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Roy Lichtenstein

United States (New York 1923 -  1997 ) Wikipedia® : Roy Lichtenstein
LICHTENSTEIN Roy Shipboard Girl

Palais Dorotheum
May 17, 2018
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Roy Lichtenstein at auctions worldwide.
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Artworks in Arcadja
6791

Some works of Roy Lichtenstein

Extracted between 6,791 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Roy Lichtenstein - Mirror #5

Roy Lichtenstein - Mirror #5

Original 1972
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Lot number: 107
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) Mirror #5; from the Mirror Series (C. 110), 1972 Lithograph and screenprint in colors on Special Arjomari paper, signed in pencil, dated and numbered 18/80 (there were also 10 artist's proofs), with the blindstamp and inkstamp of the publisher/printer Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles, with full margins, framed. 34 1/4 x 24 1/4 (87 x 61.6cm) sheet 43 1/2 x 33 1/4in (111.3 x 84.6cm)
Roy Lichtenstein -  Crak! Color

Roy Lichtenstein - Crak! Color

Original 1963
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Lot number: 190
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
ROY LICHTENSTEIN Crak! Color offset lithograph on lightweight, white wove paper, 1963-64. 473x687 mm; 18 5/8x27 inches (sheet), wide margins. Edition of 300. Signed and dated in pencil, lower right. Printed by Colorcraft, New York. Published by Leo Castelli Gallery, New York. A very good impression. Corlett II 2.
Roy Lichtenstein - Screen With Brushstrokes

Roy Lichtenstein - Screen With Brushstrokes

Original 1986
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Lot number: 742
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) Screen with Brushstrokes incised with the artist's signature and numbered 'AP 2/3' (on a plaque accompanying the work) acrylic and metal leaf on lacquered wood relief, in 5 joined parts each: 94 ½ x 27 x 2 ½ in. (240 x 69 x 6.3 cm.) overall: 94 ½ x 135 x 2 ½ in. (240 x 342.9 x 6.3 cm.) Executed in 1986. This work is the second artist's proof from an initially proposed edition of twelve, plus three artist's proofs. The artist closed the edition at six works, plus two artist's proofs. Provenance Lana Jokel, New York, acquired directly from the artist Acquired from the above by the present owner
Roy Lichtenstein - Shipboard Girl

Roy Lichtenstein - Shipboard Girl

Original 1965
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Gross Price
Lot number: 322
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Roy Lichtenstein (New York 1923–1997) Shipboard Girl, 1965, signed rf Lichtenstein, colour offset lithograph on thin wove paper, image size 66x48.5cm, sheet size 69x51.5cm, pub. Leo Castelli Gallery, New York, framed Literature: Mary Lee Corlett, Ruth E. Fine, Roy Lichtenstein, The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein: A Catalogue Raisonné 1948–1997, New York 2002, no. II.6
Roy Lichtenstein - Portrait

Roy Lichtenstein - Portrait

Original 1986
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Gross Price
Lot number: 164
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Description:
Roy Lichtenstein PORTRAIT 1923 - 1997 signed and dated '86on the reverse oil and Magna on canvas 56 by 36 in. 142.2 by 91.4 cm. Malmberg International Art, Malmö Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles Private Collection Christie's, New York, 9 November 1993, Lot 51 Acquired from the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Tony Shafrazi Gallery,American Masters of the Sixties,May - June 1990 Catalogue Note "Well, everything is a brushstroke. It\’s either real or it\’s fake. That\’s the idea. It gives me a certain freedom – if I make a mistake, I can correct it with a fake brushstroke. I like to work this way. It makes a nice textural difference. I think, between the two things. Maybe its my own art criticism." Roy Lichtenstein Exploding on the canvas in a spectacle of bold primary colors, Roy Lichtenstein\’s seminal 1986Portrait is a milestone in the painter\’s eternally evolving exploration of art-making, encapsulating his ultimate project of painting pictures about pictures. The canvas erupts into a panorama of Lichtenstein\’s iconic bold lines, Ben-day dots, and deceptively expressionist brush strokes. These elements coalesce into a brilliant chaos that upon closer examination reveals itself as meticulously controlled spontaneity.Portrait, executed at the apex of Lichtenstein\’s trailblazing career, reflects Pop art at its most sophisticated and self-aware. A symphony of painterly swooshes rip across the canvas framing the slender Ben-day dotted face of the unknown muse. Portrait is both intriguing and mysterious, her coy smirk and eye obscured by a painterly swoosh of flowing hair demand our attention, seduces our gaze and calls into question the revered status of painterly gesture. Throughout Lichtenstein\’s career, the brushstroke became as much a subject as his unnamed female muses, who stand as central protagonists to his diverse oeuvre. Although the initial Brushstroke paintings were restricted to 1965–1966, he worked with the motif – making other drawings and prints – until 1971 and would later return to it in more elaborate forms, including sculpture, well into the 1990s. Initially, Lichtenstein\’s Brushstroke series was thought to be a sly comment on the artistic dominance of the Abstract Expressionist, whose passionate and emotive marks were often regarded as the ultimate demonstration of artistic prowess. With Portrait and earlier works, Lichtenstein began to challenge this hegemony, and by interpreting these spontaneous marks in a commercial, mass-produced style, he questioned the authority of these purportedly inimitable gestures. Lichtenstein explained, \“it\’s taking something that originally was supposed to mean immediacy and I\’m tediously drawing something that looks like a brushstroke… I want it to look as though it were painstaking. It\’s a picture of a picture and it\’s a misconstrued picture of a picture\” (the artist quoted in Exh. Cat., Roy Lichtenstein, Art Institute of Chicago, 2012, p. 50). Lichtenstein calls into question the revered status of the painterly mark by taking the essence of painting – the sanctity of the brushstroke – and opens the tradition of art-making to a whole new range of possibilities by framing it within the Pop idiom. Portrait offers the viewer an intimate engagement with both art historical precedent and Lichtenstein\’s own artistic past. Considering the relationship between art history and artist, Lichtenstein commented, \“[a]ll painters take a personal attitude toward painting. What makes each object in the work is that it is organized by that artist\’s vision. The style and the content are also different from anyone else\’s. They are unified by the point of view – mine. This is the big tradition of art\” (the artist in Calvin Tomkins, Roy Lichtenstein: Mural with Blue Brushstroke, New York 1988, p. 42). Throughout his career, the giants of Modernism remained touchstones for Lichtenstein. Their investigation of the aesthetic quandaries of Modern art—namely the relationship between subject and artist, the temporal nature of reality, and the formal functions of line, light, and color— were mirrored within his own oeuvre. The present work is a paragon of conceptual sophistication, fusing the diverse vernaculars of Minimalism, Abstract Expressionism, Surrealism, and Pop in a captivating dialogue between masterpieces both past and present. Testifying to the highly allusive nature of Portrait, and his body of work as a whole, Lichtenstein commented, \“All my art is, in some way, about other art\” (the artist in Janis Hendrickson, Roy Lichtenstein, Cologne 2000, n.p.).

LA BIOGRAFIA DI Roy Lichtenstein

LICHTENSTEIN Roy nato a New York nel 1923 da una famiglia medio borghese, cominciò a disegnare e a dipingere per hobby, ritraendo spesso i musicisti jazz che amava ascoltare nei teatri di Harlem.
In seguito, nei primi anni Quaranta, si iscrisse alla School of Fine Arts della Ohio State University, dove potè seguire i corsi di arte del professor Sherman.
Nel 1945 dopo la guerra, alla quale aveva partecipato attivamente in Europa, si trasferì a Parigi.
In questo periodo dipingerà opere prevalentemente geometriche, ispirate al cubismo che aveva sempre ammirato.
Fino al 1951 insegnò alla scuola d'arte della Ohio State University dove aveva compiuto gli studi.
La sua prima personale sarà proprio nell'Ohio, a Cleveland, alla Ten-Thirty Gallery, mentre la prima mostra newyorkese sarà organizzata alla Carlebach Gallery.
I suoi dipinti oscilleranno tra il cubismo e l'espressionismo avviandosi verso uno stile sempre più libero e impulsivo.
Creò "assemblage" di oggetti in legno e opere sperimentali espressioniste, scegliendo prevalentemente soggetti americani, come cavalli, cavalieri e indiani.
Nel 1956, Lichtenstein realizzò una litografia umoristica che riproduceva una banconota da dieci dollari della stessa forma rettangolare, come fosse una contraffazione.
Si tratta di un'opera ancora proto-pop, visto che fino al 1961 egli si dedicherà, per lo più, all'espressionismo astratto.
Nel 1960 insegnò come assistente al Douglass College, presso la Rutgers University nel New Jersey, dove incontrò Allan Kaprow, anch'egli insegnante, con cui sperimentò la tecnica artistica dell'happening e dell'environment.
Conobbe anche altri artisti, come Jim Dine, che condivideranno i suoi interessi concettuali per le tematiche pop.
Fu solo nel 1961 che l'opera di Lichtenstein raggiunse una completa e originale definizione all'interno della Pop Art, utilizzando le immagini della pubblicità dei beni di consumo e scegliendo, in particolare, il mondo del fumetto e della tecnica della stampa industriale.
Le immagini dei più banali fumetti vengono ingigantite e modificate attraverso l'intervento a olio direttamente sulla tela, attraverso una tecnica spersonalizzante e negatrice dell'individualità espressiva.
Nell'autunno del 1961 alcune sue opere vennero presentate alla Leo Castelli Gallery, dove Lichtenstein farà una mostra personale l'anno successivo e dove incontrerà anche Andy Warhol.
Durante gli anni Sessanta furono numerose e importanti le esposizioni personali e collettive a cui parteciperà l'artista, che nel frattempo si era dedicato a tempo pieno alla pittura: New York, a Pasadena, a Parigi, Los Angeles, Torino, e poi Minneapolis, Amsterdam, Londra, Berna e Hannover.
Realizzò, inoltre, sculture di ceramica, paesaggi, dipinti di architetture monumentali, e dipinti con immagini degli anni Trenta, una produzione vasta e variegata che sarà esposta in importanti musei americani, come il Los Angeles County Museum, il Salomon R.
Guggenheim e il Metropolitan Museum a New York.
Nel 1970 dipinse quattro grandi murali di "pennellate" per la facoltà di medicina di Dusseldorf, e venne nominato membro della American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Fino al 1980 realizzò quadri con illusioni ottiche (Specchi, Trompe-l'oeil) e altre opere-omaggio surrealiste, futuriste, espressioniste.
Altre mostre itineranti e retrospettive continuarono negli anni Ottanta e Novanta, negli Stati Uniti, in Europa, e in Giappone.
Morì il 29 settembre del 1997 a New York.

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