Charles Peale Polk

United States (17671822 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Charles Peale Polk
POLK Charles Peale Untitled

Freeman /Nov 22, 2008
31,740.99 - 47,611.49
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Artworks in Arcadja
11

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Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

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Lot number: 69
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Charles Peale Polk (American, 1767-1822) George Washington at Princeton verso of canvas inscribed No. 33. Cs. Polk/Painter oil on canvas 33½ x 28½ in. (Lots 69-85) Provenance Historical Society of Pennsylvania Lot Notes In this evocative portrait of George Washington at Princeton,Charles Peale Polk renders the triumphant General in the bold,linear style he mastered after studying with his uncle and famedWashington portraitist, Charles Willson Peale. Executed during thefirst term of Washington's presidency, Peale Polk references hisuncle's earlier portraits of Washington by including Nassau Hall, asymbolic reference to the victory of the Continental Army at theBattle of Princeton on January 3, 1777. The battle, which markedthe close of the ten crucial days following the Continental Army'scrossing of the Delaware River into New Jersey, took the Americanforces from the brink of defeat. After suffering a string ofdemoralizing losses in New York, the General achieved his firstvictories in combat at Trenton and Princeton. While the War was farfrom over, Washington's campaign in New Jersey demonstrated to theAmerican people, their allies abroad, and the soldiers themselvesthat the Continental Army was capable of defeating the British. Inthis portrait, Charles Peale Polk recalls the President's victoriesduring the Revolutionary War and his heralds ascendance to Fatherof the Nation. Charles Peale Polk was born in Maryland in 1767, the son of CaptainRobert Polk (1744-1777) and Charles Willson Peale's sister,Elizabeth Digby Peale (1747-c.1776). His mother died fromtuberculosis in about 1776 and a year later, his father was killedin battle. Orphaned at the age of ten, the young Polk was adoptedby his uncle, Charles Willson Peale, and, older than Peale'ssurviving children, became one of the famous artist's first familystudents. Polk practiced by emulating Peale's portraits, and at theage of eighteen, first advertised on his own with thefollowing: The subscriber begs leave to inform the public that having finishedhis studies under the celebrated Mr. Peale of Philadelphia inPortrait Painting, he is now ready to exert himself to the utmostof his abilities in taking LIKENESSES in oil. -The Virginia Journal and Alexandria Advertiser, June 30, 1785,cited in Linda Crocker Simmons, Charles Peale Polk, 1767-1822, ALimner and his Likenesses (Washington, D.C., 1981), p. 4. In 1790, around the time he started his "Princeton" series, Polkwrote to Washington requesting a sitting to capture his likeness.While Washington often recorded such sittings in his diary, hisentries for 1790 are missing, so it is not known whether Polk everhad the opportunity to paint the President from life (Simmons, pp.4-5). After living in Philadelphia and Baltimore, Polk lived inFrederick, Maryland and Washington, D.C., where he became involvedin politics and an ardent member of Thomas Jefferson's Republicanparty. In 1820, he retired to Richmond County, Virginia where hedied in 1822 at the age of fifty five (Simmons, pp.5-18).
Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

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Lot number: 6
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LOT 6 PROPERTY OF THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY CHARLES PEALE POLK 1767 - 1822 GEORGE WASHINGTON AT PRINCETON 400,000—600,000 USD measurements measurements 35 ½ by 27 in. alternate measurements (90.2 by 68.6 cm) Description signed Cs. Polk Painter and numbered No. 30 on the reverse oil on canvas Painted circa 1790-1793. PROVENANCE General William Dunn Bond, IrelandSold: Christie, Manson and Woods, London, February 19, 1971, lot125James A. Williams, Savannah, GeorgiaHirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, 1971Acquired by the present owner from the above LITERATURE AND REFERENCES The Connoisseur, no. 176, February 1971, p. 54,illustratedLinda Crocker Simmons, Charles Peale Polk, 1767-1822, A Limnerand His Likenesses, Washington D.C., 1981, no. 18, p. 28,illustrated CATALOGUE NOTE Charles Peale Polk painted a series of portraits of GeorgeWashington during the early part of Washington's presidency, inresponse to overwhelming public demand for images of the nation'snew leader. Polk had trained under his uncle, Charles WillsonPeale, having moved in with the Peale family at the age of ninefollowing his mother's death and his father's acceptance of apermanent commission at sea. When Polk began his series ofpresidential portraits, he based his likeness of Washington onPeale's 1787 "Convention" portrait, modifying Peale's formal,bust-length depiction into a distinctive composition of his own: ahalf-length portrait showing the President on the battlefield atPrinceton, New Jersey. The inclusion of Nassau Hall and a line ofsoldiers in the background was also borrowed from Peale, who hadpopularized the image of Washington at the battle of Princeton,where Peale had commanded a company of Philadelphia militia on thefront lines. Though Polk was only ten years old at the time of thebattle in 1777, he would have heard stories of the campaign fromhis uncle and was well aware of its historical significance. InPolk's version of Washington at Princeton, a subject he painted atleast fifty-seven times, the president appears at the height of hismilitary service as commander-in-chief of the American forces, hisblue and buff general's uniform updated to include three stars onthe epaulet, the designation for commander-in-chief beginning in1780. Whether or not Washington ever sat for Charles Peale Polkremains a mystery. In 1790 Polk traveled to New York, then the seatof the American government, and wrote to Washington that he hoped"... to obtain the Honorable privilege of One Short Setting fromthe President to enable him to finish a portrait of yourExcellency (in head Size) Prepared with that design. He has in theCourse of the last year Executed Fifty Portraits tho his advantageswere not what he wished. But Imagines if your Excellency's Leisureand Inclination will permit he shall hereafter be capable ofExhibiting more Just and Finished performances. The resemblance ofHim, whose Character will never be obliterated from the hearts ofTrue Americans" (Charles Peale Polk to George Washington, 6 August1790, The Papers of George Washington , Library of Congress).Washington's diary, where he typically recorded his portraitsittings, is unlocated for the year 1790. The present painting documents a critical period in thedevelopment of Polk's uniquely American style. Linda CrockerSimmons writes that between 1791 and 1798, "[Polk's] personal styleemerged. The modeling of forms became subordinate to draftsmanship.A pronounced interest in the decorative quality of the line wasevident. All objects were presented with equal attention to detail,further enhancing the shallowness of the space and the decorativequalities of the whole" (Charles Peale Polk, 1767-1822: A Limnerand his Likenesses , p. 9). Polk's portraits of Washingtondemonstrate the emergence of his own distinct style, and constitutea highly individual contribution to the body of early Presidentialportraiture. In contrast to his Peale cousins, Polk's styleactually became less academic as he matured as an artist, and theinfluence of European-trained Charles Willson Peale waned.
Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

Charles Peale Polk - George Washington At Princeton

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Lot number: 205
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Charles Peale Polk (1767-1822) George Washington at Princeton signed Cs Polk No. 47 Painter on reverse under lining oil on canvas 36 x 29 in. Provenance George D. Krumbhaar (1837-1916), Philadelphia and Cazenovia, NewYork Cornelia Cooper Krumbhaar (b. 1869), Cazenovia, New York,daughter Doll and Richards, Boston, Massachusetts The Reid Estate, Purchase, New York, circa 1971 Sotheby Parke-Bernet, New York, April 17, 1975, lot 13 The Claneil Foundation, Inc. Christie's New York, November 30, 1999, lot 33 Literature Linda Crocker Simmons, Charles Peale Polk, 1767-1822, A Limnerand His Likenesses (Washington D.C., 1981), p. 35, no.39. Lot Notes Painted during the first term of Washington's presidency, thisportrait heralds the triumphant General, his victories during theRevolutionary War and his ascendance to Father of the Nation. Withan assured, steady gaze, George Washington is rendered by CharlesPeale Polk in a bold, linear style that the young artist masteredafter training with his uncle and Washington portraitist, CharlesWillson Peale. Polk also imitated his uncle's earlier portraits ofWashington by including Nassau Hall, a symbolic reference to theAmerican success at the Battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777. Thebattle, which marked a critical turning point of the war, must havealso been a poignant personal memory for the young artist. Only tenyears old at the time, Polk was soon to be orphaned by the death ofhis father and was living in the Peale household while Pealehimself was among the troops that fought for victory at Princeton.The overall effect is of George Washington as the embodiment ofcomposure and heroism in the face of turbulent times, an ideal fromthe eighteenth-century that remains a powerful image in today'sAmerica. Charles Peale Polk executed this portrait in the early years of the1790s, using his uncle's 1787 "Convention" portrait of Washington(fig. 1) as the basis for the head and shoulders. Princeton'sNassau Hall, depicted in the background, was a powerful symbol ofboth the military successes and political beginnings of the newnation under the leadership of Washington. On January 3, 1777,Washington's forces achieved a spectacular victory at the Battle ofPrinceton, just ten days after he crossed the Delaware to overcomethe Hessian troops at Trenton. Occurring after more than a year ofretreat, these battles were crucial successes for the embattledAmerican forces and their victories encouraged much needed supportfrom other nations. During the battle, Nassau Hall was occupied byBritish troops and it is among the many references included inPeale's renowned portraits of Washington begun in 1779. AfterAmerica's military success at Yorktown in 1781 and the conclusionof the war, Nassau Hall once again played a prominent role. FromJune to November, 1783, it served as the country's capital and itwas here that Congress received the news of the signing of theTreaty of Paris and formally congratulated Washington on thesuccessful conclusion of the War of Independence. Numbered fortyseven on the reverse, this portrait is one of a series begun in1790 by Polk, who may have collaborated with his uncle on aprototype painted in 1788-1789. Other examples from this series arein the collections of the National Gallery of Art, WinterthurMuseum, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (see LindaCrocker Simmons, Charles Peale Polk, 1767-1822: A Limner and HisLikenesses (Washington D.C., 1981), pp. 4-5, 26-36). Charles Peale Polk was born in Maryland in 1767, the son of CaptainRobert Polk (1744-1777) and Charles Willson Peale's sister,Elizabeth Digby Peale (1747-c.1776). His mother died fromtuberculosis in about 1776 and a year later, his father was killedin battle. Orphaned at the age of ten, the young Polk was adoptedby his uncle, Charles Willson Peale, and, older than Peale'ssurviving children, became one of the famous artist's first familystudents. Polk practiced by emulating Peale's famous portraits andat the age of eighteen, first advertised on his own with thefollowing: The subscriber begs leave to inform the public that having finishedhis studies under the celebrated Mr. Peale of Philadelphia inPortrait Painting, he is now ready to exert himself to the utmostof his abilities in taking LIKENESSES in oil. -The Virginia Journal and Alexandria Advertiser, June 30, 1785,cited in Simmons, p. 4. In 1790, around the time he started his "Princeton" series, Polkwrote to Washington requesting a sitting to capture his likeness.While Washington often recorded such sittings in his diary, hisentries for 1790 are missing, so it is not known whether Polk everhad the opportunity to paint the President from life (Simmons, pp.4-5). After living in Philadelphia and Batimore, Polk lived inFrederick, Maryland and Washington D.C. where he became involved inpolitics and an ardent member of Thomas Jefferson's RepublicanParty. In 1820, he retired to Richmond County, Virginia where hedied in 1822 at the age of fifty five (Simmons, pp. 5-18). At the time of its sale in 1975, this portrait was noted to havebeen owned by George D. Krumbahaar of Philadelphia and Cazenovia,New York. George Douglas Krumbhaar (1837-1916) was the son of LewisKrumbhaar (1805-1885) and Sophia Ramsay (1808-1874). He resided inPhiladelphia where he married Susan Margaret Cooper (b. 1835) in1858 and the couple had three children, included Cornelia CooperKrumbhaar (b. 1869), who later inherited the portrait. According tothe Philadelphia City Directory of 1890, George Krumbhaar lived at2131 Walnut Street; he and his daughter were living in Cazenovia,New York by 1910, when they appear in that year's Federal Census.As indicated by a label on the reverse, the portrait was laterowned by the Boston dealers Doll and Richards. In 1971, in a letterto the Peale scholar Charles Coleman Sellers, Thomas E. Norton ofParke-Bernet Galleries notes that the portrait was owned at thattime by the Reid Estate in Purchase, New York (Charles ColemanSellers Collection, The American Philosophical Society, Ms Coll 3,Series IV, "Polk, C.P. Washington" folder). After its sale atauction in 1975, the portrait was acquired by the ClaneilFoundation, Inc., the consignor of the portrait at the time of itssale at Christie's in 1999.
Charles Peale Polk - Untitled

Charles Peale Polk - Untitled

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Lot number: 126
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Lot 126 Charles Peale Polk (1767-1822) portrait of mr. mccausland and daughter frances p. mccausland, baltimore, circa 179 Unsigned, oil on canvas, framed. H: 35 3/4 in. W: 28 3/4 in. (sight) PROVENANCE: Descended in the family of John Purviance Leigh, Jr. (1800-1865) of Norfolk, Virginia to the present owner. Little is known of the McCausland family but it is thought that they had ties to Baltimore and Pennsylvania. It is known that Frances P. McCausland married John F. Southgate of Baltimore in 1811 at the First Episcopal Church . They moved to Norfolk, VA where they had five children. Polk painted a companion portrait of Mrs. McCausland and son, that remains in private hands, see. fig. 92, pg 53 in catalog cited below. Exhibition and Literature: Charles Peale Polk (1776-1822) A Limner and His Likenesses, Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1981. Illustrated and discussed in catalog of same name by Linda Crocker Simmons (1981) Fig. 91, pg. 53. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Descriptions provided in both printed and on-line catalogue formats do not include condition reports. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging. Interested bidders are strongly encouraged to request a condition report on any lots upon which they intend to bid, prior to placing a bid. All transactions are governed by Freeman''s Conditions of Sale.
Charles Peale Polk - George Washington

Charles Peale Polk - George Washington

Original 1793
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Lot number: 107
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Charles Peale Polk (1767-1822) George Washington signed and dated 'CP Polk/pinx/1793' (lower right) oil on canvas 29¾ x 23 in. (75.6 x 58.4 cm.) Provenance Mr. George W. Crawford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Private collection, acquired from the above, circa 1960. By descent to the present owner. Lot Notes Born to Elizabeth Digby Peale and Robert Polk, Charles Peale Polk was the nephew of esteemed artists Charles Willson Peale and James Peale and a member of one of the most artistically acclaimed families of the eighteenth century. Orphaned at a young age, Polk was taken in by Charles Willson Peale. "In such an environment, it was unlikely that Polk could have had any ambition other than to become a painter. Charles was, indeed, one of his uncle's first pupils and learned from Peale the rudiments of technique and style as well as the accepted conventions of portrait painting." (L.C. Simmons in L.B. Miller, ed., The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870, New York, 1996, p. 250)
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