work recalls the Allegory of Jules Mazarin engraved by François de Poilly after a design by Romanelli (Bibliothèque National, Paris), which also exalted the cardinal\’s political role, raising him to mythic status. The present painting represents a winged female figure, who turning her gaze to the heavens, raises a laurel crown in her left hand and holds a trumpet in her right. The subject is identifiable as \‘Fame\’ as described by Cesare Ripa in his Iconologia. On the right there is a cylindrical pedestal on which are sculpted a coat of arms with two eight pointed stars. Leaning against the pedestal is a baton of command, while placed on top of it are two coronets, a cardinal\’s hat and a cross of the Order of Malta, symbols of temporal power. The painter\’s rich palette is especially striking in its combination of the bright red of the female figure\’s drape, with the strong ochre yellow of her dress and the intense blue of the sky. The figure\’s pose recalls prototypes by Bernini, while her delicacy and sense of scale are reminiscent of Guido Reni: Romanelli achieved his most original pictorial language through the singular combination of baroque and classicizing traits. Stylistic comparisons can be made with the figures frescoed by the painter on the ceilings of Cardinal Mazarin\’s palace, which largely represent mythological scenes taken from the Metamorphosis of Ovid (see E. Oy-Marra, Zu den Fresken des Parnaß und des Parisurteils von Giovanni Francesco Romanelli in der Galerie Mazarin in Paris, in: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte, LVII, 1994, 2, pp. 170-200). After a brief formative period with Domenichino at Rome, Giovanni Francesco Romanelli was introduced into the studio of Pietro da Cortona with whom he collaborated on the decoration of Palazzo Barberini alle Quattro Fontane, an experience that marked the beginning of a long association between Romanelli and the family of Urban VIII. On his return to Italy following his first Parisian sojourn, Romanelli received numerous prestigious public and private commissions, before being called to France for a second time, this time at the behest of the queen mother, Anne of Austria, to decorate four rooms of her summer apartment in the Louvre. Specialist: Mark Mac Donnell
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese -  The Choice Of Hercules

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - The Choice Of Hercules

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 29
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Description:
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli (Viterbo c. 1610-1662) The Choice of Hercules signed 'I·F·ROMANELLVS / VITERB~ / F' (lower left) oil on canvas 30 ¼ x 39 ½ in. (76.8 x 100.4 cm.) Giovanni Francesco Romanelli moved to Rome at a young age. He is first recorded in the studio of Pietro da Cortona in 1631, assisting the master with one of his greatest commissions, the decoration of the Palazzo Barberini, a project that lasted seven years. Romanelli must have quickly distinguished himself, for by 1636 he was independently commissioned by Maffeo Barberini, Pope Urban VII, to paint a fresco for an overdoor in St. Peter’’’’’’’’s of St. Peter Healing the Sick (in situ). For the next decade, Romanelli enjoyed substantial Barberini patronage, executing frescoes, altarpieces, and tapestry cartoons for the Vatican and churches throughout Rome. In the 1640s, he collaborated with Gianlorenzo Bernini, then among the most important artists in Italy, painting chapel decorations according to Bernini's designs. After the death of Urban VIII, Romanelli found himself out of favor with the new pope, Innocent X, and left for Paris in 1646 at the invitation of Cardinal Jules Mazarin, chief adviser to Anne of Austria. The ceiling frescoes he executed there helped introduce the latest Italian artistic trends to France and would be considerably influential on the development of the Classical Baroque styles of Eustache Le Sueur and Charles Le Brun. Romanelli’’’’’’’’s mature work is characterized by elegant figures and graceful and harmonious compositions, which can be seen in decorations of the summer apartment of the Queen in the Palais du Louvre (1655), the high altarpiece of St. Lawrence for the cathedral of his native Viterbo, and the present work, which was likely painted either during Romanelli's first stay in France or just after his return to Rome. The story of Hercules at the cross-roads, also known as the Choice of Hercules, was invented by the Greek sophist Prodicus, a friend of Socrates and Plato. Prodicus’’’’’’’’s tale is recorded by Xenophon (Memorabilia 2.1:22 ff.), who tells that when Hercules was on the brink of adulthood, the demigod took it upon himself to decide whether he would henceforth take the path of virtue or vice. While he was pondering his future, two figures appeared before him. The first, a voluptuous woman wearing makeup and 'dressed so as to disclose all her charms', identified herself as Happiness, though conceded that her enemies call her Vice. She urged Hercules to take the easy road leading to a life full of pleasure and free from toil, war or worries. The second, a noble and modest woman, urged Hercules to choose the more difficult road, full of hard labor and struggle, but that would ultimately lead to great fame and triumph. Romanelli represents the moment in which the hero is about to make his decision, presenting the figures as if arranged on a frieze, with Virtue dressed in blue and yellow, her head adorned with a laurel wreath. Sporting flowing strawberry blond hair, Vice wears a scarlet tunic and gestures toward three nymphs, one who reclines, one who plays the tambourine (a tradition symbol of vice), and one who serves wine. The righteous path is signaled by the circular temple in the background, which in the 17th century would have been understood to represent the Temple of Vesta.
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese -  'diversa Per Aequora'

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - 'diversa Per Aequora'

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 158
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Description:
An Italian allegorical tapestry portiere, Rome, Barberini workshop, with the insignia of the Barberini family, probably from cartoons by Giovanni Francesco Romanelli, after an engraving by Agostino Veneziano, circa 1650-1660

with the impresa 'Diversa per aequora', within a cartouche with small putto on a little boat, within a floral surround with strapwork with laurel sprigs centred by the Barberini family insignia of the bee, all within a frame surround and an outer four-sided border with ribbon bound double scroll entwined with a laurel leaf trail with wreaths and interspersed with the bee motif, against a blue surround, with an outer terracotta selvedge
approximately 301cm high, 219cm wide; 9ft. 10in., 7ft. 2in.

Exhibited
Dipinti, sculture, arredi dai Palazzi di Roma, Exhibition, Palazzo Sacchetti, Rome, 15 May – 30 June 1991

Literature
Adam Bartsch, Le Peinture Graveur, XIV, Lipsia 1813, p.179,n.219., and p.188,n.234.
Pascal-François Bertrand, Les tapisseries des Barberini et la décortion d’’intérieur dans la Rome baroque’’, Turnhout, 2005, pp.55, 289, fig.43., for comprehensive discussion of the Barberini patronage and tapestry manufacture.
Thomas Campbell, Tapestry in the Baroque, Threads of Splendour, Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition, New York, October 17, 2007-January 6, 2008; and at the Palacio Real, Madrid, March 6-June 1, 2007, Yale University Press, 2002, James, G. Harper, Tapestry Production in Seventeenth-Century Rome: The Barberini Manufactory, pp.293-303.
Edited by Guy Delmarcel, Flemish Weavers Abroad: Emigration and the Founding of Manufactories in Europe, Proceedings of International Conference, Mechelen, 2
nd
-3
rd
October 2000, Leuven University Press, 2002, Lucia Meoni, Flemish Tapestry Weavers in Italy in the 17
th
and 18
th
centuries, pp.163-183, and pp.177-183, for discussion of the importance of the foundation of the tapestry works of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, and the tapestries woven.
Fausto Romano, Dipinti, sculture, arredi dai Palazzi di Roma, Exhibition Palazzo Sacchetti, 15 May – 30 June 1991, pp.211-212, fig.172, for entry for this tapestry.
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - Tullia On Her Chariot

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - Tullia On Her Chariot

Original
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Price:

Lot number: 96
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Description:
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli
(Viterbo 1610-1662) Tullia on her chariot, pen, brush and brown ink, over black chalk, brown wash, on laid paper, 25 x 19,3 cm, an old inscription "Petrus Beretinus alias Cortona fecit" on the reverse, browned, mounted, unframed, (Sch)

Provenance: collector\’\’\’\’s mark Jonathan Richardson Sr. (1665-1745, Lugt 2183); Thomas Hudson (1701-1779, Lugt 2432); Ch. Rogers (1711-1784, Lugt 624); anonymous collector\’\’\’\’ s mark crown in a circle; private collection, Italy. The attribution to Giovanni Francesco Romanelli was confirmed by Prof. Jonathan Bober, National Gallery of Art Washington, on basis of the original.
Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - An Angel Violinist Appearing To Saint Francis Of Assisi

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli Il Viterbese - An Angel Violinist Appearing To Saint Francis Of Assisi

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 51
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Description:
Lot Description

Giovanni Francesco Romanelli (Viterbo 1610-1662)
An angel violinist appearing to Saint Francis of Assisi
black chalk
6 x 6 3/8 in. (15 x 16.3 cm.)

Lot Condition Report
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Provenance

R. Houlditch (L.2214). Sir Joshua Reynolds (L.2364). Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 8 July 1975, lot 31. with Charles E. Slatkin Galleries, New York.

Literature

Catalogo Bolaffi, no. 8, Turin, 1977, p. 132. B. Kerber, 'Ergänzungen zu Romanelli', in Giessener Beiträge zur Kunstgeschichte, 1983, p. 49, fig. 30, p. 128, no. 105.
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