Fred Pansing

(18541912 ) - Artworks
PANSING Fred Gaff-rigged Boat At Sunset

Eldred's /Jul 23, 2009
352.34 - 493.27
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
45

Some works of Fred Pansing

Extracted between 45 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Fred Pansing - Portrait Of The  
U.s.s. Rhode Island

Fred Pansing - Portrait Of The U.s.s. Rhode Island

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Lot number: 523
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Description:
Lot 523 Fred Pansing (New Jersey, 1844-1912) Portrait of the U.S.S. Rhode Island (B.B.-17). Signed l.r., vessel identified on a plaque below. Oil on paperboard, 7 x 10 in., in a later molded giltwood frame. Condition: Scattered retouch to lower edge. Note: The U.S.S. Rhode Island (B.B.-17) was built by the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts. She was a Virginia-class battleship of the United States Navy, the second ship to carry her name, and was commissioned on February 19, 1906, with Captain Perry Garst in command. Estimate $2,500-3,500 Numerous minute spots of retouch to vessel and background, and along edges.
Fred Pansing - The Fall River Line Dayliner

Fred Pansing - The Fall River Line Dayliner

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Lot number: 3106
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Fred Pansing (American, 1844-1912) The Fall River Line dayliner Priscilla signed lower left: "Fred Pansing" watercolor on artist's board heightened with gouache andpastel 17 x 36 in. (43.1 x 91.4 cm.) Footnote: The Old Colony steamboat Priscilla, the latest addition tothe Sound fleet was brought into service in 1894. The 426 ft. Priscilla was the largest side wheeler (with water wheelsand feathering buckets, double-inclined compount engine, 95-inchcylinders and 11 ft. stoke), with Captain A.G. Simmons in command aveteran of the coastal service. The Priscilla carried 1500passengers and was often booked to capacity with prompt servicebetween New York, Newport, Fall River and Boston. She was fittedwith the finest equipment and fine cuisine that would satisfy herprosperous clientele; she would become one of the matriarchs of theFall River Line, she was broken up in 1937. PROVENANCE: Collection of Arthur H. Fletcher of the W.A. Fletcher CompanyHoboken, NJ Jesse L. Fletcher, and thence to the Steamship Historical Society of America.
Fred Pansing - The S.s. "kaiserin Auguste Victoria"

Fred Pansing - The S.s. "kaiserin Auguste Victoria"

Original 1907
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Lot number: 153
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(n/a) Fred Pansing (American, 1844-1912) The S.S. "Kaiserin Auguste Victoria" signed and dated 'Fred Pansing Sept 1907' (lower left) andinscribed 'Hamburg American Line' (lower right) oil on canvas 36 x 72 in. (91.4 x 182.8 cm.) Footnote: The S.S. "Kaiserin Auguste Victoria" was built in 1905 at Stettinby A.G. Vulcan for the Hamburg America Line. Originally laid downas the S.S. "Europa" she was renamed "Kaiserin Auguste Victoria"prior to her launching for the Hamburg America Line. At the time ofher launching she was the largest ship in the world. She had atonnage of 24.581 gross tons, and her principal dimensions wereLOA: 677.5 feet, Beam: 77.3 feet, and holds that were 50.2 feetdeep. She had two funnels, and rigged with four masts (as aschooner) and twin screws. Her maiden voyage was on 10 May 1906from Hamburg via Dover and Cherbourg to New York. During the GreatWar, the Kaiserin Auguste Victoria was laid up in the port ofHamburg, and then in March 1919, she was surrendered to Britain,who then chartered her to the U.S. Shipping Board. The U.S.S."Kaiserin Auguste Victoria" carried American troops from Europe toAmerica and made five crossings between France and the UnitedStates, bringing troops back from the war. On 14 February 1920, theship was decommissioned and then chartered to Cunard, sailingbetween Liverpool and New York. On 13 May 1921, the ship was soldto Canadian Pacific; and re-named the "Empress of Scotland". Thenew Empress was refitted to carry 459 first-class passengers, 478second-class passengers and 960 third-class passengers. At the sametime she was converted to oil fuel. On 22 January 1922, the Empressof Scotland embarked on her first voyage from Southampton to NewYork. On 22 April 1922, she made her second trans-Atlantic voyage,sailing the Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebec route. On 14 June 1922 sheswitched routes to the Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebecservice. In 1926, the Empress was refitted again, this time withaccommodations for first-class, second-class, tourist-class andthird-class passengers. In 1927, another refit resulted infirst-class, tourist-class, and third-class accommodations. On 11October 1930, the Empress of Scotland made her last voyage fromSouthampton to Cherbourg and Quebec. When the new Empress ofBritain came into service, the once-grand vessel was sold forscrap. The ship was gutted by fire and sank actually breaking intwo at the ship-breakers yard at Blyth; Later the yard raised thehull of the Empress both pieces were then scrapped.
Fred Pansing - Gaff-rigged Boat At Sunset

Fred Pansing - Gaff-rigged Boat At Sunset

Original
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Lot number: 328
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Description:
FRED PANSING American, 1844-1912 Gaff-rigged boat at sunset. Signed lower left Fred Pansing". Private collection, Duxbury, MA . Oil on canvas, 14" x 10". Unframed." CONDITION: Heavy craqueleur. Two small spots of paint loss to the left of the bow and three small spots of paint loss to edges. Heavy surface dirt and grime.
Fred Pansing - The Cunard Liner 
R.m.s. Umbria

Fred Pansing - The Cunard Liner R.m.s. Umbria

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Lot number: 94
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Description:
Fred Pansing (American, 1844-1926) The Cunard Liner R.M.S. Umbria off Brooklyn Heights, on theEast River, New York inscribed 'Major & Knapp Co./N.Y./1885' (lower right) oil on canvas 31 x 62 in. (78.7 x 157.5 cm.) The canvas bears the inscription of Major & Knapp, a well-knownNew York publisher of maritime and other lithographs. Fred Pansingwas one of their prodigies, and in addition to his depictions ofAmerican Steamers, they also published prints of varioustrans-Atlantic liners by the artist. In some respects, it must besaid that the quality of the painting surpasses that of hisordinary ship portraits. However, this could well be accounted forby the stimulus of an unusually large, and very special commissionof this nature. Provenance with Smith Gallery, New York, New York Lot Notes UMBRIA and her sister ETRURIA were the very last North Atlanticexpress steamers to be fitted with compound engines and almost thelast with single screws. Both were built for Cunard by John Elderand Co. on the Clyde and the two sisters were identical in everyrespect. Each was registered at 7, 718 gross tons, measured 501feet in length, with a 57 foot beam and was designed to steam at 19knots. Their design also provided for them to be converted to ArmedMerchant Cruisers in a national emergency, and they were furtherrequired to be able to maintain 18 knots for sixteen days.Completion of this pair of ships gave Cunard the best-balanced mailfleet on the Atlantic and, in one author's view, "no trans-Atlanticvessels have been more successful than these, the most powerfulsingle-screw ships ever built." (Commander C.R. Vernon-Gibbs,Passenger Liners of the Western Ocean, 1952). UMBRIA was launched on 26 June 1884 and on her trials, during whichshe traveled light, she astonished all observers by effortlesslyachieving 21 knots instead of her designed maximum of 19. ClearingLiverpool on 1 November, 1884 for her maiden voyage to New York shemade an excellent passage even thought she took longer to settleinto her stride than did her sister ETRURIA. Thus, it was not untilMay 1887 that she took the "Blue Riband" for the fastest west-boundcrossing, and then the following year for the east-bound journey.Between 1889 and 1891, the outward crossing times were steadilyimproved by both sisters and, in fact, all-round speeds continuedto increase slightly as they grew older. Excessive vibration andpropeller shaft problems were only to be expected in single-screwvessels of such power, and UMBRIA was disabled by shaft breakagesin 1892 and again in 1893. Briefly chartered as a troop transportduring the Boer War in 1900, UMBRIA remained extremely popular andin continuous service until laid up in 1908. She came out ofreserve for three winter voyages (1909-10), but by then she wasquite outclassed by the new generation of four-funneled leviathansand was broken up in 1910.
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