John Lavery

Ireland (18561941 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - John Lavery
LAVERY John Admiralty Arch, 19th July 1919

Sotheby's /Dec 10, 2014
379,506.56 - 632,510.94
Not Sold

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Variants on Artist's name :

Sir John Lavery, R.A., R.S.A., R.H.A.

 

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Artworks in Arcadja
382

Some works of John Lavery

Extracted between 382 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John Lavery - A Portrait Of Mrs W F Burton

John Lavery - A Portrait Of Mrs W F Burton

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Lot number: 161
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SIR JOHN LAVERY (1856-1941), c, signed lower right, oil on canvas, 30" x 25" Provenance: The sitter - Mrs W.F. Burton nee Georgina Spencer Wellesley (d.1943), great Niece of the Duke of Wellington, daughter of Hon. Captain William Henry George Wellesley (1806-1875) and Amelia St. John Niblock. Thence by descent.
John Lavery - The Red Hammock

John Lavery - The Red Hammock

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Lot number: 199
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Title: Lot 199 - 'The Red Hammock (Print)' Artist: John Lavery Size: H 11" x W 13" H 28cm x W 33cm Frame: This piece is framed Medium: Print Enquire about this item View other items by John Lavery Print details
John Lavery - After The Dance

John Lavery - After The Dance

Original 1883
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Lot number: 38
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Sir John Lavery, R.S.A., R.S.A., R.A. (1856-1941) After the Dance signed and dated 'J LAVERY - 1883' (lower left) and signed, inscribed and dated 'AFTER THE DANCE/J LAVERY/160 BATH/GLASGOW' (on the reverse) oil on canvas 44 ¼ x 34 1/8 in. (112.4 x 86.8 cm.) I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. Given by the artist to Katharine FitzGerald, Lavery’’’’s last secretary, and by descent to her sister, Mrs Fairfax Cholmeley, and thence by descent to the present owner. W.S. Sparrow, John Lavery and his Work, London, 1912, p. 171. K. McConkey, Sir John Lavery, Edinburgh, 1993, p. 22. K. McConkey, John Lavery, A Painter and his World, Glasgow, 2010, p. 20-1. Glasgow, Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts, 1883, no. 154. Edinburgh, Royal Scottish Academy, 1885, no. 589. On loan to Ferens Art Gallery, Kingston-upon-Hull since 1989.
John Lavery - Admiralty Arch, 19th July 1919

John Lavery - Admiralty Arch, 19th July 1919

Original 1919
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Lot number: 64
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Sir John Lavery, R.A., R.H.A., R.S.A. 1856-1941 ADMIRALTY ARCH, 19TH JULY 1919 signed l.l.: J Lavery; titled and signed on the reverse: ADMIRALTY ARCH/ 19 TH JULY 1919./ JOHN LAVERY. oil on canvas 61 by 76cm., 24 by 30in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Acquired from the artist by his secretary Miss Katherine FitzGerald and thence by descent, until c.1985 Exhibited London, Leicester Galleries, Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Sir John Lavery RA, 1941, no.43, illustrated p.4 Literature Kenneth McConkey, Sir John Lavery, 1993, p.146; Kenneth McConkey, John Lavery, A Painter and his World, 2010, p.145 Catalogue Note On 19 July 1919, a Victory Parade and celebrations took place in central London to mark the ending of the Great War (fig 1). Following the Armistice in the previous November, it took until the beginning of the New Year for the dismantling of the war machine to commence. Lavery, having been an Official War Artist was swiftly dispatched to Northern France to record temporary hospitals, supply depots and ordnance stores in the early weeks of 1919 before they were de-commissioned. He and his wife then embarked upon a short holiday at the Sidi-bu-Said on the Bay of Tunis, at the behest of Baron d’’ Erlanger and he was back in London in May, in time to paint Duff Cooper’’s portrait prior to his marriage to Lady Diana Manners on 2 June. All throughout this six-month period, soldiers were returning from the Western Front, and the victory parade led by Field Marshall Haig, General Pershing, Admiral Beatty and the ever-popular Marshal Foch was brought forward, following the signing of the Treaty of Versailles at the end of June and the subsequent parade through Paris on Bastille Day. Edwin Lutyens was summoned to Downing Street and he swiftly produced drawings for a temporary Cenotaph in Whitehall. When the great day arrived, excitement was intense and Lavery repaired to the roof of Carlton House Terrace with other society figures, including the Coopers, to watch the display. The regiments, some 15,000 troops, including 120 members of the Women’’s Legion, now part of the Royal Army Service Corps, were massed in Hyde Park near the Albert Memorial. They then marched through Knightsbridge down the Mall where they performed the tricky manoeuvre of passing through the narrow Admiralty Arch at Lavery’’s vantage point. As was his wont, he took his portable easel with him. This stout wooden box on extendable legs was his essential travelling kit and it enabled him to execute standard 25 x 30 inch canvases and prepared canvas-boards on the spot. He had a long training as an ‘artist-reporter’’ and was used to working quickly. Onlookers did not bother him and when engaged on a painting such as Admiralty Arch, 1919, his concentration was of necessity, intense. As Cunninghame Graham noted, it was impossible to distract him (McConkey 2010, p. 207). The scene nevertheless, presented particular challenges. The procession was constantly moving and it was necessary to operate like a camera, fix upon a particular configuration of parading regiments and record it in the moment. Admiralty Arch, the Mall, and the surrounding streets were bedecked with the flags of the Allies including those of the United States and Japan, and in the foreground, groups of spectators were clearly visible. The joyous mood was intense, and as Duff Cooper noted in his journal, ‘the massed colours were beautiful’’ (John Julius Norwich ed., The Duff Cooper Diaries, 2005, p. 101). Lavery, from the time of his recording of Queen Victoria’’s visit to Glasgow in 1888, was good with pageants, and he would go on to paint Their Majesties’’ Court, 1931 (unlocated) and the coronation procession in 1937 (Museum of London). Important as these moments were, they did not quite match the jubilant mood of the march past at Admiralty Arch. We are grateful to Professor Kenneth McConkey for kindly preparing this catalogue entry. Fig. 1 Victory Celebrations at the Victoria Memorial after the Great War, 1919, photograph at www.forces-war-records.co.uk See More See Less
John Lavery - A Moorish Garden

John Lavery - A Moorish Garden

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Lot number: 66
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Sir John Lavery RHA RA RSA (1856-1941) A Moorish Garden Oil on canvas board, 23 x 34.5cm (9¼ x 13½'') Signed and inscribed to 'Walter Harris' Provenance: ''Modern British and Irish Sale'' Sothebys June 1996 Cat. No. 34 where purchased by current owner. From the 1830s North Africa and the Middle East became places of artistic pilgrimage, but while painters such as Lewis, Lear and Holman Hunt preferred the eastern Mediterranean, in Lavery's era an instant Orient was to be found by simply crossing the Straits of Gibraltar. Where Orientalist painters concentrated upon narrating the Eastern way of life, the rituals of the Mosque and the Harem, Lavery's generation looked to this environment for its colour. His first visit to Morocco took place in 1891, at the instigation of his friends, the Glasgow artists Arthur Melville and Joseph Crawhall. After almost annual visits, in 1903 he bought Dar-el-Midfah ('the House of the Cannon', for a half buried cannon in the garden), a small house in the hills outside Tangier which he continued to visit with his family over the next 20 years. This work shows the garden of Walter Harris's home referred to in Kenneth Mc Conkey's book on Sir John Lavery (1993 p.98) and depicts one of Harris's Moorish maids sitting by the fountain. Walter Harris, a good friend of the artist was ''The Times'' correspondent in Morocco and his house was just a short ride across the beach. Lavery painted Harris's portrait in Fez in 1906 (Full page illustration ''John Lavery: a painter and his world'' by Kenneth Mc Conkey 2010 Fig 115 p.99) which was at the end of a very eventful overland journey the men took in the company of Cunninghame Graham to this famous city which was 100 miles south-east of Tangier and this work was also inscribed to his friend. It has been claimed that for Lavery the strong light, cloudless sky, white walls and bright colour of Arab dress helped to cleanse his eye after sustained periods of studio portraiture. Within a few years of visiting Morocco for the first time, the light sable sketching of his Glasgow period gave way to a richer and more sensuous application. With thanks to Dr Kenneth McConkey whose research formed the basis of this note.
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