Vicente Silva Manansala

Philippines (19101981 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Vicente Silva Manansala
MANANSALA Vicente Silva The Bird Seller

Christie's /May 27, 2012
40,406.59 - 55,559.06
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
74

Some works of Vicente Silva Manansala

Extracted between 74 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Vicente Silva Manansala - Still Life

Vicente Silva Manansala - Still Life

Original 1966
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Lot number: 344
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Sotheby's Singapore, October 22 2006, Lot 63 Acquired by the Present Owner from the Above Sale Private Collection, Taiwan 344 Vicente Silva Manansala 1910-1981 STILL LIFE Signed and dated 66 Oil on canvas 63.5 by 86.5 cm.; 25 by 34 in. Estimate 300,000 - 500,000 HKD Print The work is in good condition overall, as is the canvas, which is clear and taut. There is indication of light wear and handling around the edges of the painting, along with minuscule media accretion located on the top center section, which is only visible upon close observation. Examination under ultraviolet light shows a thin line along the top right margin (approximately 9 inches long), but not visible to the naked eye. Framed.
Vicente Silva Manansala -  Young Girl With Cigar

Vicente Silva Manansala - Young Girl With Cigar

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 151
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Description:
VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (Filipino, 1910-1981) Young Girl with Cigar signed 'Manansala 72' (upper left) charcoal on paper 70 x 101 cm. (27 1/2 x 39 3/4 in.) Painted in 1972 维参特.马南萨拉 拿着雪茄的女生 炭笔 画布纸 1972年作 款识:Manansala 72 (左上) From the collection of Ambassador JV Cruz Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Medium should read: charcoal on paper Foremost modernist Vicente Manansala is highly celebrated for his pioneering style of 'transparent cubism'. A significant part of his career was dedicated to his charcoal on paper works of young female sitters in the nude. From Greco-Roman classicism to French salon painters, the art of the nude has been widely acknowledged as one of the most challenging forms put to an artist. It requires a high degree of anatomical precision and a refined execution. When combined with Manansala's penchant for cubist-modernism, this becomes doubly challenging. Manansala's nudes are beautifully rendered odes to the female form. Within their reclining limbs, arched backs and Raphaelite silhouettes, he portrays also the geometric outlines of his cubist influences; carefully shaded with charcoal to create interlocking gradients of warm chiaroscuro hues. Young Girl with a Cigar (Lot 151) is one of the most refined and complete nude studies created by Manansala. It portrays a full-bodied female seen from a frontal perspective, lying in complete abandon upon a couch. Manansala usually painted his sitters from the side or back views and front views are extremely rare. Although her outspread limbs appear to reflect the attitude of sleep, it also appears that the young girl has been smoking - possibly a rolled marijuana cigar, leading to her drugged stupor. Painted in 1972, the same year as the explosive, six foot wide study: Group of Nude Figures, it is likely the girl was a hedonistic party attendee instead of one of the young debutantes who often modelled for the artist.
Vicente Silva Manansala - Fish Vendor

Vicente Silva Manansala - Fish Vendor

Original 1969
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Net Price
Lot number: 59
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Description:
59 Vicente Manansala 1910 - 1981 Fish Vendor Signed (front) and dated 1969 (verso) Oil on canvas 9" x 7" (22.86cm x 17.78cm) P 140,000 Provenance: A gift from the artist to Jose Guevarra. Acquired from the above by the present owner. Literature: A. Aparicio, O.P., editor, Lumina Pandit : A Collection of Historical Treasures, Manila, 2010, p. 406 Contained in a beautifully intricate wooden frame, this depiction of a fish vendor in oil-on-board is classic Manansala. It showcases his signature melding of rural romanticism and urban chaos, employing his signature transparent cubism, a style he personally developed where shapes and figures in different degrees of faintness brilliantly overlap to magically create human forms and atmosphere. This particular piece was a gift by the artist to the revered journalist Jose "Joe" Guevarra whose column at the Manila Bulletin is considered an institution in Philippine publishing. The National Artist's signature appears in the work itself and at the back.
Vicente Silva Manansala - The Bird Seller

Vicente Silva Manansala - The Bird Seller

Original 1976
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Lot number: 2135
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (Filipino, 1910-1981) The Bird Seller signed and dated 'Manansala 76' (upper right) oil on canvas 61 x 91 cm. (24 x 35 3/4 in.) Painted in 1976 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Private Collection, Asia View Lot Notes › "Picasso painted Les Demoiselles d'Avignon in 1907, three years before Manansala was born. Cubism did not curtail the dimension of Manansala's vision. He enriched the style and gave it a new context. Above all, he gave it a new sense of place." Rodolfo Paras-Perez, Manansala, Manila, 1980, p. 75 The Bird Seller (Lot 2135) by master modernist Vicente Manansala is an iconic work, contributing significantly towards the visual development of cubism in Asia. Painted in 1976, when Manansala had gained full mastery over his definitive style of "Translucent Cubism", it holds a place amongst some of the finest compositions of Manansala's career along with the other works of its ilk - localised market scenes of duck eggs "balut" vendors, fruit and vegetable sellers, and "sabungeros". Manansala was twelve years old when Fernando Amorsolo, the acknowledged leading painter of the Spanish school, first developed his idyllic pastoral landscapes bathed in effervescent tropical light. As a young art student, Manansala too adopted the vocabulary of genre scenes, painting rice fields and beautiful peasant girls. However this soon changed as he became fascinated with how geometric shapes could cohere to develop a recognisable image, maintaining more expressionistic integrity than rendered by a purely realistic technique. In 1950, he was awarded a bursary by the French legation and spent a period at Fernand L?ger's atelier, learning from the master himself. Eventually, after developing the artistic confidence which his later works bear witness to, he abandoned their influences and devoted himself to developing his own cubist methodologies which permitted the flexibility and freedom to articulate a truly Filipino context. In his own words, Manansala affirmed: "When I say I am a cubist, I mean that I have taken Cubism's basic elements, reorganized them and added my own, creating my own style." Manansala also spent a period studying Chinese brush painting during the late 1950s, learning from a Chinese painter based in Manila and visiting Hong Kong artists. Through the effort of painting shrimps floating delicately weightlessly in a pool, swaying bamboos, and also inscribing calligraphy, Manansala discovered the utility of using a few essential lines to capture depth and form. This gave his works from the 1960s onwards a lightness, radiance and the "translucency" for which he was most acclaimed. Eventually Manansala was to rise to the fore as the Philippines' most significant modern painter, focusing on subjects close to home and heart. The Bird Seller reflects all these unique qualities and influences, depicting a local vendor of tropical birds crouched under the heavy burden of his pole lying across his shoulders. Around him sway a myriad of geometric bird cages, creating layers of textural steppes across the pictorial surface. The birds within remind viewers of Manansala's famous paintings of birds poised in flight: displaying identical body colours, flowing forms and rounded orbs for eyes, whose spherical shapes juxtapose with the gradient block structure of the overall composition. As the birds intersperse and overlap in the cages, their colours shift to produce varying faceted planes. Even within the skin tones of the bird seller, and in the hues of his hat, we observe Manansala's judicious employment of subtly different shades to create transparent textures and contours despite the austere lines of his method. Throughout the entire work, the cubist elements succeed in being simultaneously rigorous yet dynamic. Within this inspiring picture, as viewers we sense the weight of the cages, the toils of the seller, and the vibrant noise, lights and colours of Manansala's beloved marketplace.
Vicente Silva Manansala - Luksong-tinik (jumping Over Thorns)

Vicente Silva Manansala - Luksong-tinik (jumping Over Thorns)

Original 1973
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Gross Price
Lot number: 1767
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Description:
VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (The Philippines 1910-1981) Luksong-Tinik (Jumping over Thorns) signed and dated 'Manansala 73' (upper right) oil on canvas 31 x 28 in. (78 x 68 cm.) Painted in 1973 From the collection of Ambassador and Mrs J.V. Cruz. Anon. sale; Christie's, Singapore, 1 April 2001, lot 80. Acquired from the above sale by the present owner. Paras-Perez, Rodolfo, Manansala, Manila, 1980 (illustrated, p.214) "Picasso painted Les Demoiselles d'Avignon in 1907, three yearsbefore Manansala was born. It took another thirty-nine years beforeManansala had a meaningful encounter with the revolutionary style.Cubism then became the generating force of Manansala's matureworks, the stylistic center of his main oeuvres. It was not amaster-follower relationship - it was more like extending thepremises of a tradition. Cubism did not curtail the dimension ofManansala's vision. He enriched the style and gave it a newcontext. Above all, he gave it a new sense of place." - Rodolfo Paras-Perez, Manansala, Manila, 1980, p. 75 Vicente Manansala is a significant name within the modernistmovement in the Philippines. Growing up in the wake of theprevalent romantic realist genre, Manansala was twelve years oldwhen Fernando Amorsolo, then the acknowledged leading painter ofthe Spanish school, first developed his iconic pastoral landscapesbathed in effervescent tropical light - rice planting, women in thefields, couples dancing, village festivities. Struggling toarticulate an independent artistic identity for the 20th century,these were all deemed quintessentially Filipino by the artcommunity of the period, who were justifiably proud of thedevelopments in achieving a distinguishable, nationalisticpictorial vocabulary. However this was just the beginning. Soonenough Manansala and his peers were to rise to the fore in whateventually became the Philippines' impactful breakthrough towardsmodernism and the shattering of the rigidly structuredcompositional plane. As a young art student, Manansala too adopted the vocabulary ofgenre scenes, painting rice fields and beautiful peasant girls. Hesoon discovered though that bucolic village images were lessimportant to him than artistic texture and the interplay of coloursand structure. Like the Western cubist painters, he becamefascinated with how geometric shapes could cohere to develop arecognisable image, maintaining more expressionistic integrity thanrendered by a purely realistic technique. Manansala only retainedrealism in straightforward portraiture; his other works were soonto bear the hallmarks of Picasso, Braque, Gris, and Léger. In 1950,he was awarded a bursary by the French legation and spent a periodat Léger's atelier, learning from the master himself. Eventually,after developing the artistic confidence which his later works bearwitness to, he abandoned their influences for most part and devotedhimself to developing his own cubist methodologies which permittedthe flexibility and freedom to articulate a truly Filipino context.In his own words, Manansala affirmed: "When I say I am a cubist, Imean that I have taken Cubism's basic elements, reorganized themand added my own, creating my own style." (ibid, p. 51) This present work of 1973 depicts children engaging in the familiarFilipino game of 'luksong tinik' where the youthful participantsuse their hands to form a spine of thorns over which another childhas to leap. The dynamism and energy of this work rivals theromantic compositions of Manansala's Spanish-trained predecessors,however it displays none of their established devices in describing(and idealising) a recognisably Filipino scene. Lucid andexpressive, yet predominantly modernist in visual elocution,Manansala's use of a cubist background which isolates the figuresin movement, judicious allocation of empty pictorial space, andblocks of gradient colour heralded a new dawn for the evolution ofFilipino art.
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