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Horace Pippin

United States (1888 -  1946 ) Wikipedia® : Horace Pippin
PIPPIN Horace Silhouetted Cityscape Scene In The Middle Of A Rainy Storm With Sunlight Barely Shining Through The Dark Clouds

888auctions
Nov 11, 2017
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Artworks in Arcadja
13

Some works of Horace Pippin

Extracted between 13 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Horace Pippin - Birmingham Meeting House In Spring

Horace Pippin - Birmingham Meeting House In Spring

Original 1940
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Lot number: 18
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BIRMINGHAM MEETING HOUSE IN SPRING Horace Pippin 1888 - 1946 inscribedFROM H. PIPPIN, 327 W. GAY ST/WEST CHESTER P.A.(on an original label affixed to the reverse) oil on canvasboard 17 5/8 by 23 7/8 inches (44.8 by 60.6 cm) Painted in 1940. We are grateful for the research conducted by Anne Monahan, author of the forthcoming publication,Horace Pippin, American Modern (Yale University Press, 2020). Provenance Carlen Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Curtin Winsor and Elizabeth Roosevelt Winsor, Rosemont, Pennsylvania, 1940 Carlen Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Acquired by the present owner from the above, by 1966 Exhibited Birmingham, Pennsylvania, Octagonal Schoolhouse, 250th Anniversary of the Birmingham Meeting,October 1940 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Art Alliance, Horace Pippin Memorial Exhibition, April-May 1947, no. 26, n.p. (asBirmingham Meeting House No. 3) Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Museum of Fine Art, Carnegie Institute; Washington, D.C., The Corcoran Gallery of Art,Three Self-Taught Pennsylvania Artists: Hicks, Kane, Pippin, October 1966-February 1967, illustrated p. 102 New York, ACA Galleries, Four American Primitives: Edward Hicks, John Kane, Anna Mary Robertson Moses, Horace Pippin, February-March 1972, no. 52, n.p., illustrated Washington, D.C., The Phillips Collection; New York, Terry Dintenfass Gallery; Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, Brandywine River Museum,Horace Pippin, February-September 1977, no. 26, illustrated n.p. Literature Daily Local News, October 8, 1940, Township Clippings Files, Birmingham Township Churches, Society of Friends—Orthodox, Chester County Historical Society, West Chester, Pennsylvania, n.p. Selden Rodman, Horace Pippin: A Negro Painter in America, New York, 1947, no. 56, p. 84 (as Birmingham Meeting House IV, 1942) Judith E. Stein,I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1993, pp. 84, 198, illustrated fig. 72, p. 91 (forthcoming) Anne Monahan,Horace Pippin, American Modern, New Haven, Connecticut, 2020, illustrated n.p. Catalogue Note We are grateful to Anne Monahan for preparing the following essay: Birmingham Meeting House in Spring is one of four paintings that Horace Pippincompleted in 1940-41 of a local landmark in Birmingham Township, Pennsylvania, about four miles from his home in West Chester. The site was built in 1763 by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), whose members colonized the state in the seventeenth century, and similar houses of worship are still in use across the region. As a wounded combat veteran of World War I, Pippin may have been sensitive to the meetinghouse\’s history as a battlefield hospital in the Revolutionary War. Even so, he almost certainly took up the subject at the invitation of Christian Brinton, who was organizing an exhibition to mark the 250th anniversary of the meeting founded by his ancestor. The invitation is unsurprising because Brinton and Pippin had been collaborating since 1937, when the curator organized the artist\’s first solo show in a move that burnished both their reputations. Pippin developed Birmingham Meeting House in Spring after selling the first and largest iteration (Birmingham Meeting House, Myron Kunin Collection of American Art, Eden Prairie, Minnesota) in January 1940 to Violette de Mazia, associate of the collector Albert C. Barnes, a key champion of Pippin. The artist debuted the new painting in Brinton\’s show in October as part of a day of festivities that attracted upwards of six hundred visitors to the site. News coverage named him, along with N.C. Wyeth, and Daniel Garber, among those with paintings of the building on view. He subsequently included Birmingham Meeting House in Late Summer (Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.) in his 1940 solo show in New York and planned a fourth treatment for his 1941 solo show in Philadelphia, which he eventually completed as Birmingham Meeting House in Summertime of 1941 (Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania) Much of this history has been effaced since Selden Rodman supplanted Pippin\’s seasonal titles with Birmingham Meeting House I–IV (1940-42) in his landmarkpublicationHorace Pippin: A Negro Painter in America of 1947, the first monograph devoted to an African American artist. That sequence imputes to the project a false coherence, establishes an erroneous order of production, and overstates the duration of Pippin\’s engagement with the theme. Pippin sold all four paintings quickly to prominent local collectors. Within days of the anniversary show, Curtin Winsor and his wife Elizabeth Roosevelt Winsor acquired Birmingham Meeting House in Spring with an enthusiasm typical of the Main Line elites who drove Pippin\’s market in the early 1940s. They almost certainly obtained it from his Philadelphia dealer in exchange for Portrait of My Wife(Private collection), one of two canvases they bought at the opening of Pippin\’s show in January.The painting was then in its current frame, which corresponds to those on other works by the artist.
Horace Pippin - Flowers

Horace Pippin - Flowers

Original 1946
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Lot number: 13
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Horace Pippin (1888-1946) Flowers oil on canvas 8 1/4 x 10in Painted in 1946. Footnotes Provenance The artist. Estate of the above. Carlen Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1946. Mr. and Mrs. David Flood, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, acquired from the above, 1946. By descent to the present owner. Literature S. Rodman, Horace Pippin: A Negro Painter in America, New York, 1947, p. 88, no. 120. J.E. Stein, I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1993, p. 203.
Horace Pippin - Holy Mountain

Horace Pippin - Holy Mountain

Original 1944
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Lot number: 28
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Horace Pippin HOLY MOUNTAIN, I 1888 - 1946 signedH. Pippin.and datedJune 6./1944. (lower right) oil oncanvas 30 1/2 by 36 inches (77.5 by 91.4 cm) Provenance The Downtown Gallery, New York The Encyclopædia BritannicaCollection, Chicago, Illinois, by 1945 The Downtown Gallery, New York Mrs. Galen Van Meter, Southport, Connecticut, by 1966 [With]Terry Dintenfass Gallery, New York Andrew Crispo Gallery, Inc., New York (sold: Sotheby's, New York, December 3, 1987, lot 339) Private collection(acquired at the above sale) Acquired by the present owner from the above Exhibited Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Museum of Fine Art, Carnegie Institute; Washington, D.C., The Corcoran Gallery of Art,Three Self-Taught Pennsylvania Artists: Hicks, Kane, Pippin, October 1966-February 1967, p. 108, illustrated New York, ACA Galleries,Four American Primitives: Hicks, Kane, Moses, Pippin, February-March 1972, no. 45, illustrated n.p. Washington, D.C., The Phillips Collection; New York, Terry Dintenfass Gallery; Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, Brandywine River Museum,Horace Pippin, February-September 1977, no. 37, illustrated n.p. Vienna, Austria, Art in Embassies Program,The Art Collection of the American Embassy, Vienna, 1983-1984, illustrated n.p. New York, Andrew Crispo Gallery, Inc.,Twentieth Century Americans, May-August 1982 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Chicago, Illinois, Art Institute of Chicago; Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Art Museum; Baltimore, Maryland, The Baltimore Museum of Art; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin, January 1994-April 1995, pp. 16, 82, 131, 132, 201, illustrated fig. 127, p. 131 Literature Grace Pagano, Contemporary American Painting: The Encyclopædia Britannica Collection, New York,1945,no. 87, illustrated n.p. Selden Rodman,Horace Pippin: A Negro Painter in America, New York, 1947, no. 76, p. 20, illustrated pl. XXXI Selden Rodman and Carole Cleaver,Horace Pippin: The Artist as a Black American, Garden City, New York, 1972, p. 14 David C. Driskell,The Other Side of Color, San Francisco, California, 2001, pp. 73, 82, illustrated pl. 41, p. 76 \“Pictures just come to my mind, and I tell my heart to go ahead.\” – Horace Pippin A self-taught painter from West Chester, Pennsylvania, Horace Pippin began producing art at age thirty-seven and became one of the foremost African American artists of the 20th century, celebrated for his singular aesthetic and distinctive vision of American life. In 1917 at the age of twenty-nine he enlisted in the National Guard and according to Pippin, World War I \“brought out the art in me\” (as quoted in Judith Stein, I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin, p. 3). Pippin kept an illustrated journal of his time spent in the French trenches and while only six of these drawings exist today, they foreshadow the imagery that would emerge in his later work. After fourteen months of service, Pippin was honorably discharged from the army after sustaining a crippling wound to his right shoulder. He moved back to West Chester with his new wife and began decorating cigar boxes with charcoal as therapy for his injured arm, which he couldn\’t raise above his head. Delighted by the new sense of purpose he felt, Pippin expanded his creative production and began working in other mediums, completing his first painting, The End of the War: Starting Home, in 1930. While his activities as an artist during this period were unknown beyond his immediate circle, by the end of the decade Pippin had gained national recognition for his paintings and in 1939 enrolled in art classes at the famed Barnes Foundation in Marion, Pennsylvania. The years between 1942 and 1944 are regarded as the most fruitful years of Pippin\’s career, a period that Selden Redman described as the artist\’s \“high tide\’ of integrating form and color\” (Ibid., p. 82). In the final years of World War II, Pippin produced his Holy Mountain series comprised of four works, although the final painting was never completed. Inspired by an Old Testament text, the series depicts the peaceable kingdom that is prophesied in the book of Isiah and epitomize the artist\’s spiritual temperament. Pippin grew up in the African Methodist Episcopal Church and his only familiarity with religious art would likely have come from the mass-produced chromolithographs that illustrated Bibles and church vestibules. While he explored biblical subject matter in only ten paintings, a relatively small number in comparison with his total oeuvre, many of these works, including the Holy Mountain series are considered to be some of the artist\’s best and most successful compositions. Dated June 6, 1944, Holy Mountain I is the first work Pippin created in this seminal series. The image recalls the Peaceable Kingdom picturesthatQuaker minister and artist Edward Hicks produced between 1820 and 1848, which Pippin would have undoubtedly been familiar with and of which at least sixty-two exist (Fig. 1). While Hicks interprets the messianic prophecy in the book of Isaiah quite literally, depicting a bucolic scene of Eden where all creatures exists in perfect harmony, Pippin tailors the subject to reflect both his personal experiences and the cultural climate of the period. A shepherd of African ancestry clad in a bright white robe standsat the center of the composition surrounded by a group of children and animals, both real and imaginary, organized within a lush landscape. The shepherd bears a striking resemblance to Pippin himself and has been understood by many scholars to be a self-portrait. Pippin contrasts the harmonic foreground with a threatening and ominous background where soldiers lurk in the forest adjacent to a military burial ground. In fact, the date of Holy Mountain I, June 6, 1944, corresponds with D-Day, a turning point in World War II when the Allied forces landed on the beaches of Normandy, a detail that reinforces the ideological dichotomy between war and peace even further. Of the present work, Horace Pippin wrote: "I do not know what to say in regards to my painting. Sometimes I think I'll never know painting for there is so much to know. Holy Mountain came to my mind because the whole world is in such trouble, and in reading the Bible (Isaiah XI:6) it says that there will be peace in the land. If a man knows nothing but hard times he will paint them, for he must be true to himself, but even that man may have a dream, an ideal—and Holy Mountain is my answer to such painting" (as quoted in Grace Pagano, Contemporary American Painting: The Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, New York, 1945, n.p.) Pippin has been likened to other African American artists of the period, including Jacob Lawrence and Romare Bearden who, like Pippin, were represented by The Downtown Gallery in the 1940s. While each of these artists has a distinct aesthetic, they are all celebrated for their depictions of African American culture and everyday life. In the catalogue introduction for Pippin\’s 1977 retrospective exhibition, Romare Bearden wrote, \“I met Horace Pippin on only one occasion. I was then thirty and he was about fifty-six. It was near the end of World War II, and Pippin had come to New York City… and had stopped by the Downtown Gallery to see Mrs. Edith Halpert, his New York dealer at the time…I recall a work of his in the gallery that I greatly admired in which the floor was painted flat as if it were, let us say, a wall. That the floor showed none of the recession of conventional perspective or the shadings and other attributes of exact representation didn\’t trouble me at all. I thought it was just fine that Pippin had the innate judgement not to become absorbed with academic procedures that were not in keeping with his own vision and artistic personality\” (Horace Pippin, Washington, D.C., 1976, n.p.). Appropriately, this skewed floor and distinctively modern perspective appears in some of Bearden\’s later works, including a collage titled The Woodshed from 1969 (Fig. 2). Indeed, throughout his career Pippin was less concerned with faithfully portraying his subjects and more focused on capturing a specific vision. He utilized the dynamic power and structural function of color to convey emotion, relying on subjects both conjured from memory and drawn from the world around him. While Pippin was never interested in taking his paintings beyond representation, his ideas about the expressive power of color foreshadow the work of color field painters such as Clyfford Still who pushed these ideas to full abstraction (Fig. 3). As Pippin succinctly summated his artistic process, \“Pictures just come to my mind, and I tell my heart to go ahead" (as quoted in Jen Bryant,A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin, New York, 2013, p. 6). Edward Hicks, Peaceable Kingdom, circa 1834, oil on canvas, 295/16 by 35½ inches (74.5 by 90.1 cm). National Gallery of Art, Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch. Edward Hicks, Peaceable Kingdom, circa 1834, oil on canvas, 295/16 by 35½ inches (74.5 by 90.1 cm). National Gallery of Art, Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch. Fig. 2 Romare Bearden, The Woodshed, 1969, cut and pasted printed and colored papers, photostats, cloth, graphite, and sprayed ink on Masonite, 40½ by 50½ inches (102.9 by 128.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, George A. hearn Fund, 1970. © 2018 Romare Bearden Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY Fig. 3 Clyfford Still, 1965 (PH-578), 1965, oil on canvas , 254 by 176.5 cm. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain. Courtesy Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza / Scala / Art Resource, NY © 2018 City & County of Denver, Courtesy Clyfford Still Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Horace Pippin - Cyclamen

Horace Pippin - Cyclamen

Original 1941
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Lot number: 109
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Horace Pippin CYCLAMEN 1888 - 1946 signedH. PIPPIN.(lower right) oil on canvasboard 7 5/8 by 10 inches (19.4 by 25.4 cm) Painted in 1941. Provenance Carlson Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The Downtown Gallery, New York Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Wickser, Buffalo, New York Private collection, Buffalo, New York By descent to the present owners Exhibited Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Chicago, Illinois, The Art Institute of Chicago; Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Art Museum; Baltimore, Maryland, The Baltimore Museum of Art; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin, January 1994-April 1995,no. 44, p.197, illustrated p. 114
Horace Pippin - Silhouetted Cityscape Scene In The Middle Of A Rainy Storm With Sunlight Barely Shining Through The Dark Clouds

Horace Pippin - Silhouetted Cityscape Scene In The Middle Of A Rainy Storm With Sunlight Barely Shining Through The Dark Clouds

Original
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Lot number: 88
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Description: This oil on canvas painting features a silhouetted cityscape scene in the middle of a rainy storm with sunlight barely shining through the dark clouds. The church steeple to the left is perhaps an ode to his themes of religion and the injustice of slavery and American segregation which features prominently in many of his other works more explicitly. The artist's signature is in the lower right corner and measures 8 inches x 10 inches
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