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Camille Pissarro

(1831 -  1903 ) Wikipedia® : Camille Pissarro
PISSARRO Camille Payage D'hiver

Sotheby's /Nov 15, 2016
635,093.45 - 816,548.72
Not Sold

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Variants on Artist's name :

Camille Pissarro

 

Artworks in Arcadja
1949

Some works of Camille Pissarro

Extracted between 1,949 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Camille Pissarro - Paysage, St Thomas

Camille Pissarro - Paysage, St Thomas

Original 1852
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Gross Price
Lot number: 130
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Description:
Description: CAMILLE PISSARRO (DANISH/FRENCH, 1830-1903) Paysage, St Thomas, (circa 1852) pencil on paper stamped with initials lower right 16.5 x 24.4 cm PROVENANCE The Estate of Camille Pissarro Stadia Graphics Gallery, Sydney, 1983 Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED Camille Pissarro, Stadia Graphics Gallery, Sydney, 6 September - 15 October, 1983, cat. no. 13 LITERATURE Stadia Graphics Gallery, Camille Pissarro, Sydney, 1983, (unpaginated) GST: Quantity: Symbol: Grade: Categories:
Camille Pissarro - Paysannes Au Marché De Gisors

Camille Pissarro - Paysannes Au Marché De Gisors

Original 1885
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Lot number: 1087
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Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) Paysannes au Marché de Gisors signed 'C. Pissarro.' (lower left) watercolor and black Conté crayon on paper 12 ¼ x 9 ½ in. (31.1 x 24.1 cm.) Executed circa 1885 Dr. Joachim Pissarro will include this work in his forthcoming Catalogue Raisonné of Drawings by Camille Pissarro.
Camille Pissarro - La Gare D'orléans, Saint-sever, Rouen

Camille Pissarro - La Gare D'orléans, Saint-sever, Rouen

Original 1896
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Lot number: 11B
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Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) La Gare d'Orléans, Saint-Sever, Rouen signed and dated 'C. Pissarro. 96' (lower left) oil on canvas 28 7/8 x 36 ¼ in. (73.3 x 92 cm.) Painted in Rouen, September 1896 “Imagine from my window the new quarter of Saint-Sever, just opposite, and the Orléans train station, brand new and shiny, and a pile of smokestacks, some huge, some tiny, with their arrogant air,” Pissarro wrote to his son Lucien from Rouen on 2 October 1896. “In the foreground boats and the water, to the left of the station the working-class district that runs all along the quays up to the iron bridge, the Pont Boïeldieu; it is morning with a fine misty sunlight. [One would be] an ignoramus to think that this is banal and down-to-earth, it is as beautiful as Venice, my dear, it has an extraordinary character and it is truly beautiful” (quoted in R. Brettell and J. Pissarro, op. cit., 1992, p. 6). The splendid urban vista that Pissarro described, with an effusiveness that is rare in his letters, is the exact view that he depicted in the present painting, one of the three largest that he brought back from a productive stay in Rouen from September to November 1896. A second, smaller canvas from this trip shows the same motif under foggier conditions (Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, no. 1143; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh). Pissarro painted the scene from the window of his second-floor room at the Hôtel d’’’’’’’’Angleterre, which boasted panoramic views over the modern working port of Rouen and the industrialized southern sector of the city. Turning his back on the picturesque motifs of the well-trodden medieval quarter, Pissarro sought inspiration in “traffic, carriages, pedestrians, workers on the quays, boats, smoke, mist in the distance”–so he wrote–“the whole scene fraught with animation and life” (J. Rewald, ed., Camille Pissarro: Letters to His Son Lucien, Boston, 2002, p. 283). Pissarro’’’’’’’’s trip to Rouen in the fall of 1896 was the second of three extended painting campaigns that he took to the thriving port city during the last years of the century. He had already worked there in January-March 1896, and he would return for a final time in July-October 1898. Over the course of these three visits, he produced a total of fifty interlocking cityscapes, his gaze sweeping left to right from the august Pont Corneille to the teeming dock area, that together constitute the first of the major urban serial endeavors of his final decade. “I have begun no less than a dozen pictures,” he reported within days of his arrival. “I have effects of fog and mist, of rain, of the setting sun and of grey weather, motifs of bridges seen from every angle...” (ibid., p. 282). To paint the present canvas, Pissarro looked almost due south across the Seine toward the newly constructed Gare d’’’’’’’’Orléans, the large building flanked by twin towers at the center of the scene, its facade softly illuminated by the morning sun. Visible at the far left are the last two arches of the Pont Boïeldieu, an iron span that had been opened in 1888 to replace an aging suspension bridge. The crossing leads to the place Carnot and the newly developed Saint-Sever district, with its jostling, grey-roofed houses. At the right of the painting is the truncated form of a large, red-brick building, the easternmost in a group of warehouses lining the wharves. Although it is early in the day, puffs of steam rise already from the tugboats and plumes of smoke from the factory chimneys, mingling with the light cloud cover to produce a delicately hued haze. Pissarro had numerous reasons for traveling to Rouen in 1896. After more than a decade painting at rural Eragny, he found himself increasingly “drawn to town subjects,” craving a new type of landscape. “I toil away,” he lamented, “without finding what I’’’’’’’’m looking for. Manifestly, meadow motifs lack that distance which gives so much charm to a landscape; it’’’’’’’’s too much of a fragment, too closed!” (quoted in Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, op. cit., 2005, p. 270). With his finances in a dismal state, moreover, he had persuaded Durand-Ruel to give him a solo exhibition in the spring, and he was eager to have convincingly modern material to show. He had worked in Rouen in 1883 and knew that it offered the pictorial energy that he sought; as an added incentive, he had recently cultivated a collector there, the industrialist Depeaux. Finally, there was the precedent of Monet, whose Rouen Cathedral series had deeply impressed Pissarro when it was exhibited in May 1895. “I find in this a superb unity,” he told Lucien, “that I have been seeking for so long” (quoted in R. Brettell and J. Pissarro, op. cit., 1992, p. xl). Upon his arrival at Rouen on 20 January 1896, he scouted the Hôtel d’’’’’’’’Angleterre but found it beyond his budget. He settled instead at the Hôtel de Paris, just on the other side of the Pont de Boïeldieu. Although the rooms there were so draughty that he shivered, the views were marvelous. By the time he headed home on March 30th, he had painted fifteen canvases, including three that depict the motif of the present painting from a different angle, looking southwest across the iron span toward the Gare d’’’’’’’’Orléans at the far right (Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, nos. 1116-1118; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Birmingham Museum; and Musée des Beaux-Arts, Rouen). When his exhibition opened at Durand-Ruel in mid-April, it was these brand-new views of Rouen that attracted the greatest acclaim. Félix Fénéon lauded “the clamor of an industrial town” as “a pretext for new wonders,” while François Thiébault-Sisson declared unequivocally, “The boldness has paid off” (quoted in Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, op. cit., 2005, pp. 267-268). Encouraged by this reception, and flush with the proceeds of several sales, Pissarro returned to Rouen on September 8th, splurging this time on the very same room at the Hôtel d’’’’’’’’Angleterre where Monet had stayed. From this vantage point, Pissarro was able to paint the Gare d’’’’’’’’Orléans head-on, removing the repoussoir of the near bank so that the bustling cityscape seems to float in the middle distance, a narrow band of brick and stone sandwiched between water and sky (compare Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, nos. 1227 and 1229 from 1898). Following Durand-Ruel’’’’’’’’s counsel to “make paintings with plenty of sunlight” on this return visit, “so that they’’’’’’’’re bright and luminous and sellable,” Pissarro focused in the present canvas on the effect of light breaking through the clouds, suffusing the scene in a gentle glow (quoted in ibid., p. 40). By Pissarro’’’’’’’’s own account, the fall campaign at Rouen was even more successful than the first one had been. “I just dispatched to Eragny fifteen pictures,” he wrote to Lucien on November 11th, “in which I tried to represent the movement, the life, the atmosphere of the harbor. I think that what I have done is bolder than what I did last year.” Durand-Ruel evidently agreed with the artist’’’’’’’’s assessment, eagerly purchasing eleven of the views the very next month, including the present Gare d’’’’’’’’Orléans; the dealer later sold this painting to the British novelist and cultural luminary William Somerset Maugham (Of Human Bondage), who owned it for nearly two decades before passing it to the Golden Age film producer Hal Wallis (Casablanca). “I had the luck to have boats with rose-colored, golden-yellow, and black masts,” Pissarro continued. “Perhaps I am deceiving myself for the motifs are fleeting, they don’’’’’’’’t last more than one, two, three days. At least I painted what I saw and felt...” (J. Rewald, op. cit., 2002, pp. 299-300).
Camille Pissarro - Payage D'hiver

Camille Pissarro - Payage D'hiver

Original 1876
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Lot number: 408
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Description:
Camille Pissarro PAYAGE D'HIVER (I) & BASSE-COUR AVEC POULES ET CANARDS (II) (A DOUBLE-SIDED WORK) 1830 - 1903 Signed C. Pissarro. and dated 1876 (lower right); signed C. Pissarro. and dated 1877 (on the reverse) Oil on canvas 15 by 18 1/8 in. 38 by 46 cm Painted in 1876 & 1877. Sale: Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May 6, 1932, lot 113 Galerie René Keller, Paris Galerie de l'Élysée, Paris Galerie Nathan, Zurich (acquired circa 1960) Private Collection, Germany (and sold: Christie's, New York, November 15, 1989, lot 357) Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Literature Ludovic-Rodo Pissarro & Lionello Venturi, Camille Pissarro: Son art, son oeuvre, vol. I, Paris, 1939, nos. 338 & 427; illustrated vol. II, pls. 67 & 86 Joachim Pissarro & Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, Pissarro, Catalogue critique des peintures, vol. II, Milan, 2005, nos. 433 & 500, illustrated pp. 316 & 353 Catalogue Note Camille Pissarro is an essential figure in French art history, and his contributions to the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements were widely celebrated during his lifetime. John Rewald characterized Pissarro as the "Dean of the Impressionist painters;" indeed, it was not only the elder artist’’’’’’’’s paintings but also his kind-hearted encouragement that inspired a legion of younger artists, among them Paul Cézanne. In 1866 Pissarro moved to Pontoise, in the northwestern suburbs of Paris. There he began the intensive exploration of the French countryside which would become the mainstay of his artistic output. Following a brief relocation to London during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870-71, the artist returned once more to the countryside with his young family, thereafter producing some of the most celebrated works of his entire oeuvre. Over the following decade Pissarro would capture the many intricacies and intimacies of rural life as the landscape and its people adapted to the changing seasons. Pissarro’’’’’’’’s paintings in and around Pontoise are also noted for their light brushwork and clean palette, marking the period during which the artist was at the apogee of his Impressionist style. It has been written: "The artist retains a firmly controlled geometric structure as the framework for his compositions, but he employs a lighter touch in his brushwork and a brighter palette, both of which show the influence of Monet, whose technique of freely applying broken, separate patches of pure pigment Pissarro approached closely at this time. The paintings dating from the opening years of the 1870s may, like those of Monet and Renoir, with good reason be described as the most purely Impressionist in Pissarro’’’’’’’’s entire oeuvre" (Pissarro (exhibition catalogue), Hayward Gallery, London, 1980, p. 79). Winter scenes were commonly painted by the Impressionists, the reflective quality of snow lending itself to their exploration of the splendorous effects of light and its colored shadows. Paysage d’’’’’’’’hiver depicts two local villagers collecting wood strewn across the dappled white land; a rolling valley and bare branches are illuminated by touches of pale color. Cézanne joined Pissarro in Pontoise in 1873 and together they painted their surroundings side by side. While the village lanes and houses were shared subjects, a notable difference was Pissarro’’’’’’’’s preference for the depiction of local villagers and workers in his paintings, frequently using their presence to animate his landscapes. Pissarro produced nearly one hundred known paintings depicting snow, of which Paysage d’’’’’’’’hiver is a very strong example. The harmonious colors and soft brushwork beautifully evoke a quiet morning as the thin light of winter enlivens a barren field. In the year following the completion of this composition, Pissarro painted his hens and ducks on the reverse of the canvas. He found infinite pleasure in his simple way of life outside of Paris with his wife and children, growing vegetables while raising birds and rabbits. The present work, comprising both recto and verso, is thus a magnificent ode to the artist’’’’’’’’s home and home life in and around Pontoise. See More See Less
Camille Pissarro - Paysanne Donnant À Manger À Un Enfant

Camille Pissarro - Paysanne Donnant À Manger À Un Enfant

Original 1874
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Gross Price
Lot number: 250
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Description:
Sale 2429 Lot 250 CAMILLE PISSARRO Paysanne donnant à manger à un enfant. Etching printed in dark brownish black, 1874. 125x121 mm; 4 7/8x4 3/4 inches, full margins. Fourth state (of 4). One of only 2 or 3 impressions in this state, from a total of approximately only 15 lifetime impressions in all four states combined. Inscribed "No. 1 Epreuve d'état" in pencil, lower left. A superb, evenly-printed impression of this extremely scarce, early etching. The dozen or so etchings Pissarro executed before Degas introduced him to more experimental printmaking techinques around 1879 are all of a more traditonal manner and style that recall prints from the 1860s by Barbizon painter-etchers such as Charles-François Daubigny, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot and, in this genre scene etching of a mother and child in an interior setting, Jean-François Millet. An impression of this subject in the first state once belonged to the French collector, Dr. Paul F. Gachet (and subsequently his son, P.L.L. Gachet), who treated Vincent van Gogh at Auvers-sur-Oise in 1890 (Pissarro had recommended Dr. Gachet to Van Gogh); it sold at Swann, March 7, 2013, sale 2306, lot 125. Pissarro added aquatint to the plate in the second state and progressively darkened the interior through the third and fourth (final) states, so that ultimately the glow from the fireplace at right illuminates the two figures and casts shadows on the floor and wall to the left. In this first state, the pure etching bears it's closest resemblance to Millet's etchings. Delteil 12
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