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Henry Moore

United Kingdom (Castleford 1898 -  Munch Hadham 1986 ) Wikipedia® : Henry Moore
MOORE Henry Working Model For Reclining Figure: Bone Skirt

Christie's
Jun 20, 2018
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Henry Moore at auctions worldwide.
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Variants on Artist's name :

Henry Moore O.M.

Henry Spencer Moore

 

Artworks in Arcadja
5376

Some works of Henry Moore

Extracted between 5,376 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Henry Moore - Textile Design: Standing Figures

Henry Moore - Textile Design: Standing Figures

Original 1943
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Lot number: 197
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Description:
Henry Moore (1898-1986) Textile Design: Standing Figures signed and dated 'Moore 52' (lower right) watercolour, wax crayon and gouache on paper 7 x 9 7/8 in. (18.2 x 25.3 cm.) Executed circa 1943 Provenance Ezio Gribaudo, Turin, by 1971. Acquired from the above in the 1970s; sale, Sotheby's, London, 20 October 2004, lot 286. Private collection, Greece. Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2016.
Henry Moore - Two Reclining Figures

Henry Moore - Two Reclining Figures

Original 1966
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Lot number: 404
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Henry Moore TWO RECLINING FIGURES 1898 - 1986 signed Moore and dated 66at a later date (lower right) felt-tip and pen and ink on paper 29.3 by 24cm., 11 1/2 by 9 1/2 in. Executed in 1966. This work is recorded in the database of The Henry Moore Foundation under no. 3151. Sale: Farsettiarte, Milan, 28th November 2014, lot 361 Purchased at the above sale by the present owner Literature Anne Garrould (ed.), Henry Moore Complete Drawings 1950-76, Much Hadham, 2003, no. AG 66.38, illustrated p. 183
Henry Moore - Working Model For Reclining Figure: Bone Skirt

Henry Moore - Working Model For Reclining Figure: Bone Skirt

Original 1977-1979
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Lot number: 33
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Description:
Henry Moore (1898-1986) Working Model for Reclining Figure: Bone Skirt signed and numbered \‘Moore 1/9\’ (on the top of the base) bronze with dark brown patina with green undertones Length: 27 1/8 in. (68.9 cm.) Conceived in 1977-1979 and cast in an edition of nine Provenance Lauren Bacall, New York, by whom acquired directly from the artist in October 1979, and thence by descent; sale, Bonhams, New York, 4 November 2014, lot 58. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.
Henry Moore - Ideas For Sculpture

Henry Moore - Ideas For Sculpture

Original 1938
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Lot number: 176
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Description:
Henry Moore, O.M., C.H. (1898-1986) Ideas for Sculpture signed and dated 'Moore/38' (lower right) chalk, crayon and wash on buff paper 19½ x 14½ in. (49.5 x 36.8 cm.) Provenance with Felix Landau Gallery, Los Angeles. Harry Pack. with Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 1975. Private collection. Literature C. Valentin, Henry Moore, London, 1949, no. 140. R. Melville, Henry Moore: Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, London, 1970, p. 17, no. 183, pl. 18. Exhibition catalogue, 80/80, London, Thomas Gibson Fine Art, 1978, p. 12, exhibition not numbered, illustrated. A. Garould (ed.), Henry Moore, Complete Drawings: 1930-39, Vol. 2, London, 1988, p. 208, no. AG 38.36, HMF 1369, illustrated. Exhibited London, Marlborough Fine Art, 19th & 20th Century Drawings, Watercolours and Sculptures, February - March 1961, no. 64. Los Angeles, County Museum, Henry Moore in Southern California, October - November 1973, ex-catalogue. London, Thomas Gibson Fine Art, 80/80, July 1978, exhibition not numbered. \‘I find myself lined up with the surrealists because Surrealism means freedom for the creative side of man, for surprise & discovery & life, for an opening out & widening of man\’s consciousness, for changing life & against conserving warn out traditions, for a variety not a uniformity, for opening not closing\’ (H. Moore, 1937, quoted in A.G. Wilkinson, Henry Moore: Writings and Conversations, Aldershot, 2002, p. 123). Although made with the intent of being the preliminary stage of the ultimate goal of sculpture, Moore's drawings are more than just the formation of technical ideas, but meticulously rendered pictures. Ideas for a Sculpture is an eerie depiction of two groupings of forms, completely surreal, and yet presented as if Moore were sketching from life. They occupy a realistic space in relation to one another and react to light, casting shadow as if they were material. On the right, the closely grouped pair of standing forms create the appearance of a private conversation and divide the image into two sides. The scene is presented with an upright composition as if it were a portrait, favouring the right hand forms. On the left a stringed form lies low to the ground, referencing the stringed sculptures that Moore was creating in the late 1930s. This is an idea rather than an extensive study and was not necessarily forged in three dimensions, but was a sketch for future works. This picture was created with the purpose of imagining non-existent objects in three dimensions with realistic rendering. These studies demonstrate Moore\’s influence of the Surrealists, such as Miró and Dalí. Like Moore, they were fascinated with the narrative of Metamorphosis, which starts with the bones of Mother Earth being replanted into the ground where they would become people, a tale which bears a direct correlation to Moore\’s sculpture, particularly in his large-scale abstract human figures, forged from stone. Furthermore, there is a definite influence from Picasso\’s An Anatomy: Three Women, 1933 (Musée Picasso, Paris), where forms have been fragmented and reconstructed. It is highly likely that Moore saw reproductions of the drawings in the popular French periodical Minotaure, where they were published and distributed. They demonstrate a similar composite form although are more clearly represented as figures, with identifiable versions of eyes and legs. There are a wide range of examples of the different styles of Moore\’s drawing. A body of his studies on paper have a taxonomic nature in the repetitious studies of objects such as bones and developing ideas for sculptural forms to highly rendered pencil drawings to describe light and shade. These are all elements that would be borrowed in Moore\’s Surrealist composite designs as they metamorphose into unreal forms, which unsettle with their disquieting stillness. The looming figures have been linked to the threat of war in Europe at this time; \‘alarming but also ludicrous\’, they intimidate whilst remaining dormant (see Andrew Causey, The Drawings of Henry Moore, London, 2010, pp. 88-91).
Henry Moore - Rocking Chair No. 4: Miniature

Henry Moore - Rocking Chair No. 4: Miniature

Original 1950
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Gross Price
Lot number: 6
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Description:
ROCKING CHAIR NO. 4: MINIATURE Henry Moore 1898 - 1986 bronze height: 15cm. 5 7/8 in. Conceived in 1950 and cast in bronze in an edition of 9 plus 1 artist\’s proof. Private Collection, Canada Osborne Samuel, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in March 2015 Exhibited London, Osborne Samuel, Henry Moore, 2015, illustrated in colour in the catalogue Literature Alan Bowness (ed.),Henry Moore, Complete Sculpture, London, 1955, vol. II, no. 277, another cast illustrated p. 28 & pl. 17 David Mitchinson (ed.),Henry Moore Sculpture, London, 1981, no. 200, another cast illustrated p. 105 William S. Lieberman, Henry Moore, 60 Years of His Art, New York & London, 1983, another cast illustrated p. 80 John Hedgecoe,Henry Moore: A Monumental Vision, Cologne, 2005, no. 263, another cast illustrated p. 213 'The rocking chair sculptures were done for my daughter Mary, as toys which actually rock. I discovered while doing them that the speed of the rocking depended on the curvature of the base and the disposition of the weights and balances of the sculpture, so each of them rocks at a different speed' (Henry Moore, quoted inJ. Hedgecoe & H. Moore,Henry Moore, London 1968, p. 178). The small group of bronzes on the theme of the rocking chair that Moore executed in1950-52 arethe artist's only kinetic sculptures.Whilst theyhave their immediatebeginningin the idea of making a sculpture with movement for his young daughter, their origin goes further back, to the 'family group' sculptures of the immediate post-war period and the earliest mother and child subjectswhich Moore had produced around 1930. Eachbronze from this group offers a slightly different rendering of thetheme,however they all share the sense of intimacy between the mother and her child. InRocking Chair No. 4, thecombination of the formal sculptural concerns of weight and balance are held in perfect counterpoint to the joy of the subject, the mother lifting her child up high.Whilst the child is rendered in a relatively naturalistic, if simplified,style, the mother figure and the chair are much more schematised in a manner reminiscent of Moore's work produced in the 1930s.Although the mother and child theme was one that was an absolute bedrock of Moore's work, the intimacy of the two figuresis very much an echo of that found in the drawings of the early to mid-1940s that seehim exploring thisrelationship in thelight of the commission for a large carvedMadonna and Childfor St. Matthew's Church inNorthampton.
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