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Amedeo Modigliani

Italy (Livorno 1884 -  Parigi 1920 ) Wikipedia® : Amedeo Modigliani
MODIGLIANI Amedeo Portrait Du Fils Du Peintre Micheli

Bonhams /Nov 4, 2015
74,178.47 - 111,267.71
125,286.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
717

Some works of Amedeo Modigliani

Extracted between 717 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Amedeo Modigliani - Caryatide

Amedeo Modigliani - Caryatide

Original
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Lot number: 230
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Lot Description Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) Caryatide with the inscription 'Modigliani' (lower left) gouache, watercolour and blue wax crayon on paper 21 7/8 x 17 1/2 in. (55.6 x 44.4 cm.) Special Notice These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’’’’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. This VAT is not shown separately on the invoice. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction. Provenance Paul Guillaume, Paris. Joseph Brummer, New York. Mrs G. W. Fleming, New York, acquired from the above in November 1922, and thence by descent to the present owner. Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE NEW YORK COLLECTION Exhibited New York, Joseph Brummer, Works by Artists of Modern French School, November - December 1922, no. 14. View Lot Notes >
Amedeo Modigliani - Femme Accoudée

Amedeo Modigliani - Femme Accoudée

Original -
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Lot number: 180
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Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) Femme Accoudée (Portrait de Madame Zborowska) graphite on paper laid down on board, signed lower right 42.6 x 26 cm (16 3/4 x 10 1/4 in) Provenance: Madame Anka Zborowska, Paris. Galerie Zak, Paris (label on reverse). Ronauld Laaren, The Netherlands. Private Collection, Westchester, United States of America. Sale: Parke Bernet, New York, 13th May 1964, lot 11. Sale: Sotheby’’s, New York, 26th February 1990, lot 57a. Exhibited: Robinot Frères et Cie (label on reverse), Exposition de Stockholm, no. 37. Literature: Patani, Osvaldo, Amedeo Modigliani, Catalogo generale: Disegni 1906-1920, Milan, 1991, no. 124, illustrated. A photo-certificate from the Wildenstein Institute, Paris accompanies this work. This work is also recorded in the archives of Monsieur Christian Parisot. Note: Between the years 1917-18 and before working almost exclusively from his atelier Rue de la Grande Chaumiere, Amedeo Modigliani was a regular visitor to Mr & Mrs Zborowski. The Zborowskis were early patrons of the artist, and he regularly visited them in their apartment Rue Joseph Barra, usually for a few postprandial glasses of absinthe. It was in their salon between the hours of 2pm until the last of the afternoon light at 6.30pm that he drew portraits on paper gifted by Madame Zborowska. The Fine Art Sale: Part II Wednesday 25 November 2015, 2.00pm Ely House 37 Dover Street London W1S 4NJ Viewing Friday 20 November 10am-6pm Saturday 21 November 11am-4pm Sunday 22 November 11am-4pm Monday 23 November 10am-6pm Tuesday 24 November 10am-6pm Day of Sale from 10am
Amedeo Modigliani - Paul Alexandre, La Main Gauche Dans La Poche

Amedeo Modigliani - Paul Alexandre, La Main Gauche Dans La Poche

Original 1909
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Lot number: 175
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Amedeo Modigliani 1884 - 1920 PAUL ALEXANDRE, LA MAIN GAUCHE DANS LA POCHE Black crayon on paper 10 1/2 by 7 7/8 in. 26.7 by 20 cm Executed in 1909. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Dr. Paul Alexandre, Paris (acquired directly from the artist) Private Collection (by descent from the above and sold: Sotheby's, London, February 6, 2002, lot 140) Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Venice, Palazzo Grassi; London, The Royal Academy; Montreal, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Montréal; Rouen, Musée des Beaux-Arts & travelling, The Unknown Modigliani, Drawings from the Collection of Paul Alexandre, 1993-96, no. 409, illustrated in the catalogue Literature Carol Mann, Modigliani, London, 1980, no. 23, n.p. Osvaldo Patani, Amedeo Modigliani, Catalogo Generale, Disegni 1906-1920 con i disegni provenienti dalla collezione Paul Alexandre (1906-1914), Milan, 1994, no. 775, illustrated p. 349 Catalogue Note The present work is one in a series of drawings Modigliani made of his first and perhaps most important patron, Dr. Paul Alexandre. These drawings, in which the young doctor assumes more or less the same pose, appear to be studies for the three majestic portraits painted of Alexandre in 1909. After meeting the bohemian Italian artist in 1907, Alexandre commissioned him to execute portraits of his father and brother before sitting himself. The deep friendship that emerged between Modigliani and his young patron resulted in Alexandre's amassing of an astonishing collection of the artist’’s works over the course of the five years in which Modigliani was associated with the Alexandre family. The preservation of the many paintings and drawings from Alexandre’’s incredible personal collection, little-known to the public until after his death in 1968, permits a greater understanding of the masterful technique and skill of an artist for whom so few works remain today. Whether in stone or on paper, Modigliani’’s undeniably great portraits express, in a manner similar to that of his peers Matisse and Picasso, a novel sensitivity to his sitters, in which the artist transcends the mere naturalistic representation of the model in order to better embody him or her. With confident, vigorous strokes, Modigliani conveys the self-possessed and poised manner of the young doctor with whom he shared such a deep bond. Fig. 1 Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait of Dr. Paul Alexandre , 1909, oil on canvas, Collection Blaise Alexandre, Paris See More See Less
Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait Du Fils Du Peintre Micheli

Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait Du Fils Du Peintre Micheli

Original 1899
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Lot number: 108
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Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) Portrait du fils du peintre Micheli charcoal on paper 19 5/8 x 13 5/8 in (49.9 x 34.8 cm) Drawn in 1899 Footnotes Provenance Possibly Julie Schaalit, née Garsin (1910-2006), the artist's cousin, according to a label attached to the mount ('Modigliani N o 4174 av. cadre app t à M me. Schaalit'). Anon. sale, Guy Loudmer, Paris, 17 June 1989, lot 26. Kuniyoshi Museum, Japan. Private Collection, Japan. Exhibited Martigny, Fondation Pierre Gianadda, Exposition Modigliani , 19 June – 28 October 1990, no. 2 (illustrated pp. 76 and 207). Literature A. Ceroni and L. Piccioni, I dipinti di Modigliani , Milan, 1970, p. 85 (illustrated). A. Ceroni and F. Cachin, Tout l'oeuvre peint de Modigliani , Paris, 1972, p. 85 (illustrated). This lively and atmospheric portrait is one of Modigliani's earliest recorded works, probably drawn in 1899 while the artist was still living in Livorno. The sitter is traditionally identified as the son of the painter Guglielmo Micheli (1866-1926), Modigliani's first teacher. The steady gaze and arrogant comportment of the sitter, together with the set of the shoulders apparently half turned to the easel, raise the possibility that it is in fact a self-portrait. At the very least the young artist attributes to his sitter the characteristics that he would most like to exhibit himself. The technique is typical of the traditional Nineteenth Century Academic training, familiar from the portrait drawings of Courbet or Corot, but the bravado and optimism of youth suggest an artist who was keen to explore the possibilities of the century about to begin. At about the same time, but across the Ligurian Sea from Livorno in Barcelona, Picasso was also emerging from his academic training, using traditional techniques and already exhibiting modern tendencies, in drawings such as the Autoportrait aux chats . Modigliani was born into a moderately prosperous family in Livorno, the youngest of four children of Flaminio Modigliani and Eugenia, née Garsin. His father's family had a long and distinguished history as merchants with interests in mines and timber concessions in Sardinia and Tuscany, while his mother's origins were French with many relations still living around Marseille. Although the family does not appear to have been overtly religious they identified with the long history of Sephardic settlement around the Mediterranean, and it was with this tradition that Modigliani proudly identified when he later habitually introduced himself as 'Le Juif Modigiani'. Amedeo's birth coincided with a dramatic downturn in Modigliani's father's business, although the birth itself had the unexpected effect of staving off eviction: according to local law, the arrival of a new son or daughter meant that creditors could not evict the family from their home to take control of their assets. Modigliani suffered several bouts of serious illness, including typhoid fever and pleurisy, which would later become tuberculosis. As a result he was largely educated at home by his mother, creating a strong bond that continued throughout his life. In these periods of confinement he began to draw, and as soon as he regained his strength he was sent as a pupil to Micheli's studio. The latter had trained under the Tuscan Macchiaioli painter Giovanni Fattori, and was able to give his new pupil a grounding in the techniques favored by the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. The present work bears a label indicating the ownership of a Madame Schaalit. In 1990 Patrice Chaplin traced Modigliani's cousin Julie, daughter of Eugenia Garsin's brother, to the suburbs of Paris where she had married a Monsieur Schaalit (P. Chaplin, Into the darkness laughing: the story of Modigliani's last mistress, Jeanne Hébuterne , London, 1990, pp. 17-18). It seems entirely likely that this drawing had been retained by Modigliani's mother after his departure for Paris, and that it had remained in the family.
Amedeo Modigliani - Paulette Jourdain

Amedeo Modigliani - Paulette Jourdain

Original 1919
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Lot number: 12
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Amedeo Modigliani 1884 - 1920 PAULETTE JOURDAIN Signed Modigliani (lower right) Oil on canvas 39 1/2 by 25 3/4 in. 100.3 by 65.4 cm Painted circa 1919. Please note that in the print catalogue for this sale, this lot appears as number 12T. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Leopold Zborowski, Paris (acquired from the artist) Paul Guillaume, Paris (acquired from the above) L.C. Hodebert, (Galerie Barbazagnes), Paris Marcel Fleischmann, Zurich (1931 and until at least 1939) Justin K. Thannhauser, New York (acquired from the above by 1941) Mr. & Mrs. M.L. Hermanos, New York (acquired from the above by 1959) Private Collection, United States Acquavella Galleries, New York Acquired from the above by A. Alfred Taubman in September 1983 Exhibited Galerie Marcel Bernheim, Paris, Amedeo Modigliani, 1931, no. 22 (as dating from 1918) San Francisco, Palace of Fine Arts, Golden Gate International Exhibition, 1939 Cleveland Museum of Art, Modigliani and Soutine Exhibition, 1951 New York, Museum of Modern Art, 20th Century Painting, 1951 The Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati Art Museum; The Arts Club of Chicago & Milwaukee Arts Center, Modigliani, 1959, no. 17, illustrated in the catalogue (as dating from circa 1917) New York, Acquavella Galleries, Inc., XIX & XX Century Master Paintings, 1983, no. 11, illustrated in the catalogue New York, The Jewish Museum, Modigliani, Beyond the Myth, 2004, no. 80, illustrated in color in the catalogue London, Royal Academy of Arts, Modigliani and His Models, 2006, no. 50, illustrated in color in the catalogue Literature Maud Dale, Modigliani, New York, 1929, no. 29 Arthur Pfannstiel, Modigliani, Paris, 1929, illustrated opposite p. 112 (as dating from 1917) Adolphe Basler, Modigliani, Paris, 1931, no. 20 Ambrogio Ceroni, Amedeo Modigliani, Milan, 1965, no. 217, illustrated Joseph Lanthemann, Modigliani, Catalogue Raisonné, Sa vie, son Oeuvre complet, son art, Barcelona, 1970, no. 411, illustrated p. 268 Leone Piccioni & Ambrogio Ceroni, Modigliani, Milan, 1970, illustrated in color pl. LXII Carol Mann, Modigliani, London, 1980, no. 145, illustrated p. 199 Thérèse Castieau-Barrielle, La vie et l'oeuvre de Amedeo Modigliani, Paris, 1987, illustrated in color p. 202 Christian Parisot, Modigliani, Catalogue Raisonné, Peintures, Dessins, Aquarelles, vol. II, Rome, 1991, no. 20/1919, illustrated p. 249 Osvaldo Patani, Amedeo Modigliani, Catalogo Generale, Milan, 1991, no. 345, illustrated in color p. 334 Christian Parisot, Modigliani, Catalogue Raisonné, vol. V, Siena, 2012, no. 20/1919, illustrated in color Catalogue Note One of the last paintings created by Modigliani, the portrait of Paulette Jourdain is an outstanding example of the artist’’s work. Pauline “Paulette” Jourdain was the housemaid and later the lover of Modigliani’’s dealer Léopold Zborowski. She is painted on one of the largest canvases used by the artist in a completely frontal, stately manner that directly engages the viewer. She is presented with great dignity and presence, commanding our attention and respect. The rich colors, transcendent light and dynamic surface further transform this painting into a masterwork. The painting demonstrates well how the artist assimilated a broad range of influences from African art to Old Master paintings to create his own unique, sophisticated vision. Modigliani was famous during his lifetime, having exhibited internationally in Paris, London, Zurich and New York, and being written about by the leading writers and art critics of his time. His fame was firmly established by the time that he created this painting in 1919. During the first half of the year, while living in the south, Modigliani visited Pierre-Auguste Renoir in Cagnes who agreed to meet him because “I have heard that he is a great painter” (Jeanne Modigliani, Modigliani: Man and Myth, New York, 1958, p.79). Modigliani returned to Paris on May 31 and painted Paulette Jourdain that fall, probably in November, when he executed the Portrait of Thora Klinkowström (private collection), which features the same format, composition and color scheme. At the time that Modigliani finished these paintings, the English writer Wyndham Lewis referred to him in the London journal The Atheneum as being “the best-respected painter in Paris” (Wyndham Lewis on Art: Collected Writings, 1913-1956, New York, 1969, p.167). Within weeks, on January 24, 1920, Modigliani died. Modigliani was an exceptional colorist who created a rich, distinctive palette that is seen to advantage in the portrait of Paulette Jourdain: the wall is bright ochre yellow, the wainscoting is orange-brown while the door is reddish-brown, all colors unique to him. He was surely inspired to explore color by Paul Gauguin’’s work, which “fascinated” him when he and fellow artist Ludwig Meidner saw the Post-Impressionist’’s retrospective at the Salon d’’ Automne in 1906. The experience left him “intoxicated with excitement.” The studio in which Paulette Jourdain was painted was located directly above an atelier once occupied by Gauguin, at 8, rue de la Grande Chaumière in the heart of Montparnasse. As with many of Modigliani’’s paintings, brushstrokes are readily apparent in Paulette Jourdain, making for a dynamic, busy surface. He wanted to move as far away as possible from the slick, sterile canvases of the academic painters who preceded him. Along with Matisse and Picasso, Modigliani incorporated elements of African art into his paintings, thereby revolutionizing Western art. The influence of African masks is evident in Modigliani’’ s portrayal of Paulette’’s face: the long oval shape of her head, blank eyes, long nose, button mouth and extended neck. Her elongated form and frontal pose give her the hieratic presence of a totem. His friend Jacques Lipchitz commented that it was African art’’s “strange and novel forms” that captivated Modigliani. Other artistic influences can be discerned as well, from Old Masters to contemporaries. Modigliani admired the Italian Renaissance Master Fra Angelico, whose figures seem to have an inner light, and he painted Paulette’’s skin with iridescent luminosity. The work of Leonardo da Vinci appealed to him as well. Modigliani remarked to Paulette that the “Mona Lisa” was his favorite painting at the Louvre, an institution that he often frequented. Modigliani gives Paulette an enigmatic look, akin to that of the Mona Lisa. Her face also has a caricatural quality that recalls the portraits of Henri Rousseau. Modigliani visited Rousseau’’s studio in Montparnasse with his patron Dr. Paul Alexandre and was a great admirer of the Douanier’’s paintings. Sharp angles in the background introduce a subtle form of Cubism into the painting through the positioning of the figure: in a chair in a corner, next to a door (that is slightly ajar), in front of a wall that is divided by wainscoting. The angular elements behind her contrast with the flowing, curvilinear lines of her form. While not formally one of the Cubists, Modigliani was part of their social circle. He met Picasso soon after arriving in Paris and made several portraits of him (one in paint, two in pencil). They exhibited together on numerous occasions. Modigliani had deep respect for Picasso, according to his intimates. On Modigliani’’s obsession with representing the human figure, Lipchitz explained: “He could never forget his interest in people, and he painted them, so to say, with abandon, urged on by the intensity of his feeling and vision.” As the writer Jean Cocteau wrote, “He reduced us all to his type, to the vision within, and he usually preferred to paint faces conforming to the physiognomy he required…for Modigliani’’s portraits, even his self-portraits, are not the reflection of his external observation, but of his internal vision…” The sitter, Paulette Jourdain (1904-1997), was born in the small coastal town of Concarneau in Brittany. She came to Paris in the first part of 1919 and moved into Zborowski’’s apartment at 3, rue Joseph Bara in Montparnasse to work, first as a domestic servant before quickly becoming an assistant in the Pole’’s dealer operations. She also took courses at a local commercial school. Zborowski operated his business out of his apartment because he did not have a gallery until 1926. It was at the apartment that Paulette met Modigliani who immediately invited her to come to his studio/apartment on rue de la Grande Chaumière to have her portrait painted. Paulette remembered that there were multiple sittings and that Modigliani painted quickly. Modigliani’’s portraits of young people, including this one of Paulette Jourdain, are among his most poignant paintings. Youths emerged as an especially popular subject for him in the years 1918 to 1919. The young people whom he portrayed often came from humble backgrounds with many being servants, workers or peasants. A major part of Modigliani’’s enduring appeal lies in the fact that he ennobled common people by painting them in large formats with grandeur and majesty. It is no surprise then that many of these paintings are in museum collections: The Little Peasant (Tate Gallery, London), Boy in Short Pants (Dallas Museum of Art) and Servant Girl (Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo). Paulette Jourdain has always been among Modigliani’’ s most prominent portraits of young people. While his other youthful sitters have faded into anonymity, Paulette has not. Her name has always remained in the title. Modigliani was clearly taken with her for he wished to paint another portrait of her, but his rapidly declining health and untimely death prevented that from happening. Paulette soon posed for other artists as well, including Chaim Soutine and Moise Kisling. She remained close to Zborowski and had a child by him in 1924 named Jacqueline. Paulette took over operations of Zborowski’’s gallery upon his premature death in 1932 from a heart attack and continued as a gallerist until WWII. Modigliani embodied the very essence of Montparnasse, a place which Marcel Duchamp called, “the first really international group of artists that we ever had.” He was known as the ultimate Montparnasse sophisticate, someone who was highly cultured, well read and well traveled. Paulette recalled that Modigliani sang parts of the Italian opera “La Traviata” when he painted her and that he would recite verses by the French poet Charles Baudelaire. Remarkably, Modigliani’’s style matured at the same time that his health declined. Perhaps he knew that his end was near and that he needed to push himself to the highest level to secure his legacy. Within his generation, he stood with Matisse and Picasso as the only artists who created world-class works in three media: painting, sculpture and drawing. Dr. Kenneth Wayne, Director The Modigliani Project Sotheby's would like to thank Dr. Kenneth Wayne assisting with the cataloguing of this painting. Fig. 1 Modigliani in his studio circa 1915 Fig. 2 Amedeo Modigliani, Jeanne Hébuterne , 1919, oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Nate B. Spingold Fig. 3 Jeanne Hébuterne, 1919 See More See Less
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