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Thomas Moran

United States (1837 -  1926 ) Wikipedia® : Thomas Moran
MORAN Thomas Sunset On Long Island

Sotheby's /May 23, 2017
449,276.66 - 628,987.33
546,166.25

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Variants on Artist's name :

Thomas Moran

 

Artworks in Arcadja
309

Some works of Thomas Moran

Extracted between 309 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Thomas Moran - Mount Of The Holy Cross

Thomas Moran - Mount Of The Holy Cross

Original
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Lot number: 843
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Description:
843 After Thomas Moran (American, 1837-1926) Mount of the Holy Cross, late 19th century, unsigned, oil on canvas, 17 x 14 in.; possibly original gilt wood frame, 20-3/4 x 17-3/4 in. Provenance: The Collection of Dr. Robert Feinberg, Tennessee Condition: areas of retouch, two patches verso, scattered minimal retouch, grime; frame with abrasions
Thomas Moran - Grand Canyon, Hermit Rim

Thomas Moran - Grand Canyon, Hermit Rim

Original 1912
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Lot number: 61613
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Description: Thomas Moran (American, 1837-1926) Grand Canyon, Hermit Rim, 1912 Chromolithograph 26 x 36 inches (66.0 x 91.4 cm) (sheet) Signed and dated in plate Published by Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railway System 1912-1913 PROVENANCE: William A. Karges Fine Art, Carmel, California; Acquired by the present owner from the above. HID04901242017
Thomas Moran - Laguna, New Mexico From The East

Thomas Moran - Laguna, New Mexico From The East

Original 1892
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Lot number: 186
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Description:
Moran, Thomas (United States, 1837-1926). "Laguna, New Mexico from the East." June 16, 1892. Watercolor on paper. Signed, titled, and dated l.l. 9 3/4"h x 12 5/8." Matted and framed under glass: 16 1/4" x 18 3/4". Provenance: The Estate of David Lamb. Old gallery label on back from Guld Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, New York. "The Moran Family Legacy" October 25, 1997-January 11, 1998. Condition: 1 3/8"l damage above signature. Glue strings / marks on bottom. Laid down to paper backing board.
Thomas Moran - Sunset On Long Island

Thomas Moran - Sunset On Long Island

Original
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Lot number: 69
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Thomas Moran SUNSET ON LONG ISLAND 1837 - 1926 signed TMoran, N.A. and dated 1901 (lower right) oil on canvas 30 by 40 1/4 inches (76.2 by 102.2 cm) This painting will be included in Stephen L. Good's and Phyllis Braff's forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist's work. Hammer Galleries, New York Private collection (sold: Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, December 6, 1984, lot 73, illustrated) Alexander Gallery, New York (acquired at the above sale) Acquired by the present owner from the above Exhibited East Hampton, New York, Guild Hall, The Moran Family Legacy, October 1997-January 1998 Literature William Gerdts, "The Paintings of Thomas Moran: Source and Style," The Magazine Antiques, vol. 84, no. 2, February 1964, p. 204, illustrated  Catalogue Note Thomas Moran designed and built a home and studio in East Hampton, New York, in 1884. East Hampton became his permanent residence thereafter and Moran often painted the scenic landscape at the eastern end of Long Island. In a letter discussing the present work, The artist wrote: "The subject was taken from a pond near the Village of Water Mill about ten miles from Easthampton, Long Island, my summer home (and) studio. It is eminently characteristic of the scenes at the far end of the island, (and) I esteem it among the best of my works."  According to Phyllis Braff, \\\“Moran\\\’s reputation as a painter of resonant, luminous effects can be linked, in part, to the atmospheric conditions he included in his paintings of this region. The area\\\’s low terrain adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean provided an opportunity for the artist to add dramatic, water-enhanced reflections for compositions with large unbroken skies." Of the Long Island paintings, Braff continues, saying, \\\“In his concerns with observing the time of day, or the seasons, he often implies symbolic readings for these themes. Moran had begun to address the challenge of translating atmospheric characteristics of art into pigment early in his early career."  Executed in 1901, Sunset on Long Island is one of several paintings that illustrate Moran\\\’s interest in natural phenomena. The changing color of the sky at sunset, from fiery orange to violet, contrasts with the deep greens and browns of the vegetation, and is further emphasized by the sky\\\’s reflection in the water. In Sunset on Long Island, sky, water, and land intersect, offering a glimpse into the unspoiled and romantic scenery of Long Island 69 Thomas Moran signed TMoran, N.A. and dated 1901 (lower right) oil on canvas 30 by 40 1/4 inches (76.2 by 102.2 cm) This work is in good condition. The canvas is wax lined. Under UV: there are small areas of inpainting at the upper left edge and in the lower center sky. There are a few other scattered dots and thin lines of inpainting. In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.
Thomas Moran - Mountain Lion In Grand Canyon

Thomas Moran - Mountain Lion In Grand Canyon

Original 1914
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Lot number: 68017
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Thomas Moran (American, 1837-1926) Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon (Lair of the Mountain Lion), 1914 Oil on canvas 30 x 25 inches (76.2 x 63.5 cm) Signed and dated lower right: TMoran. / 1914 PROVENANCE: The artist; Osborne Co., Clifton, New Jersey, 1915; William Thomas Gilcrease, Tulsa, Oklahoma; Des Cygne Gilcrease Denney, San Antonio, Texas, gift from the above; Corwin D. Denney, Palm Springs, California, by descent from the above, 1968; By descent to the present owner. EXHIBITED: Palm Springs Art Museum (known as the Palm Springs Desert Museum until 2005), Palm Springs, California, "The West as Art: Changing Perceptions of Western Art in California Collections," February 23-May 30, 1982 (as Mountain Lion of Yellowstone). LITERATURE: J. Wilson, "The Significance of Thomas Moran as an American Landscape Painter," Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 1955, pp. 115, 290-91; T. Wilkins, Thomas Moran, Artist of the Mountains, Norman, Oklahoma, 1966, p. 237; N. Anderson et al., Thomas Moran, New Haven, Connecticut, 1997, p. 274. Thomas Moran continues to hold the title of visual architect of the dramatic Western landscape, which captured the imagination of America at the turn of the century and helped inspire the creation of the National Park System. During the 1910s, Moran revisited his favorite subjects from prior decades, including Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion, and especially the Grand Canyon. A masterwork from 1914, Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon epitomizes Moran's technique of romanticizing landscape elements in order to evoke the sublimity of nature. Here, dual sentinels--a purplish peak on the left and intertwined pines on the right--tower above a mountain lion's lair. The mountain lion, a rare instance of wildlife in a Moran painting, embodies the delicate mix of beauty, danger, and possibility, which defined the period's vision of the unique character of the American West. Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon is the visual analogue of guidebook texts, published by the transcontinental railroad to promote tourist travel to the newly opened parks: "Not the most fervid pictures of a poet's fancy could transcend the glories then revealed in the depths of the Canon; inky shadows, pale gildings of lofty spires, golden splendors of sun beating full on facades of red and yellow, obscurations of distant peaks by veils of transient shower, glimpses of white towers half drowned in purple haze, suffusions of rosy light blended in reflection from a hundred tinted walls. Caught up to emotional heights the beholder becomes unmindful of fatigue. He mounts on wings. He drives the chariot of the sun." (C.A. Higgins, "A Grand Canon of the Colorado River," Passenger Department Santa Fe Route, Chicago, 1897, p. 18). Moran first encountered the majesty of the Grand Canyon in 1873 while accompanying Major John Wesley Powell on his expedition through the Rocky Mountain region. Under the auspices of the Santa Fe Railroad, the artist returned to the site in 1892 and wintered there annually until 1920, with his daughter, Ruth, becoming a fixture at the famous El Tovar Hotel. Art historian Nancy Anderson explains Moran's attachment to the Grand Canyon: "In exchange for rail passes and hotel accommodations, Moran produced paintings of the canyon that were used as promotional tools in hotels, offices, and railroad cars. Additional images were distributed on calendars, in guidebooks and brochures, even on stationery. Eventually Moran became so closely identified with the canyon that the railroad used his picture in advertisements" (N. Anderson, Thomas Moran, New Haven, 1997, p. 164). Generous with his success, Moran enjoined fellow artists to paint the Grand Canyon as an award-winning subject and as a tool for marketing the rare splendor of the American landscape: "My chief desire is to call the attention of . . . painters to the unlimited field for the exercise of their talents to be found in this enchanting Southwestern country; a country flooded with color and picturesqueness, offering everything to inspire the artist, and stimulate him to the production of works of lasting interest and value. This Grand Canyon of Arizona, and all the country surrounding it, offers a new and comparatively untrodden field for pictorial interpretation, and only awaits the men of original thoughts and ideas to prove to their countrymen that we possess and land of beauty and grandeur with which no other can compare" (T. Moran, quoted in N. Spalding Stevens, "A Pilgrimage to the Artist's Paradise," The Fine Arts Journal, February 1911, p. 112). Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon, reproduced as a large-scale color print by Osborne & Co. in 1915, also points to the role of the commercial arts in Moran's career. Indeed, "too often overshadowed by his painting in art historical literature, commercial work was a primary means of economic support for Moran through most of his life. In the artist's own opinion and in that of many of his contemporaries, it comprised an important vehicle for his talent and vision. Commissions for illustrations provided him occasions for travel and artistic inspiration, and in many cases the resulting wood engravings formed the basis for more monumental work. . . . His commercial art brought him into contact with some of the most influential individuals and corporations of his time, which in turn contributed to his success as a fine artist in the grand tradition" (Anderson, p. 321). By the 1890s, publishers were using chromolithography, letterpress, and offset lithography to popularize Moran's work through travel guides, calendars, ink blotters, and other collectibles. Entrepreneurial, the artist began selling copyrights of original artwork for $500. A publishing consortium that Moran partnered with frequently at the turn of the century was Osborne and Murphy, founded in 1888 in Red Oak, Iowa. Newspaper editors Edmund B. Osborne and Thomas D. Murphy brilliantly conceived of art calendars, coupled with advertisements for local businesses, as a tool to increase subscriptions. In 1895 the partners split into separate entities, and Osborne & Co. moved to Allwood, New Jersey. Both companies commissioned paintings and bought copyrights from Moran for their promotional calendars and color prints. Moran's ledgers indicate that Osborne & Co. purchased the original painting Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon (The Lair of the Mountain Lion) in January 1915 for $1,100, as well as the copyright, enabling the reproduction of the painting as a color print. The provenance of Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon, tracing back to the incomparable Western art collector Thomas Gilcrease, further underscores its importance within Moran's oeuvre. Although Gilcrease donated the majority of his collection to his eponymous museum in Tulsa, he kept this painting for himself, ultimately gifting it to his daughter, Des Cygne. The painting has remained in the family of Des Cygne's husband, the late Corwin D. Denney, a Gilcrease Museum board member and philanthropist in his own right. With its distinguished history and subject, Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon stands as one of Moran's greatest late works. This painting will be included in Stephen L. Good and Phyllis Braff's forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist's works. HID04901242017
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