Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Joan Miró

Spain (Barcellona 1893 -  Palma De Maiorca 1983 ) Wikipedia® : Joan Miró
Miró Joan Tête

Bonhams /Nov 14, 2017
129,421.92 - 172,562.55
In progress

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Joan Miró at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert

 

Variants on Artist's name :

Juan Mirò

Miro' Joan

Miiro Juan

 

Artworks in Arcadja
16599

Some works of Joan Miró

Extracted between 16,599 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Joan Miró - L\’anneau (the Ring)

Joan Miró - L\’anneau (the Ring)

Original 1961
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 101
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: Joan Miro (1893-1983) L\’Anneau (The Ring), 1961 Lithograph From the numbered edition of 90 Signed and numbered on recto Sheet L 37 x 26 inches; Framed: 40 x 30.5 inches Condition: vertical handling creases at upper left and upper right hand corners; foxing at upper left region Categories: Condition: No Entry
Joan Miró - Miró

Joan Miró - Miró

Original 1964
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 339
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Miró. Obra inèdita recent. Barcelona: Sala Gaspar, Galeria Metras and Belarte, December 11, 1964. 11 original colored lithographs by Joan Miró in a paper folder (not bound). Edition of 1000 copies (copy not numbered). Dimensions: 30 X22 cm. Good condition (minor wear and tear to corners, slight wear to the cover).
Joan Miró - Bon Cop...de Lluna

Joan Miró - Bon Cop...de Lluna

Original 1979
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 320
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
BON COP...DE LLUNA Joan Miró 1893 - 1983 Gouache, pencil and felt-tip penover lithograph on paper 40 1/2 by 28 7/8 in. 103 by 73.1 cm Executed in 1979. Provenance Damià Caus Musons, Barcelona Private Collection, Spain (acquired from the above and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 23, 2011, lot 270) Acquired at the above sale Catalogue Note Joan Miró's Bon cop...de lluna is a striking example of the artist's mature work, characterized by both the black outlines and the thick applications of black ink. The dynamism of the present work—where moon and stars are set against a blank background with ink spatter reminiscent of the abstract expressionists—fully captures the energy and boldness that Miró embraced in the last decade of his life. On June 18, 1978, in an interview with Santiago Amón, discussing recent works on canvas Miró stated, "I painted these paintings in a frenzy, with real violence, so people will know that I'm alive, that I'm breathing, that I still have a few more places to go. I'm heading in a new direction" (Margit Rowell, ed., Joan Miró: Selected Writings and Interviews, Boston, 1986, p. 301). While the new directions and boldness of his late works are clearly visible in the present composition, one also finds Miró's traditional pictorial lexicon of signs and symbols. Stars, moon, woman, bird and sun all formed a poetic language that he implemented throughout his lifetime. Margit Rowell expands on the driving force behind Miró's work: "What was important to Miró was the immediacy of his images, that they be impulsive, corrosive, eruptive, emptied of conventional meanings or allusions and purified to a primordial presence" (Margit Rowell, ed., 1986,ibid.,p. 10). His interest in primitive art as well as the art theory and anthropology based around this art in the 1920s and 1930s contributed to his pictorial language.
Joan Miró - Tête

Joan Miró - Tête

Original 1968
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 21
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Joan Miró (1893-1983) Tête signed and numbered 'Miró 2/2' and with foundry mark 'Parellada' (back of the base) bronze with original patination 21 1/2 in (54.1 cm) (height) Conceived in 1968 and cast between 1968 and 1973 by the Fundició Parellada, Barcelona, in an edition of two plus one artists proof and one nominative proof Footnotes Provenance Galerie Maeght, Paris. William A. Seavey (acquired from the above on 23 December 1980). Literature J.J. Sweeney, Joan Miró, Barcelona, 1970, p. 166-7. J. Dupin, Miró escultor, Barcelona, 1972, p. 167. A. Jouffroy and J. Teixidor, Miró Sculptures, Paris, 1980, p. 49, no. 93. Fundació Joan Miró, Obra de Joan Miró, Barcelona, 1988, p. 412, no. 1510. E.F. Miró and P.O. Chapel, Joan Miró, Sculptures. Catalogue raisonné 1928-1982, Paris, 2006, p. 126, no. 114. The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by ADOM. Miró's sculpture took a radical new direction in the early 1960's under the influence of his French dealer Aimé Maeght. In particular, he began to think in terms of outdoor settings, developing a unique visual language using assembled found objects which were then cast in bronze. He also took particular care to work on the patina at the foundry himself, considering it of equivalent importance to the surface of a painting, ensuring that his creative vision was realized exactly as he intended. Cast in 1968 at the Parellada foundry in Barcelona, Tête is a characteristic example of the artist's ability to create evocative and exotic creatures. Assembled from unidentifiable objects, the sculpture retains a rough, unfinished and ancient look, seeming to blend into the surrounding landscape like the Moai of Easter Island. One of Miro's great strengths is his capacity to alter the function of an object and give it a new purpose and meaning. The present work is a testament to this ability. Although Tête is an assemblage of various unrelated objects, the viewer is naturally inclined to interpret it as a face. It is only on a careful examination that the elements present themselves, coyly revealing their previous functions. Joan Miró's interest in sculpture was first encouraged by Francesc d'Assís Galí i Fabra, his professor at the progressive Escola d'Art Galí in Barcelona. Miró recalled: 'Galí was a remarkable teacher. He gave me an exercise so that I would learn to 'see' form: He blindfolded me, and placed objects in my hands, then he asked me to draw the objects without having seen them." (quoted in Miró Sculptures, exhib. cat., Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, 1992, p. 33). Although sculpture became a more dominant element in his output in the later 1940's, Miró had always worked in three dimensions. Before beginning a painting, he would sometimes consider the composition in terms of volumes, as if the education he had received from Galí had trained him to start with sculpture as the basis for a flat work of art. Miró arrived in Paris in 1920, when Dada was at its height, making the natural move to André Breton's Surrealist orbit from 1922. He presented his first sculpted works in a Surrealist vein at the Salon des Surindépendents. In the 1930's, in common with other Surrealist artists he began to use everyday or unexpected objects gathered into three-dimensional assemblages. Although his postwar work does not exactly follow this practice, the influence of this earlier period can certainly be discerned. Whether at his small farmhouse at Montroig, south of Barcelona, or in Mallorca, Miró picked up objects during his walks in the countryside or at the beach, later transforming them in the studio: 'when sculpting, I start from the objects I collect, just as I make use of stains on paper and imperfections in canvases ... I make a cast of these objects and work on it like Gonzales does until the object as such no longer exists but becomes a sculpture.' (J. Miró quoted in M. Rowell, ed., Joan Miró: Selected Writings and Interviews, Boston, 1986, p. 175). Miró's rambling walks were a central element in his inspiration, and he found it essential to be close to nature, sometimes even painting directly onto stones so that he could directly mark the landscape that surrounded him. 'May my sculptures be confused with elements of nature, trees, rocks, roots, mountains, plants, flowers. [I will] build myself a studio in the middle of the countryside, very spacious, with a facade that blends into the earth... and now and then take my sculptures outdoors so they blend into the landscape.' (ibid., p. 175). Although he was trying to create a natural environment, Miró was also keen to liberate the imagination by producing a body of work that was humorous and 'a truly phantasmagoric world of living monsters' (ibid., p. 175). His studio was to give the impression of 'entering a new world' that would allow him to 'feel as though he was going inside the earth and that his work would come out more natural and spontaneous' (ibid., pp. 175 and 190). As he wrote to Pierre Matisse, his dealer in New York, his aim was to 'transport you into a world of real unreality'' (ibid., p. 135).
Joan Miró - Femmes, Oiseaux, Étoiles

Joan Miró - Femmes, Oiseaux, Étoiles

Original 1942
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 16
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
FEMMES, OISEAUX, ÉTOILES Senior Administrator +1 212 606 7360 Joan Miró Signed Miró (lower right); signed Joan Miró, titled Femmes, oiseaux, étoiles, inscribed Palma majorque and dated 25.5.1942(on the verso) Pencil, pastel and gouache on paper 15 1/2 by 18 1/8 in. 39.3 by 46 cm Executed on May 25, 1942. Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Or Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York E.V. Thaw & Co., New York Literature Jacques Dupin& Ariane Lelong-Mainaud, Joan Miró, Catalogue raisonné,Drawings,Paris, 2010, vol. II, no. 955,illustrated in color p. 86 Femmes, oiseau, étoileswas executed on May 25, 1942, at a time when Miró was rapidly gaining widespread international acclaim. Populated with highly stylized and abstracted figures, the present work utilizes the vocabulary of signs developed a few years earlier in his celebratedConstellationsseries. Writing about Miró's production of 1942 and 1943, which consisted almost exclusively of works on paper, Jacques Dupin commented: \“They are explorations undertaken with no preconceived idea – effervescent creations in which the artist perfected a vast repertory of forms, signs, and formulas, bringing into play all the materials and instruments compatible with paper. These works permit us to follow the alchemist at work, for errors and oversights are found side by side with the most unexpected triumphs and happy spontaneous discoveries. The object of all these explorations is to determine the relationship between drawing and the materials, the relationship between line and space. The artist is not so much interested in expressing something with appropriate technique, as in making the material express itself in its own way. Successively, on the same sheet, black pencil and India ink, watercolor and pastel, gouache and thinned oil paint, colored crayons... are employed, and their contrasts and similarities exploited to the full, and not infrequently exploited beyond their capacities\” (J. Dupin,Joan Miró, Life and Work, London, 1962, p. 372). The present work exemplifies the expressive power of images, even though they bear no faithful resemblance to the natural world. Miró is solely reliant upon the pictorial lexicon of signs and symbols that he developed over the years. A technique of primary importance in this painting is Miró\’s expressive and exquisite use of line. Overall, his remarkable visual vocabulary strikes a perfect balance between abstraction and image-signs. His pictures from the mid-1940s are characterized by a sense of energy and movement; there is never a sense of stasis. Moreover, each work is the result of active and ongoing improvisation that renders a precise interpretation impossible. In fact, it was these compositions from the mid-1940s that would inspire the creative production of the Abstract Expressionist artists in New York. A few years after he executed this work, the artist offered creative advice to young painters, and his comments are an insight into the underlying motivations that inspired the present work: \‘He who wants to really achieve something has to flee from things that are easy and pay no attention to… artistic bureaucracy, which is completely lacking in spiritual concerns. What is more absurd than killing yourself to copy a highlight on a bottle? If that was all painting was about, it wouldn\’t be worth the effort\’ (quoted in M. Rowell,Joan Miró, Selected Writings and Interviews, Boston, 1986, p. 226). Fig. 1 Joan Miró, Femme et oiseaux, 1940, gouache and oil wash on paper, sold: Sotheby\’s, London, June 21, 2017 for $31,118,604 Fig. 2 Joan Miró on his Studio Roof, Montroig, Spain in 1948, photograph by Irving Penn Fig. 3 Joan Miró on his Studio Roof, Montroig, Spain in 1948, photograph by Irving Penn
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr