Diego Rivera

Mexico (Guanajuato 1886Città Del Messico 1957 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Diego Rivera
RIVERA Diego Fruits Of Labor

Swann Galleries /Oct 29, 2014
11,126.77 - 14,835.69
20,399.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
599

Some works of Diego Rivera

Extracted between 599 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Diego Rivera - Russian Revolutionary Mural/lenin

Diego Rivera - Russian Revolutionary Mural/lenin

Original 1955
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Lot number: 6265
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Description:
Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886-1957), "Russian Revolutionary Mural/Lenin," 1955, graphite on paper, signed and dated lower left, sight: 12.5"h x 9.25"w, overall: 22.5"h x 18.5"w. Provenance: Property of a Berkeley, California collection; Acquired directly from artist, a gift from Rivera to Ernesto Madero Vazquez (A Mexican diplomat in Moscow, 1953-1962), descended in the Madero family (Tepoztlan, Mexico)
Diego Rivera - Soldados

Diego Rivera - Soldados

Original 1928
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Gross Price
Lot number: 56
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Description:
DIEGO RIVERA (1886-1957) Soldados signed and dated 'Diego Rivera.28' (lower right) graphite and grey wash on paper 6 1/2 x 8 3/4 in (16.3 x 22.2 cm) Drawn in 1928 Footnotes Diego Rivera was invited to Russia in the fall of 1927 to participate in the celebrations surrounding the 10th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution, and stayed until the early summer of 1928. The trip inspired a number of projects, and an even greater number of sketches of Russian scenes and Soviet celebrations such as the May Day parades. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, holds a complete sketchbook from the trip, a gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. The heavy coats and winter equipment of these Soldados suggest that they are Russian rather than Mexican infantry.
Diego Rivera - Niño En El Patio

Diego Rivera - Niño En El Patio

Original 1928
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Net Price
Lot number: 52
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Description:
Description: DIEGO RIVERA (mexican, 1886-1957)/span NIÑO EN EL PATIO Pencil signed and dated 28 bottom left, watercolor and black crayon on Japanese paper. 6 1/4 x 8 3/8 in. (15.9 x 21.3cm) provenance: /spanMrs. J. Stogdell Stokes, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. By descent in family. Mr. and Mrs. John S. Price, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. frame: 9 x 11 1/4 in.
Diego Rivera - Fruits Of Labor

Diego Rivera - Fruits Of Labor

Original 1932
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Gross Price
Lot number: 379
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Description:
DIEGO RIVERA Fruits of Labor. Lithograph, 1932. 417x298 mm; 16 1/2x1 3/4 inches, full margins. Signed, dated and numbered 72/100 in pencil, lower margin. A superb impression of this very scarce, important lithograph. Diego Rivera (1886-1957), the painter who helped establish the Mexico Mural Movement and was a leading figure in Social Realism, was born in Guanajuato in North-Central Mexico. His well-to-do family encouraged Rivera's artistic avidity from a young age; his parents installed chalkboards and canvases around the house after coming home one afternoon to find the walls covered in their toddler's drawings. In 1897, Rivera began studying at the oldest art school in Latin America, the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City (now the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes). He stayed until 1907 (three years before the start of the Mexican Revolution) at which point Rivera left for Europe to continue his studies. Rivera spent the better part of the next 14 years abroad, mainly in Paris, where he was deeply involved in the thriving avant-garde art scene. Rivera was submerged in the artistic circle in Montparnasse and was good friends with Modigliani, who painted several portraits of him in 1914.. Despite being away from Mexico, Rivera intently followed the political situation at home. The Mexican Revolution officially ended in 1920, after a decade of bloodshed and political upheaval. The new government, led by Álvaro Obregón, decided to utilize art as a vehicle to unify society and promote their values of equality. Rivera was recruited for this effort; he was asked by the government to first take a tour Italy to study Renaissance frescoes (this classical influence is easily detected in his work) and then to return to Mexico as a muralist. The country's Minister of Education commissioned local artists, among them Rivera, to create murals around Mexico City to celebrate the lives of the working class and the indigenous people. Rivera embraced the projects and, as a result of them, quickly gained recognition and prominence as a leading muralist in Mexico.. Simultaneously, Rivera was garnering the attention of the Soviet Union for his outspoken support of Communism. In 1928, while in Russia on an invitation from the government, Rivera met and befriended Alfred J. Barr, future director of the Museum of Modern Art. This friendship, as well as the admiration and patronage of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, an avid collector of his work and one of the founding members of the museum, helped led to Rivera's one-man show at MoMA in 1931, an event that brought the artist into the American mainstream. The show was the museum's second solo exhibition, after only Matisse's, since the museum's 1929 inception. Rivera created five "portable murals" specifically for the exhibition, completing them in the six weeks between his arrival in the city and the exhibition's opening. The show caused a buzz with the press and was a huge hit with the public, solidifying Rivera's status in America. His work was so well received that he completed three additional murals of New York scenes after the show's opening and received numerous additional mural commissions across America (notably the Detroit Industry Murals, 1932-33, for the Ford Motor Company). Carl Zigrosser, director of the Weyhe Gallery and advocate of modern Mexican art, met the artist while Rivera was in New York for his MoMA show. Zigrosser recognized the artist's rising popularity and encouraged Rivera to embrace lithography as a way to make money and disseminate his art. Imagery used in his murals inspired (and in some cases was replicated in) his prints, such as meditations on his heritage and identity, Mexican history, political strife, and the celebration of the working class. Rivera also made several intimate portraits of his then-wife, Frida Kahlo. The artist created only fourteen prints in his entire career, mainly lithographs published by the Weyhe Gallery, as well as one linoleum cut in the late 1930s in Mexico.
Diego Rivera - Portrait Of A Woman Holding A Child

Diego Rivera - Portrait Of A Woman Holding A Child

Original 1934
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Net Price
Lot number: 592
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Description:
Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886-1957) Portrait of a Woman Holding a Child, Possibly The Mexican Mart Signed and dated "Diego Rivera 1934" l.r. Watercolor and conté crayon on Japan paper, sheet size approx. 15 x 11 in. (38.1 x 27.9 cm), framed. Condition: Subtle rippling/paper irregularities, sandwiched between window mat and backing sheet. Provenance: Collection of David L. Neumann (b. 1902), long-time Santa Fe dealer and scholar on Navajo turquoise, Navajo silversmithing, and American Spanish Colonial crafts. Following his graduation from the University of Michigan in 1925, Neumann attended the Académie Julian and resided in Paris's Montparnasse. Around 1928, Neumann returned to the United States, where he traveled extensively through the American Southwest, trading on reservations and in Mexico in the 1930s and 1940s. From 1932 to 1954, Neumann contributed a series of articles to the venerable El Palacio magazine on the status of Navajo Indian silverwork. Photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo documented the work of Mexican mural painters including Diego Rivera. While the subject of the present work is unknown, it may depict a patron at Neumann's retail shop in Miami, Florida, called "The Mexican Mart," which he operated from the early to mid-1930s. N.B. Eight gelatin silver prints (seven by Bravo, two stamped and five unstamped) including one depicting the present work inscribed "Mr. David Newman [ sic ]--/'The Mexican Mart' Oct-9-34." on the reverse, accompany the lot. The edges of the sheet are not visible as the front mat is affixed to the backing mat all the way around, although the sheet itself is rippled so it is not laid down. There are no other issues to report. All seven of the photographs by Bravo depict Diego Rivera works; the eighth photograph by an unidentified photographer depicts a work by Carlos Camarra.
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