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Claude Monet

France (1840 -  1926 ) Wikipedia® : Claude Monet
MONET Claude Chemin Creux, Effet De Lumière

Sotheby's /Nov 6, 2015
185,446.18 - 259,624.66
528,367.00

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Artworks in Arcadja
723

Some works of Claude Monet

Extracted between 723 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Claude Monet - Michel Monet Et Jean-pierre Hoschedé Se Tenant Par L'épaule

Claude Monet - Michel Monet Et Jean-pierre Hoschedé Se Tenant Par L'épaule

Original 1886
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Lot number: 195
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Claude Monet 1840 - 1926 MICHEL MONET ET JEAN-PIERRE HOSCHEDÉ SE TENANT PAR L'ÉPAULE charcoal on canvas 73.3 by 60cm., 28 3/4 by 24in. Drawn circa 1886. Provenance Michel Monet, Giverny Private Collection (by descent from the above) Acquired by the present owner in 1996 Literature William C. Seitz, Claude Monet, New York, 1960, no. 80, illustrated n.p. Yvon Taillandier, Claude Monet, Paris, 1963, illustrated p. 21 Mitsuhiko Kuroe, L'Art moderne du monde: Claude Monet, Tokyo, 1970, ilustrated p. 91 M. Shuji Takashina, Claude Monet, Tokyo, 1981, illustrated p. 107 Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet, Catalogue raisonné, Supplément aux peintures, dessins, pastels, Lausanne, 1991, vol. V, no. D440, illustrated p. 129
Claude Monet - Un Moulin À Zaandam

Claude Monet - Un Moulin À Zaandam

Original 1871
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Lot number: 16
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Claude Monet 1840 - 1926 UN MOULIN À ZAANDAM signed Claude Monet (lower left) oil on canvas 50 by 75cm. 19 3/4 by 29 1/2 in. Painted in 1871. Provenance Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris (acquired from the artist in March 1872) François Depeaux, Rouen (acquired from the above on 26th June 1894. Sold: Georges Petit, Paris, 1st June 1906, lot 25) Paul Rosenberg, Galerie Bernheim-Jeune & Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris (jointly purchased at the above sale) Durand-Ruel Gallery, New York (acquired in 1913) M. Knoedler & Co., New York (acquired from the above on 17th January 1930) Paul Cassirer, Berlin Alex. Reid & Lefevre, London (acquired from the above in 1930) The 1st Viscount Radcliffe, Hampton Lucy, Warwickshire (acquired from the above on 29th November 1937) Alex. Reid & Lefevre, London The 9th Earl of Jersey, Jersey (acquired from the above on 12th May 1943) Private Collection, United Kingdom (by descent from the above. Sold: Sotheby's, London, 5th February 2013, lot 15) Purchased at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited The Hague, Haagsche Kunstring, Cercle Artistique, 1893 Berlin, Paul Cassirer, XI. Jahrgang VI. Ausstellung, 1909, no. 7 Frankfurt, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Die klassische Malerei Frankreichs im 19. Jahrhundert, 1912, no. 77 Chicago, Auditorium Hotel, Tableaux Durand-Ruel, 1915 Saint-Louis, Noonan-Kocian Art Gallery, Tableaux Durand-Ruel, 1925 New York, Durand-Ruel Gallery, Rétrospective Cl. Monet, 1927, no. 2 Philadelphia, The Art Club, Memorial Exhibition of the Works of Cl. Monet, 1927, no. 2 Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, Vincent van Gogh en Zijn Tijdgenooten, 1930, no. 219 Glasgow, Royal Glasgow Institute, 1933, no. 383 London, Alex. Reid & Lefevre, French Painting of the 19th Century: Ingres to Cézanne, 1933, no. 26 (as dating from 1870) Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada; Toronto, Art Gallery & Montreal, Montreal Art Association, French Painting in the 19th Century, 1934, no. 77 Glasgow, Alex. Reid & Lefevre, French Art of the 19th and 20th Centuries, 1937, no. 38 (as dating from 1870) London, Alex. Reid & Lefevre, French Masters of the 19th Century, 1937, no. 24 (as dating from 1870) London, National Gallery, Nineteenth Century French Painting, 1942-43, no. 13 (as dating from circa 1870) Venice, Gli Impressionisti alla XXIV Biennale di Venezia, 1948, no. 3, illustrated in the catalogue Cardiff, National Museum of Wales, How Impressionism Began, 1960, no. 39, illustrated in the catalogue St. Helier, La Société Jersiaise, Centenary Art Exhibition, 1973, no. 7 Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Vincent van Gogh Museum, Monet in Holland, 1986-87, no. 22, illustrated in colour in the catalogue (titled The Mill) Treviso, Casa dei Carraresi, Monet. I luoghi della pittura, 2001-02, no. 6, illustrated in colour in the catalogue Literature Georges Grappe, Claude Monet, Paris, 1909, illustrated p. 30 Erich Hancke, ‘Die klassische Malerei Frankreichs im 19. Jahrhundert’’’’, in Kunst und Künstler, vol. XI, no. 7, 1912, illustrated p. 64 Gustave Geffroy, ‘C. Monet’’’’, in L’’’’Art et les artistes, vol. II, no. 11, 1920, illustrated p. 58 Arsène Alexandre, Claude Monet, Paris, 1921, illustrated p. 58 Camille Mauclair, Claude Monet, Paris, 1927, illustrated pl. XII Léon Werth, Claude Monet, Paris, 1928, illustrated pl. 10 Glasgow Evening Citizen, 14th April 1937, illustrated Illustrated London News, 10th July 1937, illustrated John Rewald, The History of Impressionism, New York, 1961, illustrated p. 262 Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet, biographie et catalogue raisonné, Paris & Lausanne, 1974, vol. I, no. 171, illustrated p. 195 Hans Edvard Nørregård-Nielsen, 'Monet i Holland', in Meddelelser fra Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, 1987, illustrated p. 13 Daniel Wildenstein, Monet, Catalogue raisonné, Cologne, 1996, vol. II, no. 171, illustrated in colour p. 80 Marc-Henri Tellier, François Depeaux – Le charbonnier et les impressionnistes, Rouen, 2010, no. 293, listed p. 265 Catalogue Note In the present work Monet depicts a windmill known as ‘Het Oosterkattegat’’’’ which stood on the outskirts of the Zuiddijk in Zaandam (fig. 1). Looking north toward the town, the bell tower of the Oosterzijderkerk can be seen in the distance. The Monet family lived in Zaandam for four months over the summer of 1871. Zaandam was famous for its many mills which performed myriad functions: crushing, pumping, sawing and turning every conceivable material. Appropriately ‘Het Oosterkattegat’’’’ was used to grind pigments. Whilst Monet's wife Camille gave French conversation lessons to the wealthy Van der Stadt family, her husband concentrated on his art. Relatively free of financial worries because of a small inheritance from his late father, Monet produced a number of pictures of the town and its environs in a boldly inventive style. Monet wrote to his friend Camille Pissarro on 2nd June: ‘Zaandam is particularly remarkable and there is enough to paint there for a lifetime’’’’, and again on the 17th: ‘It is marvellous for painting here; there is everything you can find de plus amusant. Houses of all colours, hundreds of windmills and ravishing boats […] and with all this very fine weather, so that already I have several canvases on the go’’’’ (quoted in Monet in Holland (exhibition catalogue), op. cit., p. 99). Monet worked systematically through a series of twenty-five pictures that explored several areas surrounding Zaandam. The artist focused his attention upon the archetypical motifs of the Dutch landscape, canals, mills, and boats (fig. 2). Ronald Pickvance discusses Un Moulin à Zaandam in the context of the other works: ‘There is, however, one painting that is more finished than the others, and also much more deliberately composed. In The Mill ‘Het Oosterkattegat’’’’ [the present work], Monet has carefully plotted his composition, so that the planes succeed each other clearly and recession is marked out for the viewer […]. Monet captures the Dutchness, not merely externally – of fishing boat and windmill, town house and luchthuis, river and canal – but also the delicate enveloping light and atmosphere, subtly different from the Ile de France. The superb manner in which he registers the immense and often changing Dutch skies is sufficient proof of this’’’’ (R. Pickvance in ibid., p. 101). During the early years of the 1870s Monet’’’’s style underwent a transformation. The Franco-Prussian war forced the artist and his young family to seek safety in England where he found the companionship of other artists, such as Pissarro and Daubigny. Whilst in London Monet spent a great deal of time exploring the galleries, especially those containing works by the great English landscape painters Constable and Turner. However, whilst traditional landscape painting held a certain allure for Monet at this time, other more exotic influences occupied his attention. The artist and his contemporaries were fascinated by contemporary Japanese art and this had a profound effect on their own work. The inventive perspectives and clarity found in the works of Japanese artists, such as Hiroshige, provided French painters with new impetus to challenge the Salon-led style of the elder generation. The present work possesses a strong compositional rhythm and panoramic depth which parallels that of the complex asymmetry evident in Japanese woodcuts. However, the evolution of Impressionism is also manifest in Un Moulin à Zaandam. The artist’’’’ s use of colour and the areas of lively brushwork represent his gradual development of ideas and attempts to evoke the atmosphere of the landscape. Monet includes subtle, but evocative, signifiers of the weather in the deftly applied pennants flying in the wind, and the striking red sails of the mill and rooftops provide relief against the backdrop of greys that make up the shifting skies. Fig. 1 The mill ‘Het Oosterkattegat’’’’ in Zaandam, circa 1880 Fig. 2 Claude Monet, Moulins près de Zaandam , 1871, oil on canvas, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam See More See Less
Claude Monet - Portrait D'homme Debout

Claude Monet - Portrait D'homme Debout

Original 1864
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Lot number: 327
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Claude Monet (1840-1926) Portrait d'homme debout signed and dated 'Claude Monet 64' (lower right) oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 12 3/4 in. (46 x 32.5 cm.) Painted in 1864 Provenance Martignon. Galerie Bernheim-Jeune et Cie., Paris, by 1924. Goldschmitt, by whom acquired in 1924. Galerie Heinemann, Munich. Harry Sternberger, Israel, circa 1967.
Claude Monet - Chemin Creux, Effet De Lumière

Claude Monet - Chemin Creux, Effet De Lumière

Original 1881
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Lot number: 332
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Claude Monet 1840 - 1926 CHEMIN CREUX, EFFET DE LUMIÈRE Pastel on paper 10 3/8 by 14 in. 26.2 by 35.6 cm Executed in 1881. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Ernest and Victorine Donop de Monchy, Paris (by circa 1894-97) Sale: Martin & Courtois, Hôtel des Ventes, Angers, December 14, 1977, lot 155 Private Collection, Paris Acquired from the above (through Brame & Lorenceau, Paris) Exhibited Paris, Musée de l'Orangerie, Centenaire Monet-Rodin, 1940, no. 61 Literature Georges Lecomte, "Claude Monet et l'Impressionisme," L' Illustration, Christmas Edition, Paris, December 6, 1941, illustrated in color p. 44 Remus Niculescu, "G. de Bellio, L'ami des Impressionnistes," in Revue roumaine d'Histoire de l'Art, 1964, vol. I, no. 2, p. 269 Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet catalogue raisonné, vol. V, Lausanne, 1991, no. P73, illustrated p. 168 Catalogue Note Claude Monet's skill as a draughtsman is relatively under-appreciated, and pastels are especially rare in his œuvre. Most of Monet's pastels appear to date from the early years of his career, at a time when Impressionism was beginning to flourish, and the majority of his work in this medium is dedicated to recording the landscapes of his beloved Normandy, where he spent much of his youth. As he began to develop as a painter, it was to Normandy that he returned, joining his fellow artists Boudin, Sisley, Jongkind and Daubigny. The intimate and informal nature of Chemin Creux, effet de lunière make it a perfect example of true plein air painting, the pastel medium being ideally suited to capturing the artist's impression of the forest scene before him. Monet displays a great mastery in his handling of pastel in this work, allowing the viewer a glimpse of his extraordinary sense of luminosity, harmony and color. Monet is using the pastel medium to amplify the textural and atmospheric elements of the landscape before him, seen in the contrast between the broadly applied passages punctuated by quick staccato strokes, with rising verticals of the windswept trees giving rhythm and structure to this dense composition. James A. Ganz and Robert Kendall describe comparable pastels of this subject and from this period, noting that “color and mark, palpability and sensation take on a heightened significance, partially replacing the lure of narrative or the seduction of fine detail. We do not marvel at Monet’’s sleight of hand, in other words, but at the intensity and subtlety of his grasp of the experienced subject” (The Unknown Monet: Pastels and Drawings, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, exh. cat., 2007, p. 147). Early owners of the present work were Ernest and Victorine Donop de Monchy, heirs to the extraordinary collection of Dr. Georges de Bellio, friend and patron of the Impressionists. At the time of Dr. de Bellio’’s death in 1894, the inventory of the collection was staggering, including masterpieces by Pissarro, Renoir, Manet and over two dozen works by Monet. See More See Less
Claude Monet - Nymphéas

Claude Monet - Nymphéas

Original 1908
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Lot number: 22
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Claude Monet 1840 - 1926 NYMPHÉAS Signed Claude Monet (lower right) Oil on canvas 39 3/8 by 32 in. 100 by 81.3 cm Painted circa 1908. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Durand-Ruel & Bernheim-Jeune, Paris (acquired from the artist in December 1920) Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, Paris Henri Canonne, Paris (acquired from the above in July 1923) Jacques Canonne, Paris (by descent from the above) Private Collection, Switzerland (sold: Christie’’s, New York, November 7, 1995, lot 21) Private Collection, United States (acquired at the above sale and sold: Sotheby’’s, New York, May 10, 2000, lot 22) Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Paris, Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, Claude Monet, 1921, no. 42 Paris, Galerie Paul Rosenberg, Claude Monet, oeuvres de 1891 à 1919, 1936, no. 28 Billings, Montana, Yellowstone Art Museum, Masterpieces from the William I. Koch Collection, 2000-01 Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Things I Love: The Many Collections of William I. Koch, 2005 Literature Arsène Alexandre, Claude Monet, Paris, 1921, no. 47, illustrated in color p. 119 Adolphe Tabarant, “Nymphéas,” Le Bulletin de la vie artistique, Paris, September 1925, illustrated p. 376 Arsène Alexandre, La Collection Canonne, Paris, 1930, pp. 45-46 Lionello Venturi, Les Archives de l’’Impressionnisme, vol. I, Paris & New York, 1939, p. 457 Denis Rouart, Jean-Dominique Rey & Robert Maillard, Monet Nymphéas ou les miroirs du temps, Paris, 1972, illustrated p. 165 Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné, vol. IV, Lausanne & Paris, 1979, no. 1735, illustrated p. 231 Daniel Wildenstein, Monet Catalogue Raisonné, vol. IV, Cologne, 1996, no. 1735, illustrated p. 805 Denis Rouart & Jean-Dominique Rey, Monet Water Lilies, The Complete Series, Paris, 2008 illustrated in color p. 131 Catalogue Note Claude Monet’’ s Nymphéas are among the most iconic and celebrated Impressionist paintings. The profound impact these pictures have made on the evolution of Modern Art marks this series as Monet’’s greatest achievement. The famous lily pond in his garden at Giverny provided the subject matter for most of his major late works. These spectacular canvases document the changes in his style and his constant pictorial innovations as he continued to paint this theme until his death in 1926. The present work dates from circa 1908 when he painted what are arguably the finest and most technically sophisticated examples from the series. The canvas here is an extraordinary example of the artist's virtuosity as a colorist. The surface texture is rich with detail, particularly in the passages where the blossoms float atop the water. This distinction between reflection and surface, water and flora, and the general clarity of the scene are particularly striking in Monet's canvas here, and evidence its distinction as one of the most technically sophisticated of the entire series. By 1890, Monet had become financially successful enough to buy the house with a large garden at Giverny, which he had rented since 1883. With enormous vigor and determination, he swiftly set about transforming the gardens and creating a large pond. There were initially a number of complaints about Monet’’s plans to divert the river Epte through his garden in order to feed his new pond, which he had to address in his application to the Préfet of the Eure department: "I would like to point out to you that, under the pretext of public salubrity, the aforementioned opponents have in fact no other goal than to hamper my projects out of pure meanness, as is frequently the case in the country where Parisian landowners are involved […] I would also like you to know that the aforementioned cultivation of aquatic plants will not have the importance that this term implies and that it will be only a pastime, for the pleasure of the eye, and for motifs to paint" (quoted in Michael Hoog, Musée de l’’Orangerie. The Nymphéas of Claude Monet, Paris, 2006, p. 119). Once the garden was designed according to the artist’’s vision, it offered a boundless source of inspiration, and provided the major themes that dominated the last three decades of Monet’’s career. Towards the end of his life, he obfuscated his initial intentions, perhaps with a mind to his own mythology, telling a visitor to his studio: "It took me some time to understand my water lilies. I planted them purely for pleasure; I grew them with no thought of painting them. A landscape takes more than a day to get under your skin. And then, all at once I had the revelation – how wonderful my pond was – and reached for my palette. I’’ve hardly had any other subject since that moment" (quoted in Stephan Koja, Claude Monet (exhibition catalogue), Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna, 1996, p. 146). Once discovered, the subject of water lilies offered a wealth of inspiration that Monet went on to explore for several decades. His carefully designed garden presented the artist with a micro-cosmos in which he could observe and paint the changes in weather, season and time of day, as well as the ever-changing colors and patterns. John House wrote: "The water garden in a sense bypassed Monet’’s long searches of earlier years for a suitable subject to paint. Designed and constantly supervised by the artist himself, and tended by several gardeners, it offered him a motif that was at the same time natural and at his own command - nature re-designed by a temperament. Once again Monet stressed that his real subject when he painted was the light and weather" (J. House, Monet: Nature into Art, Newhaven, 1986, p. 31). After the turn of the century, the gardens around Monet’’s Giverny home became the central theme of his work. He produced a series of painting on the themes of the Japanese footbridge and water lilies. Monet’’s attention to detail verged on obsessive and he fastidiously maintained the pond and its plants to near perfection. Elizabeth Murray writes: “The water gardener would row out in the pond in a small green flat-bottomed boat to clean the entire surface. Any moss, algae, or water grasses which grew from the bottom had to be pulled out. Monet insisted on clarity. Next the gardener would inspect the water lilies themselves. Any yellow leaves or spent blossoms were removed. If the plants had become dusty from vehicles passing by on the Chemin du Roy, the dirt road nearby, the gardener would take a bucket of water and rinse off the leaves and flowers, ensuring that the true colors and beauty would shine forth" (E. Murray, 'Monet as a Garden Artist,' Monet, Late Paintings of Giverny from the Musée Marmottan, New Orleans, 1995, p. 53). In 1908 Jean-Claude Nicolas Forestier visited Monet at Giverny and gave a thoughtful description of Monet’’ s working methods for the review Fermes et Châteaux: "In this mass of intertwined verdure and foliage […] the lilies spread their round leaves and dot the water with a thousand red, pink, yellow and white flowers [… ]. The Master often comes here, where the bank of the pond is bordered with thick clumps of irises. His swift, short strokes place brushloads of luminous colour as he moves from one place to another, according to the hour […]. The canvas he visited this morning at dawn is not the same as the canvas we find him working on in the afternoon. In the morning, he records the blossoming of the flowers, and then, once they begin to close, he returns to the charms of the water itself and its shifting reflections, the dark water that trembles beneath the somnolent leaves of the water-lilies" (quoted in Daniel Wildenstein, Monet or The Triumph of Impressionism, Cologne, 2003, p. 384). The unending variety of forms and tones that the ponds provided allowed Monet to work consistently on a number of canvases at the same time. The spectacular field of color presented by Nymphéas is created to elicit an instinctive emotional response rather than to record a particular location, temporal conditions or natural phenomena. Over the course of several years, Monet experimented with different approaches and painting techniques. The paintings from 1905 were thickly painted with a dense surface and horizontally oriented, while those from 1906 interplay between rich impastoed areas with finer washes. In 1907 Monet positioned his canvases vertically and experimented with longer brushstrokes. Another important feature of the works from this period is how Monet removed the perspectival elements that had existed in his earlier renditions of the lily pond, so the banks and borders which were sometimes featured no longer informed the scope or scale of the works. Since the birth of Impressionism, Monet’’s primary concern had been the sensation of color and its properties and these technical innovations underwrote his highly advanced theoretical approach. In Marcel Proust’’s À la recherche du temps perdu, the narrator goes to visit a fictional painter called Elstir who was based in part on Monet. Here, in the studio the narrator begins to see Elstir’’s new purpose for art: "But I was able to discern from these that the charm of each of them lay in a sort of metamorphosis of the things represented in it, analogous to what in poetry we call metaphor, and that, if God the Father had created things by naming them, it was by taking away their names or giving them other names that Elstir created them anew. The names which denote things correspond invariably to an intellectual notion, alien to our true impressions, and compelling us to eliminate from them everything that is not in keeping with itself" (quoted in Charles Prendergast, The Triangle of Representation, New York, 2000, p. 154). Monet’’ s Nymphéas fulfills the promise of Elstir’’s intentions, managing to transcend painting's traditional, illusory function in order to create a new sense of purpose for art. Even in his earliest depictions of the Nymphéas Monet embraced a monumental scope, which would be most fully realized a decade later in his Les Grandes décorations, a sequence of monumental paintings of the gardens that took his depictions of the water lily pond in a dramatic new direction - the artist envisaged an environment in which the viewer would be completely surrounded by the paintings. In 1909 Monet was quoted by Claude Roger-Marx outlining his vision: "The temptation came to me to use this water-lily theme for the decoration of a drawing room: carried along the length of the walls, enveloping the entire interior with its unity, it would produce the illusion of an endless whole, of a watery surface with no horizon and no shore; nerves exhausted by work would relax there, following the restful example of those still waters, a refuge of peaceful meditation in the middle of a flowering aquarium" (quoted in Claude Roger-Marx, "Les Nymphéas de Monet," in Le Cri de Paris, Paris, 23rd May 1909). The present work and the others in this series eventually led to Les Grandes décorations, now in the Musée de l’’Orangerie in Paris, which are according to Daniel Wildenstein "the crowning glory of Monet’’s career, in which all his work seemed to culminate"(D. Wildenstein, op. cit., 1996, p. 840). The lasting legacy of Monet’’s late work is most evident in the art of the Abstract Expressionists, such as Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, Jackson Pollock, Joan Mitchell and abstractionist Gerhard Richter, whose bold color planes and rejection of figuration is foreshadowed by Monet’’s depictions of water lilies. Jean-Dominique Rey discusses Monet’’s inarguable influence on future generations of artists: "Late Monet is a mirror in which the future can be read. The generation that, in about 1950, rediscovered it, also taught us how to see it for ourselves. And it was Monet who allowed us to recognize this generation. Osmosis occurred between them. The old man, mad about color, drunk with sensation, fighting with time so as to abolish it and place it in the space that sets it free, atomizing it into a sumptuous bouquet and creating a complete film of a ‘beyond painting’’, remains of consequential relevance today" (J.-D. Rey, op. cit., Paris, 2008, p. 116). Nymphéas was once in the prestigious Canonne Collection, formed by the Parisian pharmacist and industrialist Henri Canonne (1867-1961). Canonne invented the Valda tablet, a throat lozenge and one of the earliest over the counter medicines, which remains in circulation today under the control of Glaxo SmithKline. Canonne made a fortune from this invention and similarly to Dr. Albert C Barnes’’s who invented Argyrol, Canonne amassed an impressive collection of Impressionist & Post-Impressionist art. The picture remained with Canonne's family throughout the war, and it was eventually inherited by his son Jacques. Fig. 1 Claude Monet painting beside the water-lily pond with Blanche Hoschedé Monet in July 1915 Fig. 2 Claude Monet, Nymphéas , 1914-17, oil on canvas, California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco Museum of Arts Fig. 3 Claude Monet by his water-lily pond at Giverny in 1905. Photograph by Jacques-Ernest Bulloz. Fig. 4 A gardener (likely Félix Breuil) tending the water-lily pond at Giverny Fig. 5 Claude Monet, Nymphéas , 1907, oil on canvas, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston See More See Less
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