Yayoi Kusama

(1929 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Yayoi Kusama
KUSAMA Yayoi Pears, Flower And Mushrooms (three Works)

Sotheby's /Oct 6, 2014
19,138.94 - 38,277.87
26,317.50

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Yayoi Kusama at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Artworks in Arcadja
1592

Some works of Yayoi Kusama

Extracted between 1,592 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Yayoi Kusama - Dots Obsession

Yayoi Kusama - Dots Obsession

Original 1998
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 120
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Yayoi Kusama B. 1929 DOTS OBSESSION signed, titled and dated 1998 on the reverse acrylic on canvas 91 by 117cm.; 35 7/8 by 46 1/8 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York Lars Bohman Gallery, Stockholm Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 2001 With an intensely captivating palette of deep reds beneath the intricate arrangements of the artist’’s signature circular shapes, Yayoi Kusama’’s Dots Obsession is an instantly striking painting from her widely admired oeuvre. The painting at once captures the obsessively repetitive nature of her most distinctive motif, the dot, as well as the extreme variety with which the artist has explored this theme over the course of six decades. Conceived amidst the abstract expressionist-dominated New York art scene of the 1950s, Kusama’’s dot paintings have fascinated audiences throughout the second half of the twentieth century, and continue to do so today. Unlike many artists from her generation, Kusama’’s relentless drive and prolific yet singular obsession with the dot have left her work virtually unaffected by the changing fashions of the art world. Within this seemingly restrictive paradigm, she continues to push the boundaries of the dot paintings with a poetic language that has expanded into sculpture, installation and fashion. After her early white paintings, Kusama embarked on the conquest of a formal territory that broadened the scope of her work far beyond the chromatically restrained aesthetic with which she was initially identified. Rather than a formally reductive undertaking, Kusama’’s paintings tackled the vast expanse of the universe; not as a mythical claim to the connectedness of it all, but because she experienced the world as such. Having been diagnosed with an obsessive-compulsive disorder, the artist perceived the world through a vivid series of potent hallucinations, which she has brilliantly captured in her iconic Dot Obsessions. “My room, my body, the entire universe was filled with [patterns], my self was eliminated, and I had returned and been reduced to the infinity of eternal time and the absolute of space. This was not an allusion but reality” (Yayoi Kusama quoted in: Yayoi Kusama, New York 2000, p. 36). As a powerful reminder of not only Kusama’’s signature artistic achievement, but indeed of her unique experience of the world, Dots Obsession is an outstanding painting from the artist’’s celebrated oeuvre. Executed in a vibrant and visually striking spectrum of reds, it brilliantly captures her original artistic theorem in an exuberant spectacle of colour, infused with the same energy that has continuously characterised her long and prolific career.
Yayoi Kusama - Untitled

Yayoi Kusama - Untitled

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 254
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description Yayoi Kusama (B. 1929) Untitled (Child Mannequin) acrylic on polyester mannequin and wooden stool figure: 41 3/8 x 20 1/8 x 15in. (105 x 51.1 x 38cm.) stool: 17¾ x 13¾ x 13¾in. (45 x 35 x 35cm.) Executed in 1966 Provenance Galerie M.E. Thelen, Essen. Private Collection. Anon. sale, Sotheby's New York, 16 May 2001, lot 153. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner. Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION Literature M. Matsui, ‘Beyond Oedipus: Desiring Production of Yayoi Kusama’’’’, in Parkett, no. 59, 2000 (illustrated in colour, pp. 104-105). L. Hoptman, A. Tatehata and U. Kultermann (eds.), Yayoi Kusama, London 2003 (installation view illustrated in colour, pp. 87 and 93). Exhibited Milan, Galeria d'Arte del Naviglio, Driving Image Show, 1966. This exhibition later travelled to Essen, Galerie M.E. Thelen. Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, no. 69, 1998 (frontispiece; illustrated in colour, unpaged). This exhibition later travelled to New York, Museum of Modern Art; Minneapolis, Walker Art Center and Tokyo, Museum of Contemporary Art. London, Serpentine Gallery, Yayoi Kusama, 2000. View Lot Notes >
Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin Chess Set

Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin Chess Set

Original 2003
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 251
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Yayoi Kusama Pumpkin Chess Set , 2003 hand painted porcelain, leather and wood display overall: 73.7 x 109.2 x 109.2 cm (29 x 42 7/8 x 42 7/8 in.) Each chess piece signed 'Yayoi Kusama' on the underside. Further stamped by the German Porcelain factory Villeroy & Boch. This work is artist’’s proof number 3 from an edition of 7 plus 4 artist's proofs and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. Provenance Victoria Miro, London Private Collection, London Exhibited Australia, Bendigo Art Gallery, The Art of Ch ess, 20 October 2010 - 30 January, 2011, then travelled to Australia, UQ Art Museum (26 February - 24 April 2011), then travelled to London, Saatchi Gallery, (8 September - 3 October 2012) Literature C. Milliard, Checkmate: Saatchi Gallery Unveils Extraordinary Collection of Artistdesigned Chessboards , ARTINFO, London, 7 September, 2012 A. Abrams, Check Mates; The Art of Chess at the Saatchi Gallery , The New York Times Magazine, 17 September 2012
Yayoi Kusama - Pears, Flower And Mushrooms (three Works)

Yayoi Kusama - Pears, Flower And Mushrooms (three Works)

Original 1978
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 701
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Yayoi Kusama B. 1929 PEARS, FLOWER AND MUSHROOMS (THREE WORKS) each: signed in English and dated 1978 or 1979; signed in English, titled in Japanese and dated 1978 or 1979 on the reverse, framed watercolour on paper i & ii) 24 by 27 cm.; 9½ by 10⅝ in. iii) 27 by 24 cm.; 10⅝ by 9½ in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Whitestone Gallery, Tokyo Private Asian Collection
Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin (dflo)

Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin (dflo)

Original 2013
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 1050
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Yayoi Kusama B.1929 PUMPKIN (DFLO) signed and titled in English and dated 2013 on the reverse acrylic on canvas 130.5 by 162.3 cm.; 51⅜ by 63⅞ in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo Acquired by the present owner from the above Private Asian Collection This work is accompanied with an artwork registration card issued by the artist’’s studio Picture-Perfect Pumpkin Yayoi Kusama Yayoi Kusama is an artist who needs little introduction. Arguably the most important living female artist today, responsible in part for revolutionising Abstraction, Expressionism, Emotionalism, Pop Art, Minimalism; responsible for breaking paradigms in all artistic fields and media, Kusama’’s renown has not diminished one bit since her days of standing alongside key figures such as Andy Warhol, George Segal, Donald Judd and Claes Oldenburg. Instead, this fame has simply grown. Now in her mid-eighties, the octogenarian has shown no signs of slowing down. Bursting with energy, Kusama continues to work tirelessly on her pieces, producing captivating and intricate works, each more beautiful and mesmerising than the last. The present work, a meditative Pumpkin (DFLO) (Lot 1050) is a brilliant example of the culmination and maturation of Kusama’’s oeuvre; a testament to the lifelong mantras that have guided her through her artistic career. The artist’’s recent solo exhibition, “Yayoi Kusama: A Dream I Dreamed”, which features more than one hundred pieces of Kusama’’s most recent works, began at the Daegu Art Museum in South Korea in July 2013. This extremely popular and successful show has a schedule that makes its way through some of Asia’’s most significant and well-known museums and art centres, including Shanghai’’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the Seoul Arts Centre, the Taipei Fine Arts Museum, New Delhi’’s National Gallery of Modern Art, and Osaka’’s National Museum of Art. But this is only a small fraction of Kusama’’ s weighty repertoire of exhibitions, which includes shows at the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, as well as shows organised by the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Her diverse exhibition history is testament to the fact that Kusama’’s oeuvre is one that is universal, accessible to all audiences. At once recognisable, the pumpkin is ubiquitous to Kusama’’s works. Aside from featuring the iconic vegetable, Pumpkin (DFLO) is covered in polka dots, rendered in a rich yellow, and set against a wall of nets: all of which are unmistakeable features of the artist’’ s style, a language that has evolved and been perfected through decades of near-obsessive production and reproduction. All the independent elements of the piece reflect a different Kusama philosophy, and though they can each exist strongly on their own, their unification creates a much more compelling narrative that fully captures the artist’’s temperaments. Though their first appearance can be traced back to the artist’’s nihonga practice at the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts in the late forties, the pumpkin only resurfaced in Kusama’’s works in the eighties and nineties, along with the already matured organic polka dot, such as the 1991 three-dimensional mirrored room, Mirror Room (Pumpkin). But its existence in the artist’’s imagination can be traced back further. For Kusama, the pumpkin was, and remains to be, an important memory from her childhood. “The first time I ever saw a pumpkin was when I was in elementary school and went with my grandfather to visit a big seed-harvesting ground…and there it was: a pumpkin the size of a man’’s head…It immediately began speaking to me in a most animated manner.” 1 The anthropomorphised pumpkin can here be seen as highly linked to Kusama’’s other encounters with animated plants and objects, such as her memory of speaking to a talking flower and dog in her childhood. However, unlike the traumatic feelings that the artist associates with the flower and dog, the talking pumpkin had a “generous unpretentiousness” 2 , and emitted a “solid spiritual balance” 3 . These sentiments can most certainly be felt in the present Pumpkin (DFLO) work. There is something undoubtedly peaceful and serene about the pumpkin; it is the very embodiment of life and vigour. Traditionally a symbol of fertility, the pumpkin also gives one a feeling of abundance and joy, not unlike the feelings one would experience when reaping one’’s harvest after an arduous season of work. The present pumpkin also seems to emanate some form of energy, as all the arrows around it point outwards, acting as a magnet of sorts. Thus one can most certainly read the pumpkin as a symbol of strength, a vegetable that cannot simply be governed by external forces. Repetitive net patterns are also a highly representative element of Kusama’’s working method. Starting with the 1958 Infinity Nets— created in the same year that the artist first moved to New York— Kusama’’s nets have become synonymous with “obsession”, a word that has graced many of her interviews, book covers, as well as art reviews. To the artist, this “obsession” with reproduction at the most minute level was and is much more than meets the eye. Looking back on her nets, Kusama remarked that hers was a “method opposite to the emotional space of Abstract Expressionism (which prevailed in New York).” 4 Indeed, working against conventions and forging her own unique path, Kusama’’s method was one that was primarily born of her mental illness; her way of combatting fears through obliteration: “artists do not usually express their own psychological complexes directly, but I use my complexes and fears as subjects...I make them and make them and then keep on making them, until I bury myself in the process. I call this ‘obliteration’’ .” 5 Aside from being a way of fighting her fears, the process of repetition is also a method through which Kusama attains perfection. The more she reproduces an image, the closer to achieving perfection she arrives. Thus, the newly rendered Pumpkin (DFLO) is a true representation of Kusama’’s endeavours to capture beauty and flawlessness. “Forget yourself,” proclaimed Kusama, the “High Priestess of Polka Dots”, on a 1968 flyer for one of her art shows. “Self-Destruction is the only way out – but, after self-destruction comes Resurrection, a new life of oneness, peace and happiness with the other beings of the Universe.” 6 This mantra, of “self-obliterating”, of blurring the lines between where one being ends and the next one begins, has been tremendously representative of Kusama’’s oeuvre. Pumpkin (DFLO) no doubt exhibits this feature: it is hard to tell where the polka dots end and the psychedelic nets begin; it is as if they are one and the same, blending seamlessly into one another, creating an enthralling piece of oneness and cohesion within Kusama’’s Universe. 1 Infinity Net, Yayoi Kusama, trans. Ralph McCarthy, Tate Publishing, London, UK, 2011, p.75 2Infinity Net, Yayoi Kusama, trans. Ralph McCarthy, Tate Publishing, London, UK, 2011, p.76 3 Refer to 2 4 Yayoi Kusama, “A Lone Woman Takes on the International Art World”, Yayoi Kusama Exhibition, Kitakyushu Municipal Museum of Art, Kitakyushu, Japan, 1987, p.117 5 Yayoi Kusama, Tate Modern, 2012 6 Kusama’’s Body Festival in 60’’s, Access Co., Ltd., p.148 Fig. 1 Kusama with Pumpkin sculpture, Fukuoka, 1994 © YAYOI KUSAMA, Image courtesy of Artist Studio
Arcadja LogoProducts
Subscriptions
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscriptions

Who we are
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr