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Diego Rivera

Mexico (Guanajuato 1886 -  Città Del Messico 1957 ) Wikipedia® : Diego Rivera
RIVERA Diego  Untitled

Christie's
Nov 21, 2017
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Artworks in Arcadja
751

Some works of Diego Rivera

Extracted between 751 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Diego Rivera -  Untitled

Diego Rivera - Untitled

Original 1948
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Gross Price
Lot number: 142
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Diego Rivera (1886-1957) Untitled signed and dated 'Diego Rivera 1948' (upper left) watercolor on paper 26 x 20 1/8 in. (66 x 51.1 cm.) Executed in 1948. Provenance Private collection (gift from the artist). Private collection, Florida (by descent from the above to the present owner). Recommended features Pedro Friedeberg: Inventor of alternative realities ​The Mexican artist discusses his influences, painting on mannequins and works offered in the Latin American Art sale 10 things to know about Fernando Botero An essential guide to arguably South America\’s most famous artist, whose work addresses everything from domestic life to bullfighting Antenna: Time to award yourself bronze A look at bronze highlights from Christie's autumn season, spanning the breadth of human history \‘Hunter and I got on instantly because we were so different\’ ​As original artwork for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas comes to auction, its illustrator Ralph Steadman shares memories of Hunter S. Thompson Luxury Living: Homes with ornate interiors From a lavish 16th-century villa in Italy to the quintessential Paris apartment with all the (gilt) trimmings — all from Christie\’s International Real Estate <br>" />
Diego Rivera - Retrato De Un Español (portrait Of A Spaniard)

Diego Rivera - Retrato De Un Español (portrait Of A Spaniard)

Original 1912
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Lot number: 7
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Diego Rivera (1886-1957) signed lower right oil on canvas 78 1/2 by 65 in. 199 by 165 cm Painted in 1912. We wish to thank Professor Luis-Martín Lozano for his kind assistance in confirming the authenticity of this lot. Provenance Sale: Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, 15 May, 1968, lot 91 Fondation Oscar Ghez, Geneva Collection Petit Palais,Geneva Sale: Christie's, New York, Important Latin American Paintings, Drawings, Sculpture and Prints, May 18, 1994, lot 7, illustrated in color Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Paris, Salon d'Automne, October-November, 1912, no. 1443 Munich, Kgl. Kunstausstellungsgebaude, Secession: Frühjahr-Ausstellung, March 13-May 30, 1913, no. 266 Geneva, Grand Palais, Exposition de Renoir à Picasso, 1971, n.n. Geneva, Petit Palais, Retrospective Marevna, January 8-February 14, 1971, n.n. Charleroi, Palais de Beaux Arts, Montparnasse,January 18-February 20, 1973 Mexico City, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, Diego Rivera: Exposición nacional de Homenaje, December, 1977-February, 1978 Punta del Este, Galería Sur, Maestros del Siglo XX, January, 1991, n.n. Málaga, Museo del Patrimonio Municipal, July 1-August 28, 2011; Sevilla, Casa de la Provincia, September 7-October 20, 2011;Diego Rivera, cubista : de la Academia a la vanguardia, 1907-1921, illustrated in color Literature Fernand Roches, "Le Salon d'Automne," L'Art Décoratif, October 1912, illustrated Bertram D. Wolfe, Diego Rivera, His Life and Times, New York, 1939, no. 13, p. 55, illustrated Bertram D. Wolfe, Diego Rivera, Su vida, su obra y su época, Santiago de Chile, 1941, n.p., illustrated Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, Diego Rivera: Catálogo general de obra de caballete, Mexico City, 1989, no. 86, p. 19, illustrated Pete Hamill, Diego Rivera, New York, 1999, p. 32, illustrated in color Catalogue Note The illustrious Salon d\’Automne—from its inception the world\’s leading avant-garde venue along with the Salon des Artistes Indépendants—opened its annual exhibition at the Grand Palais on October 1, 1912. Displaying over seventeen hundred paintings and sculptures to an expectant Parisian public, it included a portrait section of nineteenth century paintings all executed by French artists and, most notoriously, a gallery of increasingly scandalous and rejected Cubist works such as La Maison Cubiste, a three dimensional installation that housed works by Duchamp, Léger, Gleizes and others. It was for this Salon that Diego Rivera prepared two large format paintings: Retrato de un español(Portrait of a Spaniard)and The Crock, both dated 1912. By this time, Rivera was extremely anxious about the development of his craft. Residing in Paris, he counted Modigliani, Picasso, and many other artists—all champions of an incessant revolution—among his closest friends. Through them, Rivera understood the need to produce \“a fully modern concept of modernity, free from regional themes, far from naturalism and extremely intellectual.\” (1) While thoroughly committed to the modernist cause, Rivera was simultaneously seeking a stylistic breakthrough through the canons of art history. His legendary vitality and passion were concentrated on studying the work of one artist in particular: Doménikos Theotokópoulos, most widely known as El Greco (1541-1614). Such adherence and reverence to the old master tradition found itself in a direct collision course with recent developments in the Parisian art world: Rivera\’s two works at the Salon d\’Automne were hanging in close proximity to Francis Picabia's (1879-1953) radical La Source (1912), Kupka\’s Amorpha, Fugue a Deux Couleurs (1912), Amedeo Modiglani\’s (1884-1920) Tête sculptures and Jean Metzinger\’s (1883-1956) Danseuse au Café, among others. Interestingly, Marcel Duchamp's (1887-1968) Nu Descendant un Escalier No. 2 (1912), now considered an icon of modernism, was rejected to participate in the same Salon. In addition to El Greco, Rivera was intensely focused in studying Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Georges Seurat (1859-1891). The shock of Cézanne came abruptly. Critic and promoter of Mexican art Frances Flynn Paine noted in the exhibition catalogue of Diego Rivera at The Museum of Modern Art, New York in 1931 that \“in February 1910, [Rivera] saw an exhibition of Cézanne\’s and the impression was such that it gave him, after he spent a day in the studio, a nervous fever …/.. the doctor diagnosed Diego\’s very high temperature as produced entirely by a severe nervous shock. The work of Cézanne had opened up for Diego the endless possibilities of modern art. He became almost fanatical in his admiration for his painting.\” (2) Painted in 1912, Retrato de un español (Portrait of a Spaniard)emerged within a deeply ideological and fiercely creative cultural milieu—the most consequential in the history of modern art. We now know this is a portrait of Hermenegildo Alsina, a fine books binder and Spanish decorative artist who was a close friend of Rivera in Madrid, Barcelona and later in Paris. Originally known as Portrait of Hermenegildo Alsina, the painting was exhibited under this title at the Paris Salon and at the Kunstausstellungsgebaude, Secession in Munich in 1913. After its re-appearance at Sotheby\’s in 1968, it was wrongly titled Portrait of Utrillo and also asPortrait of Eduardo Chicharro, the artist\’s mentor at the San Fernando Academy in Madrid. Diego himself referred to it as The Man with the Umbrella in his memoirs My Art, My Life. Occupying the complete height of the painting, Hermenegildo Alsina, the \“Spaniard,\” is depicted as an elongated figure in a barren landscape. Strong echoes of El Greco\’s St John the Baptist (circa 1600) at the Museo de Bellas Artes, Valencia and San Bernardino de Siena (1603) (Fig. 1) at the Prado Museum, Madrid are visible in the figure\’s languid, fragile pose. Masterly rendered are the famously tormented skies reminiscent of the ones portrayed in St. John the Baptist.Professor Martín-Lozano noted an additional visual reference and possible source of inspiration: El Anacoreta (the Anchorite)(Fig. 2), a landmark painting by Ignacio Zuloaga (1870-1945) of 1907 now at the Musée du Quai d\’Orsay in Paris. Depicting the emaciated body of a hermit, the impossibly elongated figure dominates the foreground rising upward from the earth like a grown tree,his fingers and hands crisscrossed as he vacuously stares at the sky. Unlike in the old master paintings, Rivera\’s Spaniard stares confidently at the viewer.The young man projects acarefully constructed air of nonchalance. Embodying the image of a dandy, he is casually attired in a fashionable hat and an elegant brown overcoat. A green feathered necktie complements his cultivated look as he retains the viewer\’s attention with absolute finesse. As in El Greco\’s painting, Rivera's composition reveals a vividly agitated sky filled with onerous grey clouds. White strokes of paint seem to radiate from the Spaniard as to symbolize a halo of earthly sanctity. When comparing the finished work toBoceto para el retrato deun español (ca. 1912), offered in these rooms in November 2016, (Fig. 3) a number of differences arise: while Alsina hides his hands inside the pockets of his long coat, the finished version depicts him delicately holding an umbrella: a vital accessory of the fashion forward \‘man about town.\’ Most striking is the recent discovery by [Spanish curator] Julio Niebla of a photograph portraying a young Hermenegildo Alsina. The discovery of this photograph belonging to the collection of Alsina\’s descendants reveals two distinct possibilities: either Rivera had the model pose for him in situ somewhere in the woods near Barcelona and finish the composition in his studio at a later point, or the artist casually saw the photograph and decided to work directly from this image. In both the photo (anonymous, undated) and the study, Alsina presents the same languid frontal pose. The study, however, reveals an immediacy lacking in the finished canvas. Alsina\’s walk seems to have been suddenly interrupted as if surprised by the sudden gaze of the photographer. In contrast to the photo, his left foot appears slightly turned towards the back while in the sketch it is placed on an equal plane. Although a man of considerable height, Alsina was purposely \“elongated\” by Rivera in the Mannerist style of El Greco and Zuloaga. An additional difference between this photographic document and the painting is the background. As an idealized rendition of a genre painting, the Spaniard is portrayed against a barren landscape with colors reminiscent of the Castilian dry plateau. Devoid of trees and vines, a sense of vastness, of absolute infinity triumphs over the landscape thus further alienating the Spaniard from terrestrial concerns. After exhibiting Retrato de un español (Portrait of a Spaniard)at the Salon d\’Automne that fall, Diego returned to Spain to continue a dramatic series of Toledo landscapes depicting a variety of views surrounding the town's medieval wall. There he would complete another important painting: The Adoration of the Shepherds (1912-1913). The latter canvas points to Rivera\’s stylistic departure from this pivotal Spanish phase, a period when he first reached artistic maturity splendidly represented by Retrato de un español. (1) Luis Martín-Lozano,Diego Rivera, Cubista, de la Academia a la Vanguardia, 1907/1921,Museo del Patrimonio Municipal de Málaga (MUPAM), Málaga, 2011. (2) Diego Rivera, Museum of Modern Art, December 23 1931 to January 27, New York, 1932, p. 19- 20. Fig. 1 El Greco, Saint John the Baptist, circa 1600, oil on canvas, 111 x 66 cm Fig. 2 Ignacio Zuloaga, The Hermit, 1907, oil on canvas, 188 x 115 cm © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VEGAP, Madrid Fig. 3 Diego Rivera, Boceto para el retrato de un español, circa 1912, oil on wood, 18½ by 14¼ in Fig. 4 Hermén Alsina, model for Retrato de un español, circa 1912
Diego Rivera - Hilando

Diego Rivera - Hilando

Original 1936
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Lot number: 48
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Diego Rivera (1886-1957) Hilando (La tejedora) signed and dated 'Diego Rivera.36' (upper left) watercolor and graphite on paper 22 3/4 x 20 7/8 in (57.8 x 53 cm) Painted in 1936 Footnotes Provenance Dean Martin and Jeanne Martin, Beverly Hills, and thence by descent to the present owner. Bonhams is honored to offer this work by Diego Rivera from the Collection of the late Dean Martin and Jeanne Martin. Best known as an actor, comedian, singer and entertainer extraordinaire, Dean Martin – "The King of Cool" – was a member of The Rat Pack, along with fellow entertainers Frank Sinatra, Joey Bishop, Peter Lawford and Sammy Davis, Jr. In 1949, Dean married Jeanne, a former Orange Bowl queen from Coral Gables, Florida. The couple had three children, together with four children from Dean's previous marriage. The rediscovered work being offered is shown in the background of a 1966 family portrait taken at their 601 Mountain Drive home in Beverly Hills. With an affinity for the arts of Mexico, Jeanne collected pre-Columbian pottery and in the Living Room of the Martin Ranch in Hidden Valley, California, she included traditional Mexican textiles – the very same type being woven in the present work. Diego Rivera, Hilando (La Tejedora) Professor Luis-Martín Lozano Diego Rivera has taken his place in the history of art as the most prominent painter of the 20th Century Mexican Muralist Movement. However, he was also the author of a notable body of easel paintings, watercolors and drawings which, because of their intimacy, are of unquestionable importance. Rivera lived in Europe for 14 years, from 1907 to 1921, returning to Mexico to take part in the cultural rebirth that followed the revolution. He had been a painter of the avant-garde, a renowned Cubist, a friend of Picasso, and a fixture on the international art market, but he returned to the country of his birth to paint murals as part of a grand project of national reconstruction termed by historians as a Mexican Renaissance. While he never renounced what he had learned in Europe, he also discovered the essence of Mexico, more so than any other painter of his time, and held a firm ideological conviction of the importance of re-evaluating the history and culture of the Mexican people, particularly of indigenous people, peasants and the most disadvantaged classes. His empathy for Mexican woman and children as they went about their daily duties, faithful to their heritage and traditions, was reflected not just in his murals but also in drawings and watercolors such as the present example. Here, Rivera depicts with enormous dignity, an indigenous Mexican woman in the quiet task of weaving a textile using a traditional waist-loom, a technique which goes back to Pre-Hispanic times. Seated with her legs tucked under her, she is at one with her destiny. The composition allows a glimpse of her skillful weaving and of the similarly decorated clothes she is wearing. Diego Rivera addressed this theme on several occasions, particularly in the 1930s. This watercolor, signed and dated 1936, and previously unknown to scholars, is a version of a larger format oil and tempera painting of the same year used as one of Rivera's illustrations to Bertram D. Wolfe's Portrait of Mexico (New York, 1937, pl. 90) [another now at the Art Institute of Chicago,] and of another watercolor, of the same year and format, which shows the same woman seated on a chair (recorded by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes; L. Cortés Gutiérrez (ed.), Diego Rivera: catálogo general de obra de caballete, Mexico City, 1989, p. 169, no. 1273). Rivera returned to the subject of Mexican indigenous women in other compositions, notably the beautiful oil of 1936 now in the collection of the Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona. Professor Luis-Martín Lozano Art Historian We would like to thank Professor Lozano for preparing this essay. Diego Rivera (1886-1957) ha trascendido a la historia del arte Universal como el más destacado de los pintores que participó en el Movimiento muralista mexicano del siglo XX. Empero, es también el autor de una notable producción de pinturas de caballete, acuarelas y dibujos, que por su intimidad son también de una trascendencia incuestionable. Después de haber vivido 14 años en Europa, entre 1907 y 1921, Diego Rivera regresó a México para insertarse en el Renacimiento cultural de la postrevolución. Tras haberse convertido en un pintor de la vanguardia, destacado cubista amigo de Picasso y ubicarse en un mercado internacional, retornó a su país para pintar murales como parte de un gran proyecto de reconstrucción nacional, que los críticos bien han denominado Mexican Renaissance. Sin renunciar nunca a lo que aprendió en Europa, Rivera descubrió las raíces de México, como quizá ninguno otro pintor de su época, y tuvo una firme convicción ideológica de revalorar la historia y cultura de los mexicanos, particularmente de los indígenas, campesinos y clases mas desfavorecidas. Su acercamiento amoroso a los niños y mujeres de México, en su diaria labor y la expresión de sus raíces, quedó reafirmado no sólo en sus grandes pinturas murales, sino en dibujos y acuarelas como la que ahora nos ocupa y que ahora sale a subasta. Aquí Rivera ha capturado, con enorme dignidad, a una indígena mexicana en su callada labor de tejer un textil a la manera tradicional del "telar a la cintura", el cual se remonta a la época prehispánica: postrada sobre el piso, asume su destino, dejando entrever la belleza artesanal de su ejecución, como también la vestimenta que lleva puesta. Este tema habría de ser tratado por Diego Rivera en numerosas ocasiones, particularmente en la década de los años treinta. Esta acuarela, firmada y fechada en 1936, que no estaba catalogada por los especialistas es una variante de una composición que ejecutó al óleo y temple, en un formato mayor y el mismo año, y que aparece reproducida en el libro: Portrait of México, publicada en Nueva York por Covici en 1937 (pl. 90); y asimismo de otra acuarela, del mismo formato y año, donde la mujer aparece sentada en una silla y la cual está catalogada por el Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (Diego Rivera: catálogo general de obra de caballete, México, 1989, p. 169, no. 1273). Sobre este tema de la mujer indígena mexicana tejiendo a la usanza tradicional, Rivera habría de regresar en otras composiciones, como la muy bella pintura al óleo sobre tela también de 1936, que custodia en su colección el Phoenix Art Museum. Profesor Luis-Martín Lozano Historiador del arte
Diego Rivera - Guardante Silente De La Verdad, En El Tramo De La Revelación Del Camino

Diego Rivera - Guardante Silente De La Verdad, En El Tramo De La Revelación Del Camino

Original c.1925
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Lot number: 78
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Description: DIEGO RIVERA (mexican, 1886-1957) "GUARDANTE SILENTE DE LA VERDAD, EN EL TRAMO DE LA 'REVELACIÓN DEL CAMINO'" study for chapingo mural, chapel Pencil signed bottom right, graphite on paper laid down to cardboard. Executed circa 1925. 22 7/8 x 23 3/4 in. (58.1 x 60.3cm) provenance: Private Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. By family descent. Private Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. literature: Luis-Martín Lozano and Juan Rafael Coronel Rivera, Diego Rivera, The Complete Murals, Taschen, 2008 (pp. 182 and 189, final mural version illustrated). note: We are grateful to Professor Luis-Martín Lozano for his assistance cataloguing this work. The present drawing is a working study for one of the famous true fresco murals at Escuela Nacional de Agricultura in Chapingo, Mexico (today known as the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Chapingo). Between 1923 and 1928, Rivera began the ambitious project that covered over 700 square meters of the walls and ceilings of the school's entrance hall, staircase, administration offices and Assembly Hall in the Ex Chapel. Rivera's two main subjects were "Song to the Earth and Those Who Work the Land" and "And to Those who Struggle to Make it a Place Conducive to Life and Freedom of the Human Genre". These murals reflected the school's creed, "To teach the exploitation of the Land, not the exploitation of Men. The final version of the present work, "Silent Guardian of the Truth," is one of several male figures shown in the ceiling vault surrounding the central scene, "Revelation of the Road to Follow." The figures are depicted in architectural 'squinch' areas that support and surround the domed ceiling above the recumbent image of Mother Nature in "The Liberated Earth with The Powers of Nature Controlled by Man." He is one of the two main Guardians, who with a vigilant attitude and machete in hand, will defend the goals of the Mexican Revolution that will bring social change to the country and its people. Working drawings for murals for the Chapingo series come rarely to auction, and Freeman's is delighted to present this work on behalf of a private family collection where it was enjoyed for over 40 years.
Diego Rivera - Zapata

Diego Rivera - Zapata

Original 1932
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Gross Price
Lot number: 280
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Sale 2454 Lot 280 DIEGO RIVERA Zapata. Lithograph, 1932. 413x335 mm; 16 1/4x13 1/4 inches, wide margins. Signed, dated and numbered 57/100 in pencil, lower margin. A superb impression of this large, scarce and important lithograph. Rivera (1886-1957), who helped establish the Mexico Mural Movement and was a leading artistic figure in Social Realism, was born in Guanajuato in North-Central Mexico. His well-to-do family encouraged his artistic avidity from a young age; his parents installed chalkboards and canvases around the house after coming home one afternoon to find the walls covered in their toddler's drawings. In 1897, Rivera began studying at the oldest art school in Latin America, the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City (now the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes). He remained until 1907 (three years before the start of the Mexican Revolution) at which point he left for Europe to continue his studies. Rivera spent the better part of the next 14 years abroad, mainly in Paris, where he was deeply involved in the thriving avant-garde art scene. Rivera was submerged in the artistic circle in Montparnasse and was friends with Amedeo Modigliani, who painted several portraits of him in 1914. Despite his absence from Mexico, Rivera intently followed the political situation at home. The Mexican Revolution officially ended in 1920, after a decade of bloodshed and political upheaval. The new government, led by Álvaro Obregón, decided to utilize art as a vehicle to unify society and promote their values of equality. Rivera was recruited for this effort; the Mexican government prompted him to first take a tour of Italy to study Renaissance frescoes (this classical influence is easily detected in his work) and then to return to Mexico as a muralist. The country's Minister of Education commissioned local artists, among them Rivera, to create murals around Mexico City to celebrate the lives of the working class and the indigenous people. Rivera embraced the projects and, as a result of them, quickly gained recognition and prominence as a leading muralist in Mexico. Rivera was simultaneously garnering the attention of the Soviet Union for his outspoken support of Communism. In 1928, while in Russia on an invitation from the government, Rivera met and befriended Alfred J. Barr, future director of The Museum of Modern Art. This friendship, as well as the admiration and patronage of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, an avid collector of his work and one of the founding members of the museum, led to Rivera's one-man show at Mo MA in 1931, an event that brought the artist into the American mainstream. Rivera created five "portable murals" specifically for the exhibition, completing them in the six weeks between his arrival in the city and the exhibition's opening. The show caused a buzz with the press and was a huge hit with the public, solidifying Rivera's status in America. His work was so well received that he completed three additional murals of New York scenes after the show's opening and received numerous additional mural commissions across America (notably the Detroit Industry Murals, 1932-33, for the Ford Motor Company). Carl Zigrosser, director of the Weyhe Gallery and advocate of modern Mexican art, met the artist while he was in New York for his Mo MA show. Zigrosser recognized the Rivera's rising popularity and encouraged him to embrace lithography as a way to capitalize on his success and disseminate his art. Imagery used in his murals inspired (and in some cases was replicated in) his prints, such as meditations on his heritage and identity, Mexican history, political strife and the celebration of the working class. Rivera also made several intimate portraits of his then-wife, Frida Kahlo. The artist created only fourteen prints in his entire career, mainly lithographs published by the Weyhe Gallery, as well as one linoleum cut in the late 1930s in Mexico.
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