Nicholaos Lytras

Greece (18831927 ) - Artworks
LYTRAS Nicholaos Portrait Of A Lady

Bonhams /Nov 28, 2011
7,002.80 - 9,337.07
Not Sold

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Nicholaos Lytras at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Nicholaos Lytras, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Alecos, Alex Kontopoulos, Constantinos Volanakis, Emilios Prosalentis, Pavlo Prosalentis, Périclès Pantazis, George Edwards Hering, Konstantinos Maleas
Artworks in Arcadja
32

Some works of Nicholaos Lytras

Extracted between 32 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Nicholaos Lytras - Aghios Sozon, Tinos

Nicholaos Lytras - Aghios Sozon, Tinos

Original 1923
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 6
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Nikolaos Lytras (Greek, 1883-1927) Aghios Sozon, Tinos signed in Greek (lower left) oil on canvas 56 x 45 cm. Footnotes Painted in 1923. A true find, this wonderful painting hitherto unpublished and unknown to art historical scholarship was given as a gift by Lytras to his friend, the mozaic artist Polychronis Renieris. In 1923, when he was appointed professor at the Athens School of Fine Arts, Nikolaos Lytras visited Tinos, the native island of his father, the great 19th c. painter Nikiforos Lytras, in search of an interpretative approach to nature and a deeper pictorial truth resulting from powerfully expressive juxtapositions. His fatherland, with its sparse, jugged terrain and sculptural quality of both its natural environment and traditional Cycladic architecture, offered Lytras many pictorial challenges posed by stark contrasts. It should be noted that in all of his Tinos paintings, which represent the culmination of his landscape work, Lytras consistently avoided general or panoramic views of the island's village complexes. Usually, only some scattered structures, identified by their solid, cube-like volumes, are juxtaposed with the wavy lines and flowing rhythms of the natural environment. 1 Like a white dove on a rocky outcrop ready to fly into the blue cloudless sky, Lytras's dazzling Cycladic chapel captures the power and brilliance of the Aegean archipelago. Vibrant form, painterly, Cezannesque technique and energetic brushwork in the vein of van Gogh support the liberation of properties intrinsic to the medium, asserting the freedom of the artist's pictorial gesture over his original subject. The tactility of the textured surfaces and, especially, the use of thick impasto lend a corporeal presence to the pictorial space. As perceptively noted by A. Kouria who curated the artist's major retrospective at the Athens National Gallery in 2008, "in Lytras's views of Tinos the very materiality of paint becomes the materiality of the landscape itself." 2 This sense of immediacy and substance is enhanced by the prominence of the foreground rocks, these 'immortal sculptures' 3 , as Y. Tsarouchis once called them, that eternally define the character of the Greek land, conveying to the viewers an impression of a first-hand experience, as if they were actually part of the landscape. The painting unfolds with upward undulating rhythms like an abstract interplay of successive volumes, welding the rugged terrain and the whitewashed chapel into such a compelling entity that even the artist's signature on the lower left seems organically integrated in the pictorial surface, as if it were an 'indigenous' part of the landscape. 1 . See A. Kouria, D. Portolos, Nikos Lytras, Building Form with Colour and Light [in Greek], National Gallery-A. Soutzos Museum & Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive, Athens 2008, pp. 115-119. 2 . Ibid, p. 118. 3 . Y. Tsarouchis, The Obsession with Greenery , Kathimerini daily, 7.9.1975.
Nicholaos Lytras - The Meadow (tinos)

Nicholaos Lytras - The Meadow (tinos)

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 6
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Nikolaos Lytras (Greek, 1883-1927) The Meadow (Tinos) signed in Greek (lower left) oil on canvas 52 x 71 cm. Footnotes PROVENANCE: Maria N. Lytra collection, Athens. Private collection, Athens. EXHIBITED: Athens, Galerie Stratigopoulou, 1925, no. 15. Athens, Zappeion Hall, Nikolaos Lytras retrospective exhibition , 1929, no. 94. Venice, Biennale, 1936, no. 99 (listed in the exhibition catalogue, p. 283). Athens, National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum, Nikos Lytras, Building with Colour and Light , March 19 - June 2, 2008, no. 111 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue, pp. 117,152) LITERATURE: Postcard issued by the Phoenix Insurance company, c. 1960s (illustrated). Y. Papaioannou, Yannis Spyropoulos, Monograph , Yannis and Zoe Spyropoulos Foundation, Athens 2010, no. 75, p. 152 (illustrated). One of the best known and most accomplished works by a pioneer expressionist landscape painter and one of the twenty oils that represented his oeuvre at the 1936 Venice Biennale, Nikolaos Lytras's The meadow (Tinos) captures the power and brilliance of the Cycladic landscape, while demonstrating the artist's interpretative approach to nature. Painterly, Cezannesque technique, intense brushwork in the vein of van Gogh and thick impasto that lends a corporeal presence to the pictorial space support the liberation of properties intrinsic to the artist's medium, asserting the freedom of his pictorial gesture over his original subject. Expressionism had a definitive impact on him during his studies in Munich, at a time when fierce brushwork and bold colour began to acquire greater importance than the fleeting effects of impressionism. As noted by A. Kouria who curated the artist's major retrospective at the Athens National Gallery in 2008, the Bonhams picture is "one of Lytras's best landscapes of Tinos. The island terrain and the chapel in the distance are viewed from a low vantage point with pictorial space developing upwards, like a hanging tapestry, to a very high horizon. The dark, cool-toned areas in the foreground lead the eye to the middleground which is dominated by warm and luminous ochres. The structural handling of the subject conveys to the viewers the impression that they are actually part of the landscape, which unfolds with upward undulating rhythms like an abstract interplay of lines and successive surfaces. This is emphasised by the horizontal markings made on the thick impasto by the pointed rear end of the artist's paintbrush. As in other works by Lytras, the various details are organically integrated in the painting, as is the case with the reclining cow in the fore-middleground which seems to have sprouted from the landscape itself and become an integral part of it." 1 The powerful, pronounced diagonals of the island stone walls, the large, angular shapes and the overall development of meandering lines build up a solid compositional edifice, an architectural organisation of active space and vibrant form without breaking from the world of appearances. The artist achieves this sense of substance by the density and texture of the paint itself, while developing a rhythmically articulate series of formal elements that weld the image and its attendant attributes into a compelling entity. Even the artist's signature on the lower right is treated in a purely formal manner, becoming organically integrated in the pictorial surface, as if it were an 'indigenous' part of the landscape. Animate and inanimate subjects are handled not just as coloured patterns of light and shade in a sequence of receding planes but, rather, as a powerful means of communicating the artist's acute perception and intense experience of their deeper pictorial truth. As noted by Professor C. Christou, "Lytras's landscapes offer a monumental image of the natural environment and express all its inner forces." 2 Much more than displaying an intricate fabric of energetic brushstrokes and textured surfaces that betray the sure hand of a master expressionist, this amazing work aims directly at the essence of things, seeking to capture the inner rhythm, eternal structure and timeless canon of the Greek landscape; seeking, in other words, not only to identify its character but also to interpret its soul. 1 . A. Kouria, D. Portolos, Nikos Lytras, Building Form with Colour and Light [in Greek], National Gallery-A. Soutzos Museum & Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive, Athens 2008, p. 118. 2 . C. Christou, The Mountainous Landscape in Greek Painting [in Greek], To Ergastiri Art Editions, Athens 1991, p. 26.
Nicholaos Lytras - Portrait Of A Woman

Nicholaos Lytras - Portrait Of A Woman

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 46
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot 46 Nikolaos Lytras Greek, 1883-1927 Portrait of a Woman Signed (ll) Oil on canvas laid to board Oval 23 5/8 x 19 11/16 inches (60 x 50 cm) Provenance: Commissioned from the artist by the mother of the present owner, thence by decent to the present owner C Estimate $6,000-9,000 Frame is broken. Dirty varnish. Frame rubbing. Tiny ding in the sitter's hair; tiny scuff at center right. No apparent restoration. Any condition statement is given as a courtesy to a client, is only an opinion and should not be treated as a statement of fact. Doyle New York shall have no responsibility for any error or omission. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging.
Nicholaos Lytras - Portrait Of A Lady

Nicholaos Lytras - Portrait Of A Lady

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 6
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Nikolaos Lytras (Greek, 1883-1927) Portrait of a lady signed in Greek (upper left) oil on canvas 70.5 x 55 cm. EXHIBITED: Athens, National Gallery and Alexander Soutzos Museum, Nikos Lytras Retrospective , 19 March - 2 June 2008. LITERATURE: A. Kouria - D. Portolos, Nikos Lytras , National Gallery & ELIA Edition, Athens 2008, p. 65, no 23 (illustrated).
Nicholaos Lytras - Landscape

Nicholaos Lytras - Landscape

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 28
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Nikolaos Lytras (Greek, 1883-1927) Landscape signed in Greek (lower right) oil on canvas 54 x 42.5 cm. PROVENANCE: Private collection, Athens. A work full of vitality and inner strength that can deservedlystand next to the great masterpieces of early European modernism,this captivating picture encapsulates all the signature traits ofLytras' landscape painting. Painterly, Cezannesque technique,intense brushwork in the vein of van Gogh and thick impasto thatlends a corporeal presence to the pictorial space support theliberation of properties intrinsic to the artist's medium,asserting the freedom of his pictorial gesture. The fluid rhythm ofthe execution becomes the means by which the artist not onlyrecords but shares in this field of energy in search of a deeperpictorial truth. The simplified surfaces with their syncopatedrhythm, the corporeality of the picture plane and the gestural,textured brushwork that convey to the viewer a sense of immediacyand an impression of a first-hand experience, act jointly toachieve the final expressive outcome, capturing the eternalstructure and timeless canon of the Greek landscape. The powerful, pronounced diagonal of the hillslopes, the large,triangular shapes and the overall development of oblique,undulating lines, build up a solid compositional edifice, whichcreates a new reality through an architectural organisation ofactive space and vibrant form without breaking from the world ofappearances. The artist achieves the sense of substance with whichhe endows his forms by the density and texture of the paint itself,while developing a rhythmically articulate series of formalelements that weld the image and its attendant attributes into acompelling entity. Even the artist's signature on the lower rightis treated in a purely formal manner, becoming organicallyintegrated in the pictorial surface, as if it were an 'indigenous'part of the landscape. (Compare Hymettus and Attic Landscape in the Katsigras Museum collection.) As noted byProfessor C. Christou, "Lytras' landscapes offer a monumental imageof the natural environment and express all its inner forces.Without completely sacrificing the external characteristics of thelandscape, the artist manages to represent it as a comprehensivewhole with perfectly balanced constituent elements: broad surfaces,energetic brushwork, expressive use of colour and structuredorganization." Landscape was probably painted towards the end of the 1910s,while the rolling background hills suggest a view of an Atticlandscape -a rich source of inspiration for the artist offering himmany pictorial challenges. (Compare From Galatsi sold byBonhams, Greek Sale, 19.5.9009, lot 32.) As noted by A. Kouria andD. Portolos, who prepared the monograph on the artist, "the Atticlandscape persistently claimed Lytras' attention since it wassparse, barren, with pellucid, pure forms and planes in atranslucent atmosphere and with an innate rhythm. Lytras' paintingslend the Greek landscape a new formal identity and meaning, withthe natural environment stripped of the descriptiveness andnarrative of traditional naturalistic renderings, oftencharacterised by a tendency for idealisation, genre overtones andpenchant for the blatantly picturesque. His landscapes are rugged,frugal, without beautifying tricks or decorative framings, oftenrelying instead on a limited and very restrained palette. Moreover,identifying many of these landscapes is problematic, if notimpossible, due to the artist's fragmentary visual approach andabstractive process, as well as the lack of anecdotal elements orlandmarks that shape the superficial features and determine theidentity of a specific area." In his search for an interpretative approach to nature, Lytras, whoco-founded the legendary anti-academic 'Omas Techni' art group,infused the forces of renewal in Greek painting with a fresh andvital impetus and had a major impact on the artists of the 1930sgeneration who set out not only to identify the unique character ofGreekness but also to interpret its very soul. As noted by AthensNational Gallery director M. Lambraki-Plaka, "Nikolaos Lytras was apainter committed to the truth of vision and a true revolutionarywho reinvigorated Greek painting." See A. Kouria in The G. I. KatsigrasCollection [in Greek], Municipal Gallery of Larissa -G.I.Katsigras Museum, Larissa 2005, p. 132. C. Christou, The Mountainous Landscape in GreekPainting [in Greek], To Ergastiri Art Editions, Athens 1991, p.26. A. Kouria, D. Portolos, Nikos Lytras, BuildingForm with Color and Light [in Greek], exhibition catalogue,National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum, Athens 2008, pp. 107-109,113. M. Lambraki-Plaka, introduction to Nikos Lytras,Building Form with Colour and Light , p. 14.
Arcadja LogoProducts
Subscriptions
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscriptions

Who we are
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr