Tyeb Mehta

India (19252009 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Tyeb Mehta
MEHTA Tyeb Untitled

Bonhams /Apr 23, 2013
472,004.37 - 708,006.55
493,164.00

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Artworks in Arcadja
97

Some works of Tyeb Mehta

Extracted between 97 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Original
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Lot number: 256
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TYEB MEHTA (1925-2009) Untitled (Woman and Bird) signed 'Tyeb' (lower right); further signed 'Tyeb' (upper right) and bearing 'Chemould' label (on the reverse) oil on board 40 1/8 x 30¾ in. (102 x 78 cm.) Painted circa 1960s Gallery Chemould, Mumbai Saffronart, 16 May 2003, lot 59 R. Hoskote et. al., Tyeb Mehta: Ideas Images Exchanges, New Delhi, 2005, p. 69 (illustrated)
Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Original 1998
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Lot number: 102
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Lot Description TYEB MEHTA (1925-2009) Untitled signed and dated 'Tyeb 98' (upper right) oil pastel on paper 25½ x 19 5/8 in. (64.8 x 49.8 cm.) Executed in 1998 Provenance Sotheby's New York, 18 March 2009, lot 120 Related Features Gallery Talk: Highlights from the South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art Sale [ Video ] Tyeb Mehta's Untitled (Mahishasura) [ Video ] Gallery Talk: Works by Syed Haider Raza [ Video ]
Tyeb Mehta - Head

Tyeb Mehta - Head

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 70
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TYEB MEHTA (1925-2009) Head titled and inscribed 'Head Graphite 34 x 28' (on the reverse) graphite on sandpaper 13½ x 11¼ in. (34 x 28.5 cm.) Tyeb Mehta: Triumph of Vision, exhibition catalogue, New Delhi, 2011, p. 16 (illustrated) New Delhi, Vadehra Art Gallery, Tyeb Mehta: Triumph of Vision, January - February 2011
Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Original
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Net Price
Lot number: 420
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Tyeb Mehta (India, 1925-2009) Untitled , oil on canvas, signed and dated Tyeb 78 on reverse, framed, 150.4 x 120.1cm (59 3/16 x 47 5/16in). This work is part of the Diagonal series. This work has been authenticated by Tyeb Mehta Foundation . Provenance : Private Collection; acquired directly from the artist in 1980 from his studio in Bombay. Across a six-decade-long career, Tyeb Mehta distilled a vocabulary of compelling archetypal images from the flux of experience. Among these were the trussed bull struggling with his fate, the falling figure suspended in a luminous void, the goddess and the buffalo-demon locked in mortal combat, the rickshaw-puller fused with his vehicle, and the figure wielding yet torn apart by a diagonal that could be read as a thunderbolt or a device of planar scission. This untitled work from 1978 is an early and powerful example of what would soon be recognised as Mehta's mature style. From the 1970s onward, he would render his figures as a series of staccato sections in flat planes of colour, often at odds with one another, as though they were multiple selves liberating themselves from a single body. I have written, elsewhere, that each of Mehta's paintings acts as a "silent movie, in which we see mouths screaming, faces, distended in terror, flailing limbs, thrashing wings". His paintings point to the splintering apart and potential re-integration of the individual mind, society, and the world at large; as viewers, we must read the clues and divine the psychic and political meanings of the work. A major contributor to the tradition of Indian modernism, Mehta was closely associated with the pioneering Progressive Artists Group. Although he was born in Bombay and spent most of his life there, an especially productive phase of his career was staged in New Delhi, where he lived from 1965 to 1979. He played an active role in the Indian capital's lively art scene during those years, together with friends and colleagues like Ebrahim Alkazi, Krishen Khanna, Ram Kumar and A Ramachandran, as well as the redoubtable and nomadic M F Husain. It is to this Delhi phase of activity that the present painting belongs. In this work, we see to advantage the celebrated diagonal that first made its appearance in Mehta's art in 1969. As the artist himself told the tale, he found the device intuitively rather than arriving at it through reflection: one day, frustrated with a painting that had refused to resolve itself, he picked up a brush loaded with black paint and slashed it across the canvas. The anecdote conveys the intensity of Mehta's conceptual struggle at the time. He wished to escape the stable, well-centred figures he had been painting, without abandoning the figure as the key pictorial bearer of human destiny. At the same time, he wanted his frames to resonate with the fragmentation that coloured contemporary experience, to carry the anguish of shattered certitudes in a decade when the world seemed to be drifting towards nuclear confrontation, India had departed from the ideals of its liberation struggle, and South Asia was ripped apart by the antagonism between India and Pakistan. Mehta's diagonal may be contextualised within a specific history. The most essential function of the diagonal is to effect a partition of space that was homogenous until the making of this gesture, into two related but separate parts. The echo of the 1947 Partition of British India reverberates in this slashing, arbitrary gesture. The Partition placed Mehta's generation of South Asian Muslims under the fragmenting pressure of having to choose between an ancestral homeland and a new collective ideal, a traditionally hybrid cultural identity and a new identity premised exclusively on religion. The diagonal simultaneously emphasises separation and twinning: it expresses the psychology of schism that haunted Mehta, proposing a doubling of consciousness and an awareness of difference-within-belonging at several levels, indicating the minority bracketed within the majority, and the artist within a larger public. Ranjit Hoskote Independent Curator and Author of Images of Transcendence: Towards a New Reading of Tyeb Mehta's Art in Ideas Images Exchanges by Tyeb Mehta, Ranjit Hoskote and Roshan Shahani
Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Tyeb Mehta - Untitled

Original 1967
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Gross Price
Lot number: 54
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TYEB MEHTA (1925-2009) Untitled signed and dated 'Tyeb 67' (upper left) oil on canvas 47 7/8 x 37 1/8 in. (121.6 x 94.3 cm.) Painted in 1967 Acquired directly from the artist in 1970 Thence by descent The previous owners were introduced to Krishen Khanna and subsequently Tyeb Mehta while visiting New Delhi in 1970. From the previous owner's memoirs: "The next day Krishen Khanna brought many of his canvases, all very large, out onto the sun-lit terrace, and after recording some of them on slides, we settled on the portrait of Ali Akbar Khan, the great sitarist and teacher of Ravi Shankar. The painting was to be delivered in New York by Krishen after a show that he had scheduled in London. Krishen also urged us to visit the studio of another artist, named Tyeb Mehta, who lived nearby. Tyeb was a struggling young artist [...] we offered to buy one of [his paintings of] an anguished female figure we called the "Green Lady". Tyeb was coming to the States on a Rockefeller Foundation fellowship and promised to deliver the painting when he came, which happened about a year later. These two paintings are important to us not only because we love art, but also because of the precious memories that they elicit." Property from a Private Collection, Florida Tyeb Mehta's Untitled figure preserves and anticipates a transition in his oeuvre. Painted a year before Tyeb travelled to New York on the Rockefeller Foundation grant in 1968, this work is the culmination of his earlier period. "Through the 1950s and 1960s, Tyeb practiced a harsh, brushy textured, impasto-laden expressionism aligned with the School of Paris models cherished by his generation of Indian artists [...] Later during the mid-1960s, he passed on to a freer handling from a painterly viewpoint; he seemed to conjure his figures from flame and cloud". (R. Hoskote, Tyeb Mehta, Images and Exchanges, Delhi, 2005, p. 5). The increasingly stylized sitting figure retains Tyeb's typically gestural treatment of form whilst the textural roughness, ever-present in earlier work, recedes. Tyeb's abstracted figure appears monumental, rendered substantial and sculptural against the flat background of subtle tonalities. The single figure fractured and tormented is a rhetorical reiteration of the artists career long concern for the human condition. The writings of French Existentialists, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Andr Gide and Andr Malraux fuelled Tyeb's obsession with fate and the decrepitude of human existence. "These gurus of the age informed Tyeb and his contemporaries in their understanding of human vulnerability, the scope of choice available within the limitations imposed by social convention, [and] the degrees of freedom that the individual could wrest from the realm of necessity." (R. Hoskote, Tyeb Mehta, Images and Exchanges, Delhi, 2005, p. 6) Tyeb Mehta's Untitled figure is one of his last works in this gestural figuration but reaffirms the existential iteration of the human condition that he would dominate his paintings for years to come.
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