Diego Rivera

Mexico (Guanajuato 1886Città Del Messico 1957 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Diego Rivera
RIVERA Diego Self-portrait

Auctionata /Jan 22, 2015
8,901.42
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Artworks in Arcadja
622

Some works of Diego Rivera

Extracted between 622 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Diego Rivera - Fruits Of Labor

Diego Rivera - Fruits Of Labor

Original 1932
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Lot number: 446
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DIEGO RIVERA Fruits of Labor. Lithograph, 1932. 417x298 mm; 16 1/2x11 3/4 inches, full margins. Signed, dated and numbered 72/100 in pencil, lower margin (the edition numbers erased and rewritten). A superb impression of this very scarce, important lithograph. Diego Rivera (1886-1957), who helped establish the Mexico Mural Movement and was a leading artistic figure in Social Realism, was born in Guanajuato in North-Central Mexico. His well-to-do family encouraged his artistic avidity from a young age; his parents installed chalkboards and canvases around the house after coming home one afternoon to find the walls covered in their toddler's drawings. In 1897, Rivera began studying at the oldest art school in Latin America, the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City (now the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes). He remained until 1907 (three years before the start of the Mexican Revolution) at which point he left for Europe to continue his studies. Rivera spent the better part of the next 14 years abroad, mainly in Paris, where he was deeply involved in the thriving avant-garde art scene. Rivera was submerged in the artistic circle in Montparnasse and was friends with Amedeo Modigliani, who painted several portraits of him in 1914. Despite his absence from Mexico, Rivera intently followed the political situation at home. The Mexican Revolution officially ended in 1920, after a decade of bloodshed and political upheaval. The new government, led by Álvaro Obregón, decided to utilize art as a vehicle to unify society and promote their values of equality. Rivera was recruited for this effort; the Mexican government prompted him to first take a tour of Italy to study Renaissance frescoes (this classical influence is easily detected in his work) and then to return to Mexico as a muralist. The country's Minister of Education commissioned local artists, among them Rivera, to create murals around Mexico City to celebrate the lives of the working class and the indigenous people. Rivera embraced the projects and, as a result of them, quickly gained recognition and prominence as a leading muralist in Mexico. Rivera was simultaneously garnering the attention of the Soviet Union for his outspoken support of Communism. In 1928, while in Russia on an invitation from the government, Rivera met and befriended Alfred J. Barr, future director of the Museum of Modern Art. This friendship, as well as the admiration and patronage of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, an avid collector of his work and one of the founding members of the museum, led to Rivera's one-man show at the MoMA in 1931, an event that brought the artist into the American mainstream. Rivera created five "portable murals" specifically for the exhibition, completing them in the six weeks between his arrival in the city and the exhibition's opening. The show caused a buzz with the press and was a huge hit with the public, solidifying Rivera's status in America. His work was so well received that he completed three additional murals of New York scenes after the show's opening and received numerous additional mural commissions across America (notably the Detroit Industry Murals, 1932-33, for the Ford Motor Company). Carl Zigrosser, director of the Weyhe Gallery and advocate of modern Mexican art, met the artist while he was in New York for his MoMA show. Zigrosser recognized the Rivera's rising popularity and encouraged him to embrace lithography as a way to capitalize on his success and disseminate his art. Imagery used in his murals inspired (and in some cases was replicated in) his prints, such as meditations on his heritage and identity, Mexican history, political strife and the celebration of the working class. Rivera also made several intimate portraits of his then-wife, Frida Kahlo. The artist created only fourteen prints in his entire career, mainly lithographs published by the Weyhe Gallery, as well as one linoleum cut in the late 1930s in Mexico.
Diego Rivera -  ‘madre Tierra’’

Diego Rivera - ‘madre Tierra’’

Original 1923
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Lot number: 4
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Detailed description Known for his exaltation of Mexican culture, this drawing features Diego Rivera’’’’s signature muralist style. “Mother Earth” is depicted at center, her arms filled with the life she creates and sustains. Farmers and workers stand alongside trees, fruits and industry, representing all facets of the artist’’’’s home country. Although the forms are relatively simplistic, the drawing is rich with detail and activity. Executed in 1923, this pencil on paper is signed and dated in pencil lower right. The work is accompanied by a letter of authentication, signed and dated by Enrique Navas Pincon, the director of Galeria Europa, Colombia, with the gallery’’’’s blind stamp. The work is in overall good condition with no evidence of tears or repairs. Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886-1957) Most well-known for his large-scale frescoes, Diego Rivera was born in Guanajuato, Mexico and was encouraged to explore his artistic talents from a young age. He attended the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City at the age of ten and continued his studies abroad in Madrid and Paris in 1907 where he met numerous significant artists like Amedeo Modigliani and Moïse Kisling. Stylistically, Rivera adopted Cubism from 1913 until he transitioned to Post-Impressionism in 1917. After 1921, Rivera returned to Mexico to join a government sponsored mural program and began creating frescoes reflecting Mexican society, Aztec inspirations, and radical politics. In 1931, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, hosted a retrospective of the artist. His work can be found in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Hermitage Museum, Museum of Modern Art, and Museo Diego Rivera. Diego Rivera, Pencil on Paper, ‘Madre Tierra’’, 1923 Signed and dated in pencil lower right ‘D. Rivera 23’’’’
Diego Rivera - Figures

Diego Rivera - Figures

Original 1924
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Net Price
Lot number: 485
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DIEGO RIVERA (Mexico, 1886-1957) Fine Art, Post War and Contemporary Two collotypes with watercolor of figures, 1924 and 1938 (both framed) Each signed and dated in stone 15" x 10 1/2" (sheet) (irregular) Condition Report: Both in good condition. Hand painted colors, likely by another hand. Attached top corners. Floated in frames. DISCLAIMER Rago Unreserved is an “as-is, where-is” absolute auction. No returns. Condition reports are provided upon request. The absence of a condition report does not imply that there are no condition issues with the lot. If you would like additional information, please call (609) 397-9374, fax condition report requests to (609) 397-9377 or e-mail them to info@ragoarts.com. Our specialists will respond to requests as quickly as possible. Condition reports are rendered as specialist opinion by the staff of the Auction House and/or independent consultants and not as statements of fact. We do not guarantee the content of written or verbal condition reports. Please be patient. We get many requests and we make every effort to respond to all of them in a timely fashion. The Auction House is not liable or responsible for any errors or failure to do so.
Diego Rivera - Self-portrait

Diego Rivera - Self-portrait

Original 1930
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Lot number: 48
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This self-portrait by Diego Rivera shows the artist at the age of forty-four. The detail is primarily around the face with his large, bulging eyes and his double-chin, while his garments have been left bare. This work is one of many self-portraits the artist created throughout his lifetime. The lithograph has an image dimension of 15 x 11 ¾ inches, a sheet dimension of 18 ½ x 13 ½ inches and an overall dimension of 35 ¾ x 30 x 1 ¾ inches. It is signed in graphite at the lower left ‘Diego Rivera’’’’ and also signed with artist’’’’s initials and dated in the plate at the lower left ‘D.R. 30’’’’. It is from an edition of one hundred lithographs. Most well-known for his large-scale frescoes, Diego Rivera was born in Guanajuato, Mexico and was encouraged to explore his artistic talents from a young age. He attended the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City at the age of ten and continued his studies abroad in Madrid and Paris in 1907 where he met numerous significant artists like Amedeo Modigliani and Moïse Kisling. Stylistically, Rivera adopted Cubism from 1913 until he transitioned to Post-Impressionism in 1917. After 1921, Rivera returned to Mexico to join a government sponsored mural program and began creating frescoes reflecting Mexican society, Aztec inspirations, and radical politics. From 1927 and on, Diego received numerous international commissions but caused much controversy over his work, resulting in many to be taken down. Rivera had a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1931 with fellow artist and third wife, Frida Kahlo, in attendance. Institutions like the Art Institute of Chicago, Hermitage Museum, Museum of Modern Art, and Museo Diego Rivera include his art in their collections today. Lithograph on wove paper Mexico, 1930 Diego Rivera (1886-1957) – Mexican artist known for his large-scale frescoes ‘Self-Portrait’’’’ Signed in graphite lower left ‘Diego Rivera’’’’ Signed with artist’’’’s initials and dated in stone lower left ‘D.R. 30’’’’ Edition of 100 Full margins; framed and matted, floating on mat Image dimensions: 15 x 11 ¾ in. (38.1 x 29.8 cm.) Sheet dimensions: 18 ½ x 13 ½ in. (47 x 34.3 cm.) Overall dimensions: 35 ¾ x 30 x 1 ¾ in. (90.8 x 76.2 x 4.4 cm.) This item is located in New York
Diego Rivera - Vendedora De Retazos

Diego Rivera - Vendedora De Retazos

Original 1937
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Gross Price
Lot number: 136
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Diego Rivera (1886-1957) VENDEDORA DE RETAZOS signed and dated 37 lower right watercolor and india ink on rice paper 15 1/4 by 11 in. 39 by 28 cm Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication We wish to thank Professor Luis-Martín Lozano for his kind assistance in confirming the authenticity of this lot. Provenance The Collection of Sidney Scheuer (acquired March 1937) Thence by descent to the late owner Literature Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, Diego Rivera, Catálogo general de obra de caballete, Mexico City, 1989, no. 1407, p. 185, illustrated This work has been examined under glass. Artist pinholes are present in all four corners. The colors are vibrant and the medium is stable. The work is in very good condition overall. In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
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