Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Armando Reveron

Venezuela (1889 -  1954 ) Wikipedia® : Armando Reveron
REVERON Armando  Rostro De Mujer

Christie's
Nov 21, 2017
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Armando Reveron at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Armando Reveron, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Roberto Matta, Mira Schendel, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Carlos Merida, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Gunther Gerzso, Alejandro Otero
Artworks in Arcadja
74

Some works of Armando Reveron

Extracted between 74 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Armando Reveron - Puerto Cerca De La Guaira

Armando Reveron - Puerto Cerca De La Guaira

Original 1940
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 219
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
PUERTO CERCA DE LA GUAIRA Armando Reverón 1889 - 1954 Signed Reverón and dated X40 (lower right) Oil and tempera onburlap mounted on metal 21 3/8 by 32 7/8 in. 54.3 by 83.5 cm Painted in 1940. Provenance Nat Weisblood, Malden (acquired directly from the artist circa 1940 and sold: Sotheby's, New York, December 3, 1981, lot 65) Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Caracas, Galería de Arte Nacional de Venezuela,Armando Reverón: Exposión iconográfica y documental en el centenario de su nacimiento,n.n., illustrated in color in the catalogue Biarritz, Espace Bellevue, Passion et raison d'un esprit constructif: Une conquête de l'art d'Amérique Latine, oeuvres de la Fundación Daniela Chappard, 2006, no. 58, illustrated in color in the catalogue Badajoz, Museo Extremeño e Iberoamericano de arte Contemporáneo de Badajoz, Explorando el sur. El universalismo constructivo y otras tendencias en América Latina, 2009, n.n., illustrated in color in the catalogue
Armando Reveron - La Verónica (cristo)

Armando Reveron - La Verónica (cristo)

Original 1950
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 98
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Armando Reverón (1889-1954) La Verónica (Cristo) signed 'A REVERÓN' (lower center) and inscribed 'La Verónica' (lower left), 'La Magdalena' (lower right) charcoal and tempera on newspaper 17 x 10 ¼ in. (43.2 x 26 cm.) Executed circa 1950. Provenance Anon. sale, Rincón de Arte, Caracas, 15 June 1970, lot 65. Acquired from the above by Janos Fenjves, Caracas. Anon. sale, Christie\’s, New York, 20 November 2013, lot 138 (by descent to from the above). Acquired from the above by the present owner.
Armando Reveron - Calle Del Puerto

Armando Reveron - Calle Del Puerto

Original 1942
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 115
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: ARMANDO REVERÓN - Calle del puerto Dimensions: 30 5/8 x 40 7/8 in. (77.8 x 103.8 cm.) Medium: oil on canvas Exhibited: Caracas, Centro Venezolano Americano, Armando Reverón Pinturas, November 23 - December 10, 1951 Caracas, Museo de Bellas Artes, Exposición Retrospectiva de Armando Reverón, July 1955 Boston, The Institute of Contemporary Art; Washington D.C., The Corcoran Gallery of Art; New Orleans, Isaac Delgado Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts Houston; San Francisco Museum of Art, Armando Reverón, 1956 Caracas, Instituto Venezolano Italiano de Cultura, Armando Reverón, April 9, 1961 Literature: Juan Calzadilla, Armando Reverón, Caracas, 1979, no. 282, p. 318 (illustrated) María Elena Huizi, Armando Reverón, Caracas, 2007, p. 58 (illustrated) Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner
Armando Reveron - Ranchos

Armando Reveron - Ranchos

Original 1933
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 189
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF BERNARD CHAPPARD Armando Reverón RANCHOS Armando Reverón 1889 - 1954 Signed AReverón and dated X33(lower right) Oil on burlap 25 1/4 by 27 3/4 in. 64.1 by 70.5 cm Painted in 1933. Provenance Private Collection, Caracas Sale: Christie's, New York,November 17, 1987, lot 6 Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Buenos Aires, Museo de Arte Latinoamericano-Fundación Constantini, Arte de América Latina, 2001, no. 26 Catalogue Note Ranchos by Venezuelan Armando Reverón shimmers with the spectacular light of the Caribbean landscape. Painted in 1933, the composition belongs to Reverón\’s celebrated \“white period,\” the iconic years between 1926 and 1934 when the translucent coastal landscapes of Macuto, Venezuela emerge as a focal point of his mature production. Bordering on monochromatic abstraction and intensely tactile,Ranchos elicits a luminous immateriality. However ethereal, exposed segments of blank canvas allow texture to materialize and assume a representational function. \“The Painter of White, of Silence, and of Solitude: The Mad Armando Reverón,\” as Raúl Carrasquel y Valverde famously referred to him in a article published in 1931, openly disdained \“absolutely brilliant colors of immediate effectiveness, and painted only in white, with whites, on white canvases that he prepared himself, with only faint recurrent touches of pale blue for shadows, highlights, and grand effects\” (Armando Reverón (exhibition catalogue), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2007, p. 125). Almost mythical in status, these rustic compositions were highly sought-after by Venezuelan society immediately upon their execution. Reintroduced to the public almost a century later at the artist\’s retrospective organized by the Museum of Modern Art in 2007,Reveron's paradisiac compositions pay homage to Latin America's rich landscape tradition.
Armando Reveron -  Rostro De Mujer

Armando Reveron - Rostro De Mujer

Original 1935
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 18
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Armando Reverón (1889-1954) Rostro de mujer oil on canvas 17 x 15 in. (43.2 x 38.1 cm.) Painted circa 1935. \“Reverón has made himself—with more propriety than the pigeons and the sea grape trees of the spa—into the first tourist attraction in Macuto,\” observed Mariano Picón Salas of the public\’s fascination with the artist and his coastal residence, El Castillete, at the end of the 1930s.[1] Reverón had settled permanently in the fishing village of Macuto with his model and companion Juanita Ríos in 1922, retreating from the intensifying military dictatorship in Caracas and in search of the freedoms of a simpler, bohemian life. He had traveled between Caracas and Europe during the prior decade, finding particular stimulation in the Spanish tradition that he encountered in Barcelona and Madrid: \“I studied Velázquez, Goya, El Greco. I was crazy about Velázquez\’s silvery grays and golds. Titian, Dürer, and Bosch—how great they were.\”[2] As he expanded El Castillete from a hut to a sprawling compound, his work evolved from a Symbolist \“blue period\” (1919-24) into the landscapes and figure paintings of the extraordinary \“white period\” of the later 1920s and 1930s, so called for their chromatic reduction to white and light-colored paint. Reverón turned increasingly to figure painting in the early 1930s, working first in small-scale portraiture and later producing larger canvases with multiple subjects that augured his \“sepia period\” around mid-decade. \“At that time and since then,\” Reverón declared of the period following his earliest paintings of Juanita, \“I have been searching for beauty beyond the simple image that represents the human figure, as in Las Meninas, which are magical figures beyond what they are in reality. For me reality should be a constant creation of light and colors.\”[3] His subjects, almost exclusively of women, ranged from Juanita and local campesinas to wealthy caraqueñas on vacation, drawn by nearby bathhouses and the luxurious Hotel Miramar; by the 1940s, he painted almost exclusively from the harem of life-sized dolls (muñecas) that he and Juanita made and among which they lived. Reverón himself became a draw, as tourists flocked to the spectacle of \“el loco de Macuto,\” an unfortunate epithet given credence by his diagnosis as schizophrenic in 1933, following the latest in a series of nervous breakdowns. \“The artist would isolate himself from all exterior contact,\” wrote Alfredo Boulton, Venezuela\’s foremost critic of the time and among the artist\’s early promoters, of Reverón\’s method. \“He would not touch metal; he would plug his ears with large wads of cotton or balls of yarn; and he would divide his body into two zones, cruelly tightening his belt [between them]. Later, in the middle of a ritual full of gestures and of noises, as if entering into a trance before the canvas, he would half-close his eyes, snort, and simulate the gestures of painting until the rhythm of the body and the gesticulations had acquired sufficient impetus and velocity. Then, as though in spasms, he would attack the canvas as if he were an animal ripping up the red cape of the bullfighter. Sometimes, in these attacks, he would go so far as to tear the canvas.\”[4] Reverón\’s \“indigenous series\” of the early 1930s encompassed native women, whom he described as \“daughters of the sun,\” as well as models dressed up as Indians, sometimes posed with feather headdresses. John Elderfield, curator of the major Reverón retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 2007, has suggested that the artist elided the Spanish majas seen in the paintings of his early career—and doubtless inspired by Goya\’s late-eighteenth-century Maja desnuda, which he saw at the Prado—with the young, indigenous subjects that appeared in the 1930s.[5] The present Rostro de mujer, a portrait of a woman wearing a black mantilla, suggests an analogous citation of the Spanish School, from Goya\’s renowned paintings of the Duchess of Alba to contemporary portraits by Joaquín Sorolla. Mantillas, the black lace veils traditionally worn by Spanish women to bullfights and during Holy Week, appear in a number of Reverón\’s later figure paintings of the 1940s, modeled by his muñecas in their transformation into native majas. Around 1940, Reverón and Juanita sewed a mantilla that portrays an imaginary bombing of Plaza Bolívar in Caracas, a scene likely conceived in the wake of the wartime invasions of London and the Netherlands; a creole object, their mantilla embodied the assimilation of Spanish ritual custom within the vernacular body and landscape of modern Venezuela. Held high in place by a comb, the black mantilla worn by the subject of Rostro de mujer drapes gracefully around her head and shoulders, framing her against background traces of Reverón\’s iconic white landscape, faintly dotted with palm trees. More formally posed and less languorous than many of his female subjects, she evokes the enigmatic femininity of his early Hispanic paintings, transported to the tropical coast. Abby Mc Ewen, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, College Park 1 Mariano Picón-Salas, \“Armando Reverón,\” Esta luz como para magos (Caracas: Fundación Museo Armando Reverón, 1992): 14, quoted in Armando Reverón (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2007), 138. 2 Armando Reverón, \“Through his Own Eyes,\” in Armando Reverón, 226. 3 Ibid., 227. 4 Alfredo Boulton, Reverón (Caracas: Ediciones Macanao, 1979): 100, 117, quoted in Armando Reverón, 138. 5 See John Elderfield, \“The Natural History of Armando Reverón,\” in Armando Reverón, 41. Provenance Alfredo Boulton (acquired from the artist). Dr. Antonio and Clara Requena, Caracas. CDS Gallery, New York (acquired from the above through Galería Muci, Caracas). Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY FROM THE COLLLECTION OF CLARA DIAMENT SUJO Exhibited New York, CDS Gallery, Latin American Masters, December 2007-February 2008. Studio visit: Pablo Atchugarry The Uruguayan sculptor talks Carrara marble and Michelangelo in his adopted home of Lecco on the shores of Lake Como Pedro Friedeberg: Inventor of alternative realities ​The Mexican artist discusses his influences, painting on mannequins and works offered in the Latin American Art sale 10 things to know about Fernando Botero An essential guide to arguably South America\’s most famous artist, whose work addresses everything from domestic life to bullfighting Antenna: Time to award yourself bronze A look at bronze highlights from Christie's autumn season, spanning the breadth of human history \‘Hunter and I got on instantly because we were so different\’ ​As original artwork for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas comes to auction, its illustrator Ralph Steadman shares memories of Hunter S. Thompson Luxury Living: Homes with ornate interiors From a lavish 16th-century villa in Italy to the quintessential Paris apartment with all the (gilt) trimmings — all from Christie\’s International Real Estate
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr