Amedeo Modigliani

Italy (Livorno 1884Parigi 1920 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Amedeo Modigliani
MODIGLIANI Amedeo Monsieur Baranowski

Christie's /Nov 5, 2013
18,292,236.77 - 25,609,131.48
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Artworks in Arcadja
590

Some works of Amedeo Modigliani

Extracted between 590 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait De Roger Dutilleul

Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait De Roger Dutilleul

Original 1919
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Gross Price
Lot number: 11
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Provenance Roger Dutilleul (acquired from the artist) By descent to the present owner Exhibited Paris, Galerie de France, Modigliani, 1945-1946, no. 34 Paris, Musée d’’Art Moderne, L’’Art Moderne italien, 1950, n.n. Paris, Galerie Schmit, Tableaux de Maîtres français 1900-1955, 1973, no. 37 Paris, Musée d’’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Amedeo Modigliani, 1981, no. 70 Paris, Galerie Schmit, Maitres français XIX-XXe siècles, 1986, no. 43 Lugano, Museo D’’arte moderna, Amedeo Modigliani, 1999, no. 57 Paris, Musée du Luxembourg & Milan, Pinacoteca di Brera, Modigliani l’’Ange au visage grave, 2002-2003, no. 95 New York, The Jewish Museum; Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario & Washington DC, The Phillips Collection, Modigliani: Beyond the myth, 2004-2005, no. 78 Tokyo, The National Art Center & Osaka, The National Museum of Art, Modigliani and Primitivism, 2008, n.n. Villeneuve d'Ascq, Lille Métropole Musée d'art moderne, d'art contemporain et d'art brut, Réouverture du LaM, 2010, n.n. 11 PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION Amedeo Modigliani 1884 - 1920 PORTRAIT DE ROGER DUTILLEUL signed Modigliani (upper right) oil on canvas 100.4 by 64.7 cm ; 39 1/2 by 25 1/2 in Painted in 1919. Estimate 7,000,000 - 10,000,000 EUR Print Please notify me when the condition report is available
Amedeo Modigliani - Le Poète Blaise Cendrars

Amedeo Modigliani - Le Poète Blaise Cendrars

Original 1918
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Gross Price
Lot number: 1317
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Amedeo Modigliani (Livorno 1884–1920 Paris) Le poète Blaise Cendrars, 1918, signed Modigliani, pencil on thin paper, inscribed in unknown hand: Le poète Blaise Cendrars, 42 x 26 cm, framed, (PP) Provenance: Blaise Cendrars, Paris Osvaldo Patani, Milan Private Collection, Switzerland Exhibitions: Verona/Turin,1984/1985, Galleria dello Scudo (verso 2 labels)/Palazzo Reale Turin, Modigliani, Dipinti e Disegni, Incontri Italiani 1900 – 1920; Verona 1988, Galleria Civica d’’’’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Palazzo Forti; Milan 1988/1989, Società per le Belle Arti ed Esposizione La Permanente; Düsseldorf/Zurich 1991, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein - Westfalen (verso label) / Kunsthaus Zürich (verso label), Amedeo Modigliani, Malerei, Skupturen, Zeichnungen, exh. cat. no. 167, p. 170 with ill. no. 118; Takasaky/Tokyo/Kyoto, Japan, 1994, Municipal Museum / Museum Takashimaya / Takashimaya Gallery of Art, Montmartre et les Peintres, exh. cat. no. 120 with ill. p. 89; Marina di Massa, 1996, Massa Carrara, Palazzo Carrara, Modigliani, exh. brochure with ill. (verso label); Bonn 2009, Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Modigliani, exh. cat. pp. 106 and 181, no. 99 (verso label) Literature: Osvaldo Patani, Amedeo Modigliani, Catalogo generale, Disegni 1906– 1920, Milan 1991, p. 236 (referred to here as Blaise Cendrars seduto a un tavolo); Christian Parisot, Modigliani, catalogue raisonné vol. II, Livorno 1991, p. 370, no. 44/18; Anne-Marie Conas, Claude Leroy, Blaise Cendrars, Portraits, Les Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2010, pp. 92-93; Werner Schmalenbach, Amedeo Modigliani, Malerei, Skulpturen, Zeichnungen, Munich 1990, p. 170, no. 167, plate 118
Amedeo Modigliani - Nudo Femminile Seduto

Amedeo Modigliani - Nudo Femminile Seduto

Original
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Lot number: 190
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Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) Nudo femminile seduto signed 'modigliani' (lower right) brush and gray wash over pencil on buff paper laid down on paper 21½ x 16¾ in. (54.6 x 42.6 cm.) Painted circa 1914-1916 Lamberto Vitali, Milan (circa 1930). A. Rustioni, Milan (acquired from the above, by 1955); sale, Christie's, London, 24 June 2009, lot 138. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner. R. Carrieri, 12 opere di Amedeo Modigliani, Milan, 1947, p. 1 (illustrated). J. Lanthemann, Modigliani, Catalogue raisonné, sa vie, son oeuvre complet, son art, Paris, 1970, p. 142, no. 608 (illustrated, p. 309). C. Parisot, Modigliani, Catalogue raisonné, peintures, dessins, aquarelles, Livorno, 1991, vol. II, p. 375, no. 28/14 (illustrated, p. 359). O. Patani, Amedeo Modigliani, Catalogo generale, sculture e disegni 1909-1914, Milan, 1992, p. 206, no. 243 (illustrated; titled Nudo di donna seduto). Milan, Casa della Cultura, Associazione fra gli Amatori e i Cultori delle Arti Figurative Contemporanee, Amedeo Modigliani, April-May 1946, no. 38 (illustrated; titled Nudo femminile seduto verso sinistra and dated 1916-1917). Livorno, Villa Fabbricotti, Presentazione di Disegni di Amedeo Modigliani, September-October 1955, no. 7 (illustrated on the frontispiece). Milan, Palazzo Reale, Mostra di Amedeo Modigliani, November-December 1958, p. 37, no. 101 (titled Nudo femminile seduto verso sinistra and dated 1916-1917). Rome, Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna, Modigliani, January- February 1959, p. 55, no. 93 (titled Nudo femminile seduto verso sinistra and dated 1916-1917). Verona, Galleria dello Scudo and Turin, Palazzo Reale, Modigliani, dipinti e disegni, Incontri Italiani 1900-1920, November 1984-April 1985, pp. 122-123, no. 22 (illustrated). Lugano, Museo d'arte Moderna della Città, Amedeo Modigliani, March-June 1999, p. 157, no. 6 (illustrated). Rome, Complesso del Vittoriano, Modigliani, February-June 2006, p. 273, no. 14 (illustrated, p. 15). Modigliani's artistic vision found its definition by exploring the functional power of line and it was through studies such as the present work that he discovered new solutions to formal issues. This concise yet elegant rendering acts to transfigure the female form into purely plastic, linear values whilst retaining a sense of human sentiment and vitality. Indeed, the model's languidly tilted head and slightly parted mouth lends her a sensual grace that anticipates the great nude paintings with which Modigliani is most frequently associated. In the early stages of his career, from about 1910 to 1914, Modigliani hoped to establish his reputation as a sculptor marking the transition from sculpting back to painting by incessant drawing. The intensity of this preoccupation with sculptural form is reflected in the present seated model, whose limbs have been delineated into clear, precise volumes. An interest in the effects of proportion and relief can also be seen in the selective use of incisive, bold marks and blocks of background shadow. Whilst the subject of the nude evokes the great tradition of classical European art, the elemental simplicity of this figure represents a distillation of a range of visual references, including Cézanne's treatment of space and mass, the abstract purity of Brancusi and the expressive energy of African and Oceanic tribal art. These influences are particularly evident in the planar distortions of the facial features and the blank, inscrutable eyes that lend the figure a detached air of self-absorption. In this way, Nudo femminile seduto fulfills Modigliani's aim to synthesize objective fact and individual characterization through an entirely original and personal mode of expression.
Amedeo Modigliani - Monsieur Baranowski

Amedeo Modigliani - Monsieur Baranowski

Original 1918
Estimate:

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Lot number: 19
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Description:
Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) Monsieur Baranowski signed 'Modigliani' (lower left) oil on canvas 43¾ x 21 5/8 in. (112 x 56 cm.) Painted in 1918 Leopold Zborowski, Paris. Samuel Bing, Paris (by 1925). Collection Mare, Paris. Mark Ollivert, Paris. Galerie Zak, Paris (by 1929). Mme Michaux, Paris (by 1930). The Storran Gallery, London. Sir Robert and Lady Sainsbury, London (acquired from the above, 20 February 1937); sale, Sotheby's, London, 30 June 1998, lot 17. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner. PROPERTY OF AN EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTOR W. George, "Modigliani" in L'amour de l'art, vol. 6, no. 10, October 1925, p. 387 (illustrated). A. Pfannstiel, L'art et la vie: Modigliani, Paris, 1929, p. 45. G. Scheiwiller, "Amedeo Modigliani" in Arte Moderna Italiana, 1932 (illustrated, pl. XXVI). G. Scheiwiller, "Amedeo Modigliani" in Arte Moderna Italiana, 1935 (illustrated, pl. XXVII). G. Scheiwiller, "Amedeo Modigliani" in Arte Moderna Italiana, 1936 (illustrated, pl. XXVIII). E.H. Ramsden, An Introduction to Modern Art, London, 1940 (illustrated, pl. XXI). G. Scheiwiller, "Amedeo Modigliani" in Arte Moderna Italiana, 1942 (illustrated, pl. XXVIII). G. Scheiwiller, "Amedeo Modigliani" in Arte Moderna Italiana, 1950 (illustrated, pl. XXVI). E. Carli, Modigliani, Rome, 1952, p. 33, no. 23 (illustrated, pl. 23). "Omaggio a Amedeo Modigliani" in Rivista di Livorno, July-August 1954 (illustrated, pl. 13). E. Newton, "Unbeaten Tracks" in Time and Tide, 2 April 1955. A. Pfannstiel, Modigliani et son oeuvre, Paris, 1956, p. 144, no. 276 (dated 1917-1918). The Times, 21 April 1958 (illustrated). F. Russoli, Modigliani, Milan, 1958 (illustrated in color, pl. 26). A. Ceroni, Amedeo Modigliani, peintre, Milan, 1958, p. 63, no. 125 (illustrated). "La collection de M. Robert Sainsbury" in Connaissance des arts, no. 106, December 1960, p. 146 (illustrated in color). The Tatler, 17 April 1963, p. 155 (illustrated). The Times, 18 April 1963 (illustrated). A. Ceroni, Amedeo Modigliani, dessins et sculptures, Milan, 1965, p. 19 (illustrated in situ in the 1925 Galerie Bing exhibition in Paris). C. Pavolini, Modigliani, London, 1966 (illustrated, pl. 23). Epoca, 10 September 1967 (illustrated). P. Sichel, Modigliani: A Biography, London, 1967, p. 469. G. Csorba, Modigliani, Budapest, 1969, no. 43. A. Ceroni and L. Piccioni, I dipinti di Modigliani, Milan, 1970, p. 102, no. 280 (illustrated). J. Lanthemann, Modigliani: Catalogue raisonné, sa vie, son oeuvre complet, son art, Barcelona, 1970 (illustrated, pl. 286). Modigliani Exhibition, exh. cat., Daimaru Department Store, Tokyo and Osaka, 1979 (illustrated in situ in the 1925 Galerie Bing exhibition in Paris). C. Mann, Modigliani, New York, 1980, pp. 166 and 214, no. 123 (illustrated, p. 169). A. Werner, Amedeo Modigliani, New York, 1985, p. 116 (illustrated in color, p. 117). C. Parisot, Modigliani: Catalogue raisonné, peintures, dessins, aquarelles, Livorno, 1991, vol. II, pp. 333-334, no. 37/1918 (illustrated in color, p. 221). O. Patani, Amedeo Modigliani: Catalogo generale, dipinti, Milan, 1991, p. 290, no. 291 (illustrated). S. Butler, Modigliani, London, 1994, p. 104 (illustrated in color). S. Hooper, ed., Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Collection, London, 1997, vol. I, p. 220, no. 133 (illustrated in color, p. 221). E. Braun, "The Faces of Modigliani: Identity Politics Under Fascism" in Modigliani: Beyond the Myth, exh. cat., The Jewish Museum, New York, 2004, p. 41, no. 24 (titled Ritratto d'uomo). Paris, Galerie Bing, Modigliani, October-November 1925, no. 3. Kunsthaus Zürich, Italienische Maler, March-May 1927, p. 10, no. 101. Venice, XVII Esposizione Biennale Internazionale d'Arte: Mostra individuale di Amedeo Modigliani, 1930, p. 119, no. 24 (titled Ritratto d'uomo). London, The Storran Gallery, Modigliani, April 1937, no. 3 (illustrated). London, Gimpel Fils, A. Modigliani, 1948, no. 1. London, Ben Uri Art Gallery, Famous Jewish Artists of the Past, June-July 1949, no. 20. London, Tate Gallery; Leicester, City Art Gallery and Manchester, City Art Gallery, Modern Italian Art, 1950, p. 13, no. 68 (illustrated, pl. 10). Glasgow, McLellan Galleries, Festival of Jewish Arts, February 1951, no. 90. Rome, VI Quadriennale Nazionale d'Arte di Roma, December 1951-April 1952, no. 14. London, Whitechapel Art Gallery, 20th Century Form: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, April-May 1953, no. 33. London, Roland, Browse & Delbanco, Modigliani: Drawings, March 1955, p. 5, no. 21. Kunsthalle Bern, Modigliani, Campigli, Sironi, August-September 1955, p. 7, no. 20. Paris, Galerie Charpentier, Cent tableaux de Modigliani, 1958, no. 65 (illustrated). Marseilles, Musée Cantini, Modigliani, June-July 1958. Milan, Palazzo Reale, Mostra di Amedeo Modigliani, November-December 1958, p. 28, no. 42 (illustrated). Rome, Galleria nazionale d'arte moderna, Modigliani, January-February 1959, no. 31 (illustrated). Boston, Museum of Fine Arts and Los Angeles County Museum, Modigliani: Paintings and Drawings, March-April 1961, p. 49, no. 27. London, Tate Gallery, Private Views, April-May 1963, no. 167. Edinburgh, Royal Scottish Academy and London, Tate Gallery, Modigliani, August-November 1963, p. 20, no. 43. Otterlo, Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Collectie Robert & Lisa Sainsbury, August-October 1966, no. 34 (illustrated). Lugano, Museo d'arte moderna, Amedeo Modigliani, March-June 1999, pp. 76 and 201, no. 59 (illustrated in color, p. 78; illustrated again, p. 201). Musée d'art moderne de la ville de Paris, L'Ecole de Paris, 1904-1929: La part de l'Autre, November 2000-March 2001, p. 352, no. 282 (illustrated in color). Rome, Complesso del Vittoriano, Modigliani, February-June 2006, p. 188, no. 31 (illustrated in color, p. 189). Tokyo, Kokuritsu Shin Bijutsukan and Osaka, Kokuritsu Kokusai Bijutsukan, Modigliani et le primitivisme, March-September 2008, p. 150, no. 42 (illustrated in color, p. 151; titled Pierre-Edouard Baranowski). A slender young man, elegant and mannered in the extreme, sits at a wooden table, his head inclined to one side as he meets the viewer's gaze with pale blue eyes and the very faintest hint of a smile. His neatly combed hair falls just beneath his ears and his shirt collar is rumpled ever so slightly, lending him a studied bohemian air. His features are delicate, his beauty seemingly fragile and fleeting, and the sinuous curves of his pose--the legs crossed at the knee, one hand resting on the table's edge, the torso turned on the oblique and the chin pensively downturned--exude a sense of androgynous grace. The subject of the portrait is a painter named Pierre-Edouard Baranowski, a Polish émigré to Montparnasse who would surely have been forgotten today were it not for Modigliani's extraordinarily searching and sympathetic characterization of the sensitive, introspective young man. "Who was Monsieur Baranowski?" Alfred Werner has written. "One of the hundreds of artists and intellectuals who flocked to Paris from Eastern Europe, most of whose talents were to remain unrecognized, their dreams unfulfilled" (op. cit., 1968, p. 116). The portrait of Baranowski takes its place in the peerless visual history of Left Bank culture that Modigliani produced during the second decade of the twentieth century. Werner Schmalenbach has written, "In his portraits, without ever setting out to be so, Modigliani was a chronicler of the vie bohème of Montparnasse, the district where in his time the artistic life of the French capital was being transformed. He painted so many people from this world that one is almost impelled to ask whom he did not paint. Modigliani was part of this bohème in a highly personal and indeed an exemplary way. In the eyes of his contemporaries, he was--as he has remained--its epitome" (Modigliani and the Artists of Montparnasse, exh. cat., Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 2002, p. 33). Although Baranowski exhibited regularly in Paris (at the Salon d'Automne in 1922 and 1924, the Salon des Tuileries in 1924, 1928, and 1929, and the Salon des Indépendants in 1927), it was not in these hallowed halls but almost certainly in the lively cafés of Montparnasse that he met Modigliani. The two men may have been introduced by Modi's close friend Moise Kisling or by his dealer Léopold Zborowski (fig. 1), both Polish exiles like Baranowski. By the time that they met late in the teens, Modigliani's youthful looks and promise had been ravaged by illness and alcohol, and he may have recognized in Baranowski's delicate features and sensitive demeanor the image of his earlier self. When the Italian-born Modigliani moved to Montparnasse from neighboring Montmartre in late 1908 or early 1909, the neighborhood had already earned a reputation as the center of avant-garde artistic life in Paris. Lively, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated, Montparnasse was home to hundreds of artists, poets, writers, and critics from dozens of different countries, all of whom gathered at the Café de la Rotonde and other local watering holes to trade ideas and inspiration. This highly charged environment, with its broad range of cultural stimuli, was essential for the development of Modigliani's distinctive brand of portraiture. Kenneth Wayne has written, "The internationalism of the Montparnasse artist's community is its single most defining characteristic and a key point to consider when evaluating the art that developed there in the early twentieth century. Of the many distinguished artists who worked in Montparnasse, Modigliani had perhaps the widest range of discernible sources, making him the ultimate Montparnasse sophisticate and the quintessential figure of this extraordinary time and place" (ibid., pp. 16-17). Modigliani's early years in Montparnasse were undeniably trying ones. It had been difficult to make his career as a painter, especially following the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, which understandably depressed the art market. But by 1917--the year before he painted the young Baranowski--things had begun to look up. Fernande Barrey, Foujita's wife, introduced Modigliani in June 1916 to Zborowski, an entrepreneurial young art lover and student at the Sorbonne, who hoped to establish himself as a broker of modern pictures. Although Zborowski and his wife Hanka were little better off than the perpetually impoverished painter, in November 1916 the aspiring dealer made a contract with Modigliani. Zborowski would provide a small room in his apartment for Modigliani to use as a studio, would find (and fund) models and steer portrait commissions his way, would cover the cost of paint and canvas, and would pay the artist a stipend of twenty francs a day, along with unlimited drink--all this in exchange for Modigliani's entire artistic output. Zborowski also encouraged Modigliani to take up the painting of female nudes, which he knew would be more commercially viable than straight portraits; by the end of 1917, Modigliani had produced more than twenty-five works in this genre, which Zborowski set out to use to promote his friend's work and establish his career. Modigliani had participated in various group shows previously and had gathered some favorable notices, but it was Zborowski who managed to arrange the next step: the artist's first one-man exhibition, at the Galerie Berthe Weill. The show ran during the month of December 1917 and included as many as seven of the recent nudes, along with a selection of portraits and drawings. Modigliani's solo debut, however, quickly turned into one of the great scandals in the history of early modernism. In order to attract attention, Berthe Weill placed one of the nudes in her gallery window. The local police commissionaire divisionaire had his office across the street; he noticed a crowd gathering and sent an officer to investigate. When the commissioner learned that the artist had dared to show pubic hair--the "forbidden triangle," as artists were wont to call it--he became livid and promptly ordered the painting removed. He then demanded that all the nudes inside the gallery be taken down as well, threatening to confiscate the lot of them and to close down the show altogether if Madame Weill did not comply. Left with no choice, she removed the offending pictures, thereby condemning the show to financial failure. The Weill debacle had a silver lining though. Modigliani could now claim the virtually unique distinction among his colleagues of having had his work been banned by the police, an official measure that had last been taken before the war, when the authorities removed Van Dongen's full-frontal nude painting of his wife, Le châle espagnol, from the 1913 Salon d'Automne. Modigliani's newfound notoriety generated a spike of interest in his work, and Zborowski made some sales early in 1918; the artist, it seemed, may have reached the end of his long run of bad luck. His hopes were quickly dashed, however, when a whirlwind of troubles blew in with the month of March. His girlfriend Jeanne Hébuterne announced that she was pregnant, his own health took a frightening turn, and worst of all, the Germans decided to launch their last-ditch, all-out offensive to bring the First World War to an end. A huge German railway gun known as Big Bertha lobbed massive shells into Paris every twenty minutes. People fled the capital in droves, and the bottom fell out of the art market. Hoping that he might find better business prospects (to say nothing of greater safety) outside of the capital, Zborowski assembled an odd entourage--Modigliani, Jeanne, Jeanne's mother Eudoxie (who disliked Modigliani and constantly harangued him), Foujita and his wife, and Chaïm Soutine--and relocated in April to the south of France, remaining there until mid-1919. Modigliani's portrait of Baranowski is dated to 1918 and was almost certainly painted early in the year--in that brief moment of rising fortunes after the succès de scandale at Berthe Weill's and before the flight to the Riviera. In the south of France, separated from his sophisticated Parisian coterie of artists, poets, and patrons, Modigliani would rely for his models principally on local children and working girls, whom he painted as solid and heavy-limbed, their poses frontal and static, their gazes direct and unwavering. The portrait of Baranowski, by contrast, represents the consummate realization of the signature figural type that Modigliani developed after 1916 in his portraits of the habitués of Montparnasse (fig. 4). The Polish painter's face is oval and elongated, with impenetrable almond-shaped eyes and sensuous pursed lips; the neck is graceful and swan-like, the fingers long and tapered, and the complex, serpentine pose mannered almost to the point of preciousness. The portrait is undeniably that of a specific individual: a young artist trying to make his way, at once exquisitely vulnerable and quietly confident in his studied androgynous grace. "To do any work, I must have a living person. I must be able to see him opposite me," Modigliani proclaimed (quoted in Modigliani and His Models, exh. cat., Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2006, p. 31). Yet Modigliani has translated the sitter's likeness into his own distinctive pictorial idiom, which fully integrates a host of disparate sources: the sinuous contours and elongated proportions of Italian Mannerist painting, the exquisite linear stylizations of African and Oceanic masks, the abstract refinement of sculpture by Brancusi (fig. 5), and the incisive firmness of line that comes from Modigliani's own experience of stone carving (fig. 6). The resulting portrait is simultaneously a sensitive, individualized characterization of Baranowski and an archetype of Modigliani's unique conception of beauty. True to reality, Modigliani drew forth and preserved the essential likeness of the person who sat before him; no less true to himself, he described his sitter in a personal language that was compellingly subjective and intuitive. In an eloquent paean to his long-time friend, the poet Jean Cocteau penned the following account of this extraordinary achievement: "It was not Modigliani who distorted and lengthened the face, who established its asymmetry, knocked out one of the eyes, elongated the neck. All of this happened in his heart. And this is how he drew us at the tables in the Café de la Rotonde; this is how he saw us, loved us, felt us, disagreed or fought with us. His drawing was a silent conversation, a dialogue between his lines and ours... We were all subordinated to his style, to a type that he carried within himself, and he automatically looked for faces that resembled the configuration that he required, both from man and woman. Resemblance is actually nothing more than a pretext that allows the painter to confirm the picture that is in his mind. And by that one does not mean an actual, physical picture, but the mystery of one's own genius..." (quoted in D. Krystof, Amedeo Modigliani, 1884-1920: The Poetry of Seeing, Cologne, 2000, p. 54). Modigliani's successful formulation of a viable brand of portraiture is all the more significant following the popularization of photography, which should have rendered the painted likeness obsolete, and the radical refusal of mimesis and naturalism under cubism. Defying this double death-knell, Modigliani steered his own course. Tamar Garb has concluded, "Modigliani's portrait practice internalized the iconoclasm of cubism and the liberatory power of primitivism at the same time that it affirmed its commitment to the conventional function of the portrait: the adumbration and celebration of the named individual... The power of Modigliani's portraits lies in their capacity to render the tensions between the generic and the specific, the mask and the face, the endemic and the particular--indeed, to thematize the problematic of portraiture for this generation. Composed from the materials of history and the parts of the body, they leave all their seams visible, awkward yet eloquent, on the painted surface" (Modigliani: Beyond the Myth, exh. cat., The Jewish Museum, New York, 2004, pp. 44 and 53). (fig. 1) Amedeo Modigliani, Leopold Zborowski assis, 1919. Museu de Arte, São Paolo. (fig. 2) Amedeo Modigliani,Autoportrait, 1919-1920. Museu de Arte Contemporanea da Universidade, São Paulo. (fig. 3) Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait de Morgan Russell, 1918. Private collection. (fig. 4) Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait du musicien Mario Varvoglis, 1919-1920. Sold, Christie's, London, 28 March 1988, lot 28. (fig. 5) Constantin Brancusi, Danaïde, circa 1913. Sold, Christie's, New York, 7 May 2002, lot 27. (fig. 6) Amedeo Modigliani, Tête, 1911-1912. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. (fig. 7) The present painting at the Galerie Bing, Paris, 1925.
Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait De Anne Bjarne

Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait De Anne Bjarne

Original 1919
Estimate:

Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 326
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
** Amadeo Modigliani 1884-1920 (Italian) Portrait de Anne Bjarne, 1919 oil on canvas h:100 w:65 cm. signed upper right Provenance: Galerie Léopold Zborowski, Paris. Hugh Blaker, London (acquired from the above in 1919). Murray Urquhart, London. Leicester Galleries, London . The Lefevre Gallery, London (acquired in 1966). Mr. and Mrs. David Bakalar, Boston. Private collection. Exhibited: XIX & XX Century French Paintings, The Lefevre Gallery, London,November-December, 967(illustrated in color in exhibition catalogue, p.19, no.9). Boston, Museum of Fine Arts (on loan). Literature: M. Urquhart, The Blaker Diary, 'Apollo,' no. LXXVIII, October 20, 1963, p. 298 H. Finsen, Modigliani and two Swedish Ladies, "Apollo,' no. LXXXI, February, 1965, p. 133. M. Wykes-Joyce, XIX and XX Century French Paintings, 'Arts Review', November 25, 1967, vol. XIX, p. 435 (illustrated in color on the cover). Other Notes: Painted in November, 1919. Accompanied by a letter confirming that this work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné issued by Wildenstein Institute, signed by Marc Restellini, dated December 3, 2001. Estimate $ 8,000,000-12,000,000
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