John Lavery

Ireland (18561941 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - John Lavery
LAVERY John Tennis, Hotel Beau Site, Cannes

Christie's /Nov 20, 2013
355,155.60 - 591,926.00
1,063,078.90

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of John Lavery at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert

 

Variants on Artist's name :

Sir John Lavery, R.A., R.S.A., R.H.A.

 

Along with John Lavery, our clients also searched for the following authors:
James Abbot Mcneill Whistler, Bill Brandt, Laura Knight, Louis Le Brocquy, William Nicholson, Robert Adams, Roger Hilton
Artworks in Arcadja
346

Some works of John Lavery

Extracted between 346 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John Lavery - The Palladian Bridge, Wilton

John Lavery - The Palladian Bridge, Wilton

Original 1920
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 9
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot 9 Sir John Lavery RA RSA RHA, 1856-1941 THE PALLADIAN BRIDGE, WILTON, Oil on canvas board, 10” x 14” (25.5 x 35.5cm), signed; signed, inscribed and dated August, 1920 verso Provenance: A birthday gift from the artist to Patricia Viscountess Hambledon, and thence by descent to the previous owner; Sotheby’’s, London Irish Art Auction May 7th 2008 (Lot 152); Private Collection, Dublin. In the summer of 1920, Lavery went to Wilton near Salisbury, the home of the Herbert family to paint teh famous Double Cube Room designed by Inigo Jones. The resulting “portrait interior”, known as The Van Dyck Room, Wilton, was to become his Royal Academy Diploma painting, His brief stay also provided the opportunity to paint small views of the celebrated Palladian bridge spanning the river Nadder, and constructed close to the house by the ninth Earl of Pembroke in 1737. Apart from the present canvasboard, two others of the same size, without figures, are known. The Palladian Bridge, Wlilton House, shows a stretch of the river, with the bridge at some distance. It can be compared with the more conventional composition executed on the opposite bank, with much less ease by Winston Churchill, who had recently taken up painting under Lavery’’ s tutelage. According to the Herbert family, master and pupil worked in friendly competition on the motif. However the present picture is the most interesting of the Palladian Bridge sequence to come to light. It includes members of the Herbert family enjoying the bright summer’’s day in their private park. They have been identified as Patricia Herbert, daughter of the 15th Earl, later Viscountess Hambledon, dressed in salmon pink leaning against the balustrade, and Beatrix, Countess of Pembroke seated on the bench. The boy who sits beside the countess is thought to be either of Patricia’’s younger brothers, Anthony Edward George Herbert or most likely David Alexander Reginald Herbert. The family lurcher at the countess’’s feet completes the group. As Lloyd George held forth at the Peace Conference and British trade struggled to revive after years of war, Lavery, with splendid economy reveals the relaxed ambiance of the English country hhouse on a summer day. Its quiet grandeur anticipates the glorious garden parties he portrayed with greater frequency on long weekends during the twenties. But the mood here is modest rather than festive- in accord with a restrained palette that comes brilliantly to life in the touches of pink given by the women’’s dresses. Estimate: €50,000 - €70,000 AUCTION DETAILS: IRISH ART AUCTION Tuesday 25th March 2014 Thomas Prior Hall, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 » View Lots » Browse Flip Catalogue » Live Bidding
John Lavery -  Evening On The House Top, Tangier

John Lavery - Evening On The House Top, Tangier

Original 1920
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 84
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Sir John Lavery, R.S.A., R.H.A., R.A. (1856-1941) Evening on the House Top, Tangier signed 'J. Lavery' (lower left), signed again, inscribed and dated 'EVENING ON THE/HOUSE TOP. TANGIER/1920/BY JOHN LAVERY.' (on the reverse) oil on canvas 25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm.) Given by the artist to Donald Jenkins, a friend of the artist, and by descent. Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 20 May 1999, lot 58, where purchased by the present owner.
John Lavery - The Market Place, Tetouan

John Lavery - The Market Place, Tetouan

Original 1907
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 181
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Sir John Lavery, R.A., R.S.A., R.H.A. (1856-1941) The Market Place, Tetouan signed 'J. Lavery' (lower left) oil on panel 5 x 8½ in. (12.7 x 21.6 cm.) Painted in 1907. R.B. Cunninghame Graham, 'The Atmosphere of Morocco', in C. Holme (ed.), Sketching Grounds, The Studio, 1909, p. 151, illustrated, as 'The Market Place, Tetuan' [sic]. possibly London, Leicester Galleries, Cabinet Pictures by John Lavery, 1904, no. 35. Uncertainty remains around Lavery's visits to Tangier between 1893 and 1903 when he purchased the house on the outskirts of the city that became his winter retreat. Questions also persist regarding his adventures beyond its confines. One memorable expedition was made to Fez via Tetouan and Arzila with Walter Harris and R.B. Cunninghame Graham in the spring of 1906 which he described with great relish, but it is possible that he visited Morocco's northern capital on more than one occasion (K. McConkey, John Lavery, A Painter and his World, 2010, pp. 96-7). He is also likely to have ridden the 37 miles from Tangier to Tetouan more than once and although the sequence of small panels used to illustrate Selwyn Brinton's account of 'An English Artist in Morocco' (The Connoisseur, vol. xix, 1907, pp. 34-41), are claimed for the 1906 expedition, some may have been painted earlier. The stylistic attributes of the present work would tend to confirm this. Certainly Lavery's splendid sketch of the moon is rising over this ancient city conveys something of its serenity. Nestling in a fertile valley to the east of Tangier, and accessible overland through a mountain pass that was notoriously dangerous for western travelers, Tetouan had traditionally looked to the Levant rather than to its closer European neighbours. And at this moment, a crowd at the exit from the market place on the right of the present composition may be answering the call to evening prayer. Lavery would also paint a nocturne of the city and a second view of the market place showing a range of low buildings with a mountain backdrop. However, of the group, the present panel most clearly demonstrates his ability as a spontaneous composer - instinctively placing the roof lines and towers by golden section, and balancing shrill notes of red and green in the colour harmony. We are very grateful to Professor Kenneth McConkey for preparing the catalogue entries for lots 181 and 184.
John Lavery - Tennis, Hotel Beau Site, Cannes

John Lavery - Tennis, Hotel Beau Site, Cannes

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 41
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Sir John Lavery, R.A., R.S.A., R.H.A. (1856-1941) Tennis, Hotel Beau Site, Cannes signed 'J. Lavery' (lower left), signed again, inscribed and dated 'TENNIS HOTEL/BEAU-SITE./CANNES/BY JOHN LAVERY/5 CROMWELL PLACE/LONDON./1929.' (on the reverse) oil on canvas 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm.) Alice McEnery, the artist's step-daughter, by whom given to the present owner's mother in 1974, and by descent. THE PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN FAMILY Exhibition catalogue, Royal Academy Illustrated, London, Royal Academy, 1929, p. 18, illustrated. K. McConkey, Sir John Lavery, Edinburgh, 1993, p. 186. K. McConkey, John Lavery, A Painter and his World, Edinburgh, 2010, p. 185. K. McConkey, 'Tennis Parties' in A. Sumner (ed.), exhibition catalogue, Court on Canvas: Tennis in Art, Birmingham, Barber Institute of Fine Arts, 2011, p. 75, fig. 3.28, illustrated. London, Royal Academy, 1929, no. 194, as 'Les Orangers du Beau-Site de Cannes'. Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute, Great Britain, no. 256, as 'Tennis at Cannes'. Glasgow, Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts, 1930, no. 208, as 'Tennis at Cannes'. Having been introduced to the Riviera by Winston Churchill in 1921, Lavery sold his house in Tangier in 1923 and although he and Lady Lavery experimented with a winter holiday at Montreux the following year and exhibition-related visits to the United States intervened thereafter, they set off for the Hotel Beau Site at Cannes at new year in 1929. These three month sojourns were a busman's holiday for the painter as, surrounded by the wealthy pleasure-seekers of Scott Fitzgerald, he was constantly on the look-out for new subjects. He had probably decided in advance that one project would be to paint the celebrated Salles Privés, (Private Collection) at Monte Carlo. This was accomplished with the help of a series of on-the-spot oil sketches of the principal players.1 At the same time Lavery must have realised that his hotel at Cannes was renowned for its tennis courts which, as can be seen from an early postcard, were screened by orange trees. Although the Riviera tennis clubs were formed around the turn of the century, tournaments at Cannes took off in the mid-twenties when the prospect of an encounter between Suzanne Lenglen and Helen Wills provoked the The Sunday Times to comment that the game was 'a godsend to hotel-keepers, who would otherwise probably have to deplore losses resulting from a particularly rainy season'2. For Lavery the game had a special resonance. The picture which achieved his first notable success at the Paris Salon was of course The Tennis Party, 1885. This had in 1926, been de-accessioned by the Munich Pinakothek, and was immediately snapped up by Sir James Murray for Aberdeen Art Gallery. In works like Played!!, (sold in these Rooms, 26 May 2011, lot 94) also painted during that momentous mid-eighties summer, Lavery proved himself the leading 'painter of modern life' in the emergent Glasgow School. Various tennis pictures followed this as artists such as James Guthrie, Arthur Melville and Henry La Thangue realised the potential of the new craze as subject matter. The game remained popular around that turn of the century, and while there are no accounts of Lavery playing it, we know from one of her portraits that his daughter, Eileen, was keen on the game (Lawn Tennis Museum, Wimbledon). Then, in 1919 on a visit to Trent Park, the home of Sir Philip Sassoon, the artist was once more confronted with the spectacle (William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow). In the intervening years what had essentially begun as a pastime for sons and daughters of the suburban middle classes had spread throughout the Empire. Country houses of the gentry constructed courts at the same time as municipal parks in provincial cities. The spread of literacy, cheap newspapers and sports reporting brought championship tournaments to the masses and the return of The Tennis Party to a British public collection compounded Lavery's enthusiasm for the game. On his sojourn at Palm Beach, he painted Florida in Winter, a vivid sketch of Hazel Lavery reading on a parapet overlooking the courts at the Breakers Hotel.3 However, one other compelling reason for a second major tennis picture, was provided by Lavery's step-daughter, Alice Trudeau. A tall, willowy sporting type, Alice had mastered golf, was a keen horsewoman and also a skilful tennis player. She accompanied the painter and her mother to Cannes in January 1929 and her enthusiasm, which her mother did not share, led the painter, in the final weeks of his stay, to the courts at the Hotel Beau Site. There, Alice received coaching from the Irish Davis Cup player, George Lyttleton Rogers, and it is possible that he is the principal server in the game which Lavery observes. There had been snow on the Riviera at the time of Lavery's arrival and during that spring it had been unusually cold. Spectators, as is clear from the present work, are well-wrapped, even though the sun is shining. These foreground figures draw the composition together and add a new spatial layer that, with the orange tree, help to frame the game. Originally the woman on the left, wearing a cloche hat, sat under an umbrella to shield her from the sun, but this, possibly because of its inconsistency, was painted out.4 Alice went on to compete in the Cannes Handicap finals the following year - an event celebrated in a second, smaller version of Les Orangers du Beau Site de Cannes5. In this she replaces the male server and the foreground figures are omitted. Although Lavery presented this version to his secretary, Charles Robert Chisman, in gratitude for his service in 1930, it is possible that it was painted a year earlier and formed the basis of the now re-discovered larger work. It is undoubtedly the case that the present, larger version with its foreground spectators was favoured by the Laverys since they made it their new year greetings card for 1930. It was also true that taken alongside the Salles Privés and Lavery's large commemorative canvas depicting the opening of the Duveen Galleries at the Tate Gallery (Tate), this was a particularly strong Academy showing for the '... master of swift notation, infallibly accurate in the registration of colour values ...' who, according to P.G. Konody, writing in The Observer, was also the provider of ' sparkling, animated glimpses of modern life'.6 The old ideals that motivated the original Tennis Party were undimmed. We are very grateful to Professor Kenneth McConkey for preparing this catalogue entry. 1 McConkey, 2010, p. 179. 2 McConkey, 2011, p. 81 (note 59). 3 Lavery was concurrently holding an exhibition at Whitehall, Palm Beach during the winter months of 1926-7. 4 It is possible that this figure was posed by Hazel Lavery. 5 The visit to Cannes in 1930 coincided with Alice's wedding in March to a wealthy Irish tennis-playing farmer called Jack McEnery, much to the chagrin of her mother. 6 P.G. Konody, 'The Royal Academy, This Year's Exhibition', The Observer, 5 May 1929, p. 5.
John Lavery - Moonrise; Tangier

John Lavery - Moonrise; Tangier

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 214
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Sir John Lavery R.A., R.S.A., R.H.A. (1856-1941) Moonrise; Tangier signed 'J. Lavery' (lower right); further signed, inscribed and dated 'Moonrise; Tangier/John Lavery/1920' (verso) and signed, inscribed and dated again 'MOONRISE/TANGIER EVENING/LAVERY/1925' (on the backboard) oil on canvasboard 25.1 x 35.3 cm. (9 7/8 x 13 7/8 in.) Footnotes PROVENANCE: Sale; Sotheby's, London, 18 May 2000, lot 108, where acquired by the present owner In January 1920 the Laverys returned to Tangier for what was to be their final Moroccan tour – one that would include a sea journey down the African coast to Rabat and from there, an overland journey to Marrakesh. However, much of the time was spent at Dar-el-Midfah, the painter's house on Mount Washington, to the south-west of Tangier, a 'beautiful suburb' according to Selwyn Brinton, '... where are some of the best European residences'. Here the painter revisited familiar motifs. At the 'cool, delicious hour of sunset' he would follow the local custom, repair to the flat rooftop of his house and there he would paint the moon rising above the villas on the distant ridges (Selwyn Brinton MA, 'An English Artist in Morocco', The Connoisseur , vol xix, 1907, p.37-8). A number of these small skyscapes, from various winter sojourns have survived, as indeed have larger canvases showing his Arab servants listening to music or gazing out to sea from the house-top – one such, Evening on the Housetop, Tangier , (Private Collection) was painted on the current trip. The present work, with its sensuous rivulets of paint, must surely indicate that Lavery's lyrical feeling for the handling of materials had not deserted him. Its spontaneity provides further evidence of the exuberance that such moments on the motif produced. We are grateful to Professor Kenneth McConkey for compiling this catalogue entry.
Arcadja LogoProducts
Subscriptions
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscriptions

Who we are
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr