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Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar

XIX Century - 
MAHMUD AL-QAJAR Mubarak Ibn Prince Sultan Husayn Murza Jalal Al Dawla

Sotheby's
Oct 12, 2004
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Along with Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Asadullah Al-Husayni, Muhammad Hasan, Mihr Ali, Mirza Baba Al-Husayni, Sayyid Muhammad Al Husayni Al Imami, Muhammad Shirin
Artworks in Arcadja
5

Some works of Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar

Extracted between 5 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - A Portrait Of A Qajar Minister

Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - A Portrait Of A Qajar Minister

Original -
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 3270
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
A portrait of a Qajar minister, signed Khanazad Abu Al-Hasan III (Thalith), Qajar Iran, dated AH 1294/1877-78 AD, watercolour on paper, the bearded man wears an elaborate embroidered robe, with pearl and emerald decorations, a portrait of Nasir al-Din Shah hung around his neck, with black nasta'liq script reading 'Khanazad Abu al-Hasan thalith AH 1294', mounted, framed and glazed, painting 27.3cm...
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A portrait of a Qajar minister, signed Khanazad Abu Al-Hasan III (Thalith), Qajar Iran, dated AH 1294/1877-78 AD, watercolour on paper, the bearded man wears an elaborate embroidered robe, with pearl and emerald decorations, a portrait of Nasir al-Din Shah hung around his neck, with black nasta'liq script reading 'Khanazad Abu al-Hasan thalith AH 1294', mounted, framed and glazed, painting 27.3cm x 17.7cm. Illustrated
Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Rare And Important Monumental Portrait Of Fath 'ali                         Shah Qajar

Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Rare And Important Monumental Portrait Of Fath 'ali Shah Qajar

Original 1798
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 50
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
oil on canvas, possibly transferred from original wall plaster

CATALOGUE NOTE
attribution to abu'l qasem This painting relates closely in terms of the sitter\\’s pose, his jewelled robes, accoutrements and crown, and the jewelled bolster, to twelve other monumental portraits of Fath 'Ali Shah all painted between 1798 and 1830 and now in various museum and private collections: 1. Fath 'Ali Shah seated against a bolster, circa 1805, sold through these rooms as part of the Berkeley Trust Collection, 12 October 2004, lot 21; now in a private collection. 2. Fath 'Ali Shah seated against a bolster, dated 1798-99; British Library, London, Oriental and India Office collection, inv.no.F.116 (formerly in the Commonwealth Relations office); Raby 1999, no.110, pp.38-39. 3. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated on a chair, circa 1800-1806; Musée du Louvre, Paris, MV638 (on loan from the Musée National de Versailles); Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.38, pp.181-2. 4. Fath \\`Ali Shah standing, dated 1809-10; State Hermitage Museum, St.Petersburg, VR-1107; Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.39, p.183. 5. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated against a bolster, dated 1813-14; State Hermitage Museum, St.Petersburg, VR-1108; Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.40, pp.184-5. 6. Fath \\`Ali Shah standing, dated 1813; Sadabad Museum of Fine Arts, Tehran (formerly in the Negaristan Museum); Falk 1972, no.15, Keikavusi, no.8,8a. 7. Fath \\`Ali Shah standing in armour, dated 1814-15; formerly Art and History Trust Collection, on loan at the Arthur M.Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C., LTS1995.2.122; Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.41.pp.185-6; Soudavar 1992, no.158, pp.388-9. 8. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated on a chair, dated 1815; private collection; Sotheby\\’s, London, 3rd May 2001, lot 69. 9. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated against a bolster, dated 1810; private collection; Sotheby\\’s, London, 26th April 1991, lot 186. 10. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated with a prince, circa 1815-30; private collection; Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.42, pp.187-8. 11. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated against a bolster, circa 1810; private collection; Robinson 1964, pl.XXXVI. 12. Fath \\`Ali Shah seated, circa 1798; private collection; Sotheby\\’s, New York, 30th May 1986, lot 118, Diba and Ekhtiar 1998, no.37, pp.180-1. However, a portrait of Fath 'Ali Shah by Abu\\’l Qasem, illustrated by Robinson in his article Court Painters of Fath Ali Shah (pl.XXXV) and in Falk\\’s pioneering book on Qajar painting, published in 1972 (fig.16, p.41), is perhaps the closest of all, sharing very similar treatment of the eyes, general pose, accoutrements and background, to the extent that the present portrait can be attributed to this artist. Both portraits share the same heavy-lidded, brooding eyes, elegantly outlined in kohl and framed by thick, joined eyebrows with attenuated ends. Tucked behind the sliver of ear that is visible, is a distinctive kiss curl that is not portrayed in the other paintings but is shared by these two of Abu'l Qasem. His arms bow stiffly outwards and a jewelled dagger hilt appears beneath the ends of his beard, a mace is gripped in one hennaed hand, and a sword rests against his left thigh in an almost identical arrangement. An examination of the drapery on the present example and the others also suggests the work of Abu'l Qasem. Fath 'Ali Shah's skirts are tucked firmly beneath his knees, the contours naturalistically shaded revealing the form of his body beneath; the folded knees of other seated portraits are not so heavily modelled, and even the fashion in which the pearl-embroidered hem fans out beneath is closely comparable. The pearl studded bolsters in the two portraits are identical with tasellated and jem studded ends, and a plain white body; other bolsters in the various portraits exhibit a patterned body, or a different pattern to the ends (see list above; Raby 1999, no 110, p.38-9, has a white body but differs in the six-petalled floral features at the ends). The flaming cartouches bearing the identifying inscription are almost indistinguishable, with heavy white rayhani in what appears to be the same hand. Together these features point to the work of Abu'l Qasem, an artist lauded by Falk in glowing terms: "this picture is evidence of the skill and care for details which singles out Abu'l-Qasim from all other Qajar artists." (Falk 1972, fig 16, p.41). historical context Fath 'Ali Shah was the second king of the Qajar dynasty. Born in 1771, he succeeded his uncle Agha Muhammad in 1797, and reigned until his death in 1834. This was a time of enormous change both at home and abroad. The European powers were competing for the riches of the east and the associated trade, and were keen to foster political and commercial ties in the Middle East and especially South and East Asia. Britain, France and almost all the other countries of Europe were engaged in the Napoleonic Wars, which lent a military and strategic significance to their potential alliances in the East. The competition among the foreign powers for indulgence at Fath 'Ali's court is illustrated by the case surrounding the visit of the envoy Sir Harford Jones in 1809-11. The Persians, having received no support from the British in repelling Russian attacks in the Caucasus, concluded the Treaty of Finkenstein with the French in 1807. The British reacted with alarm and simultaneously sent two envoys to Persia - Sir Harford Jones from London and General John Malcolm from India. These two, and subsequent envoys, managed to repair most of the damage caused by earlier neglect, and thereafter the competition between France and Britain in Iran was more evenly balanced. The attentions that the foreign powers paid to Fath 'Ali Shah were highly flattering to him, as well as being politically necessary, and they fanned the flames of his vanity. They were a welcome contrast to some of the domestic failures of his reign, which saw him lose a good deal of territory (and face) to the Russians in the Caucasus, and most of the eastern dominions in Central Asia. Large-scale portraits of Fath 'Ali Shah, such as the one in question, were accurate representations of the person and splendour of the king, of how he actually looked and what he actually wore. The following account is worth noting: "The court of Persia is one of the most magnificent and splendid in the world, and the greatest ceremony is used on the presentation of a person of rank to his Majesty Futteh Ali Shah, the Shadow of God upon Earth…. The king, covered with jewels of a costly description, wearing on his head the Taj or crown… sitting on a throne richly carved and studded with precious stones, and his back supported by an embroidered pillow. His beard, the admiration and delight of his people, descends to his girdle; on his arms he wears two large diamonds called the Mountain of Light and the Sea of Splendour, and when the sun\\’s rays fall upon him it is impossible to look on the Threshold of the World\\’s Glory with any steadiness." (From the caption to The Court of Persia, printed in 1834 by Robert Havell, London). However, these portraits were also produced for a definite political purpose. The intention must have been to actively demonstrate to the Persians, and especially to foreign ambassadors, monarchs and governments, the majesty, wealth, grandeur and power of the Iranian monarch, and thus of Persia. To this end, many of these portraits were sent abroad with emissaries who had visited the Persian court, to be presented to their respective rulers to convey the superiority of the Persian emperor. The majority were sent westwards to European nations and this reflected the international political situation in Iran at the time, with Britain, France and Russia all competing for influence at Fath \\`Ali Shah's court. The portrait now in the British Library was presented via Lord Wellesley to the Court of the Directors of the East India Company in 1806; another was sent to the Prince Regent (later King George IV) in 1812 along with an illustrated manuscript of the Diwan-i Khaqan (Fath \\`Ali Shah's own poetry), which is now in the Royal Library, Windsor Castle (see Raby 1999, p.40); the portrait now in the Musée Nationale de Versailles was sent to Napoleon via the French envoy Amédée Jaubert in 1806; the two portraits in the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, were formerly in the Gatchina Palace Museum and were almost certainly sent as politically loaded gifts to the Tsar. Bearing this in mind it is interesting to observe the common features in the portraits listed above. In seven, Fath \\`Ali Shah is seated on the ground on a jewelled rug against a jewelled bolster; in two, he is seated on a chair; in three, he is standing. In ten, he is dressed in state ceremonial regalia, and, in two, he is dressed in a martial costume of jewelled armour. In eight, his headdress is of the familiar pointed jewelled crown (as in the present example); in two, he wears a jewelled metal helmet, and, in two, he wears a cloth turban in Zandi style with jewelled features (these are the earliest of the group). Several objects depicted in the present example are common to other portraits. A jewelled sword (a symbol of state) appears in eight others; a jewelled mace (another symbol of state) appears in five others; a jewelled orb (also a symbol of state) appears in only two; a jewelled dagger, fastened behind his girdle, appears in all twelve others; a short jewelled bottle appears in five; a tall jewelled bottle appears in one. The pose and costume of Fath \\`Ali Shah in the present work closely resembles that in a manuscript of the Diwan-i Khaqan, painted by Mirza Baba in 1802 (Royal Library, Windsor (Holmes Ms.A/4 RCIN1005020), see Raby 1999, no.111, pp.40, 42). Many of these objects, and much of his dress and other accoutrements, were symbols of power and were obvious visual aspects of the iconography of royal authority. Their repeated use in this series of portraits was part of the political message that these images carried. The compositions and royal iconography brings to mind earlier traditions of royal portraiture: both oriental, including Sassanian rock-cut reliefs at Taq-i Bustan and other sites, medieval Persian miniature painting, early seventeenth century Mughal royal portraiture (see Beach 1981, cat. nos.17a,17b,17c, pp.74,78,79); and western, such as the large-scale oil portraits of the English monarchs Queen Elizabeth I (see Hearn, K., (ed.) Dynasties Painting in Tudor and Jacobean England 1530-1630, London, 1995-1996, nos.43, 45) and Charles I (ibid., no.142), all of whom were intensely occupied by ideas of empire and the politics of foreign affairs.
Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Persia

Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Persia

Original
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Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 220
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
A pair of Qajar laquered papier maché Panels
Persia, 20th Century
of rectangular form, painted in polychrome, the first an adaptation of the well-known scene of Shah 'Abbas II receiving a Mughal ambassador, the second a violent battle scene
32.5 x 44.5 cm.(2)
, € 1,200 - 1,700
Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Mirror Case

Mubarak Ibn Mahmud Al-Qajar - Mirror Case

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 221
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
A Qajar lacquer Mirror Case
Persia, 19th Century
rectangular, decorated in polychrome and gilt, the reverse with a pair of young lovers in an interior, the inside cover with a further young couple, the outside with a young lady holding a glass and decanter
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