Jeff Koons

United States (1955 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Jeff Koons
KOONS Jeff Dom Pérignon Balloon Venus

Phillips, De Pury & Luxembourg /Jan 22, 2015
18,975.33 - 25,300.44
66,412.50

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Artworks in Arcadja
978

Some works of Jeff Koons

Extracted between 978 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog

Original 2002
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Lot number: 85
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JEFF KOONS (b. 1955) Balloon Dog (Blue) metallic porcelain multiple, 2002, numbered 101/2300, published by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, inconsistencies to the blue surface, otherwise generally in good condition, with original plastic stand, lacking original box Diameter: 10¼ in. (260 mm.) PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK COLLECTION
Jeff Koons - Flowers

Jeff Koons - Flowers

Original 1986
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Lot number: 48
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Jeff Koons B. 1955 FLOWERS stainless steel 31.8 by 45.7 by 30.5cm.; 12 1/2 by 18 by 12in. Executed in 1986, this work is from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist's proof. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Max Hetzler Gallery, Cologne Private Collection, Cologne Private Collection, Cologne Sale: Christie's, London, Post-War and Contemporary Art, 30 June 2009, Lot 28 Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Literature Exhibition Catalogue, Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Jeff Koons, 1988, p. 29, no. 18, illustration of another example Exhibition Catalogue, Kassel, Museum Fridericianum Kassel, Schlaf der Vernunft, 1988, p. 223 (text) Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, The Institute of Contemporary Art, (and travelling), The Binational, American Art in the late 1980s, 1988-89, p. 128, no. 44, illustration of another example Exhibition Catalogue, Newport, Newport Harbor Art Museum, Objectives: The New Sculpture, 1990, p. 88, illustration of another example Angelika Muthesius, Ed., Jeff Koons, Cologne 1992, pp. 86-87, illustration of another example in colour Jeff Koons, Ed., The Jeff Koons Handbook, London 1992, pp. 80-81, illustration of another example in colour Exhibition Catalogue, San Francisco, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Jeff Koons, 1992, n.p., no. 36, illustration of another example in colour Exhibition Catalogue, Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum; and Stuttgart, Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Jeff Koons, 1992-93, p. 49, illustration of another example in colour Exhibition Catalogue, Aarhus, Kunstmuseum Aarhus, Jeff Koons, 1993, p. 48, no. 32, illustration of another example in colour Exhibition Catalogue, New York, Gagosian Gallery, Jeff Koons Andy Warhol: Flowers, 2002, p. 18, illustration of another example in colour Hans Werner Holzwarth, Jeff Koons, Cologne 2009, p. 228, installation view of another example; and pp. 230-31, illustration of another example in colour Exhibition Catalogue, Dusseldorf, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Es geht voran, Kunst der 80er: eine Düsseldorfer Perspektive, 2010, p. 149, installation view of another example Exhibition Catalogue, Frankfurt, Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung, Jeff Koons: The Sculptor, 2012, p. 157, illustration of another example in colour “I thought stainless steel would be a wonderful material, I could polish it, and I could create a fake luxury. I never wanted real luxury, instead, I wanted proletarian luxury, something visually intoxicating, disorientating.” Jeff Koons, ‘Dialogues on Self Acceptance’’, in: Exhibition Catalogue, Basel, Fondation Beyeler, Jeff Koons, 2012, p. 19. Created in 1986, Flowers forms part of Jeff Koons breakthrough body of work: Statuary. First exhibited at Ileana Sonnabend’’s SoHo gallery as part of the feted ‘Neo Geo’’ group show, this series furnished Koons’’ ascension into the high art mainstream. Comprising a total of 10 different sculptures, each cast in immaculate and high-sheen stainless steel, this series brought forth the iconic symbol of late twentieth-century Pop, Rabbit, as well as gleaming interpretations of cultural objects, spanning gift-shop souvenirs and artistic nobilis, from a statuette caricature of Bob Hope to a bust of Louis XIV. In line with the core of Koons’’ practice, these works deliver high art with wide appeal by jubilantly responding to the legacy of Baroque and Rococo through its contemporary subsistence in mass-produced objects. With Statuary, Koons furthered his dialogue with stainless steel, a material that is now regarded the reflective calling card of his acclaimed practice. First utilised for the preceding corpus, Luxury and Degradation – a series in which varying forms of drinking paraphernalia, from crystal decanters and ice buckets to a novelty Jim Beam whiskey train, were cast in stainless steel – Koons realised the conceptual and aspirational potential of stainless steel as an inexpensive material that possessed the lustre of faux luxury. Though posing as a feat of silversmithing, these works are made from an industrial material which only appears lavish. And such is the desired effect for Jeff Koons. From an edition of three, the present work marries an evocation of excessive Rococo flamboyance with manufactured souvenir shop ornament. It is a prime example of Koons democratic artistic strategy. As outlined by the artist: “Statuary presents a panoramic view of society; on the one hand there is Louis XIV and on the other hand there is Bob Hope. If you put art in the hands of the monarch it will reflect his ego and eventually become decorative. If you put art in the hands of the masses it will reflect mass ego and eventually become decorative. If you put art in the hands of Jeff Koons it will reflect my ego and eventually become decorative” ( J eff Koons, ‘Dialogues on Self Acceptance’’, in: Exhibition Catalogue, Basel, Fondation Beyeler, Jeff Koons, 2012, p. 20). Taking a stance that is unabashedly post-modern and socially egalitarian, in 2008 Koons framed his work within the ultimate incarnation of this outlook when a major retrospective of his work was installed in the historic height of opulence that is Versailles. Koons’’ artwork was juxtaposed within the salons of Versailles, including the iconic stainless steel Rabbit from Statuary, the porcelain Michael Jackson and Bubbles from Banality, the erotically charged polychromed wood Large Vase of Flowers from Made in Heaven, and on display on the palace grounds the colossal stainless steel Balloon Flower (Yellow) from his Celebration series. Thus, the super-reflectivity of stainless steel mixed with popular icons sat within the French Rococo opulence of the Ancient Régime. This exhibition was an extraordinary realisation of Koons’’s formative will to heighten the commonplace and abase the noble – a divisive strategy of social leveling first promised in the mid-1980s by the physical and symbolic portent of stainless steel: “I thought stainless steel would be a wonderful material, I could polish it, and I could create a fake luxury. I never wanted real luxury, instead, I wanted proletarian luxury, something visually intoxicating, disorientating” (Jeff Koons, ibid., p. 19). With Statuary, Koons both immortalised mass-market trinkets and simultaneously debased porcelain or masterfully carved marble objets d'art through transforming his carefully chosen motifs into a uniform panorama of gleaming metal. This simultaneous sublimation and desublimation operates on many levels in the present work. Evocative of the virtuosic paintings of flower vases depicted in Dutch still life paintings and Rococoesque table centrepieces, this motif also belongs to the realm of mass-produced porcelain miniatures. It is an object that straddles both High and Low art forms, and as such is a perfect Koonsian symbol for liberating the viewer from the prescribed dictates of taste. Fully broached with Flowers and its Statuary counterparts in 1986, Koons pioneered a modified concept of the Duchampian readymade via the legacy of eighteenth-century art in contemporary culture. Working within the remit of Pop art and its embrace of consumer driven visual culture, Koons has looked to eradicate intellectual guilt and critical shame from an appreciation of mass taste. As Koons explains, “I started to focus on my dialogue about people accepting their own histories… I was just trying to say that whatever you respond to is perfect, that your history and your own cultural background are perfect… that it’’s ok to give in to what you respond to” (Jeff Koons, ibid., p. 24). Through a lexicon of immediately recognisable ‘secular archetypes’’ sourced from consumer goods, historical characters, and celebrity culture, Koons suspends judgment to deliver exalted meaning and big concepts. What drives this strategy is a surprisingly traditional notion of art as a form of ‘self-help,’’ an understanding with its roots in the enlightenment wherein art was conceived as a vehicle for a purer sense of being and empowerment. Heir to Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, Koons is the unmitigated twenty-first century successor to the Pop revolution of the 1960s. Created with the very highest level of craftsmanship and flawlessly finished in immaculately polished stainless steel, Flowers and the other Statuary sculptures were about art being used as a symbol or representation of a certain theme that takes place in art. Fig. 1 Installation view, Kassel Museum Fridericianum, Schlaf der Vernunft, 1988 Artwork: © Jeff Koons Fig. 2 Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder Flowers in a Glass , 1606. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. Image: © Bridgeman Images Fig. 3 Installation view of Louis XIV , Château de Versailles, Jeff Koons Versailles, 2009 Artwork: © Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons - Puppy'

Jeff Koons - Puppy'

Original 1992
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Lot number: 123
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Description: Dried flowers, moss, resin and plastic Spain, 1992 Jeff Koons (born 1955) - US-American artist Marked, titled and dated in the print on the base 'Jeff Koons Puppy 1992' as well 'Hecho a mano' In original box Overall height: 19.3 cm Very good condition Jeff Koons is one of the most controversial artists of the present. His works fetch up millions on the international art market. The highest auction record for an identical puppy sculpture is currently around €3,000 The multiple 'Puppy' by Jeff Koons refers to the same-named sculpture of a dog puppy installed in front of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. Consisting of 17,000 flowers, the sculpture was erected there in 1992. The huge West Highland Terrier is basically a symbiosis of the past and the present. Firstly, it is inspired by the high civilization of 18th century European gardens. Secondly, the puppy in the function of a mascot is a part of the contemporary popular culture. Since the 1980's, Koons has been investigating the phenomenon of 'kitsch' and art, having triggered a debate that has not subsided to this day. Art at the intersection of media, marketing and leisure culture raises the question of whether artworks can be considered as means of mass media communication. The multiple is marked, titled and dated in the print 'Jeff Koons Puppy 1992' as well as 'hecho a mano' (handmade). Technique-related occasional tiny particles of the moss and the dried flowers come off. Apart from that the condition is very good. The height is 19.5 cm. Jeff Koons (b. 1955) The US-American artist Jeff Koons is one of the most successful artists of the present. In his artworks, Koons continually presents himself through pictures. His works are characterized by a garish, loud and colorful style which culminates in his monumental sculptures that oscillate between the poles of 'art' and 'kitsch'. By doing so, the artist catches up with art historical traditions initiated by personalities such as Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol.
Jeff Koons - Dom Pérignon Balloon Venus

Jeff Koons - Dom Pérignon Balloon Venus

Original 2013
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Lot number: 65
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Jeff Koons Dom Pérignon Balloon Venus (Magenta) , 2013 Lacquered polyurethane resin in two parts, with Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 2003, and maintenance kit, 50.5 x 25.5 x 40 cm (19 7/8 x 10 x 15 3/4 in.) impressed signature on the suede interior of the lining, from the edition of 650 (there were also 40 artist's proofs), contained in original custom trunk.
Jeff Koons - Balloon Venus Dom Pérignon

Jeff Koons - Balloon Venus Dom Pérignon

Original 2013
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Lot number: 75
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Jeff Koons B. 1955 BALLOON VENUS DOM PÉRIGNON Executed in 2013, from an edition of 650; Champagne is of vintage 2003. This mark is accompanied by a product brochure, maintenance kit and custom trunk. lacquered polyurethane resin; 1 bottle of Dom Perignon champagne 61.5 (height) x 35.5 x 32.5 cm., 24 1/4 x 14 x 12 3/4 in. The work is in good condition. Upon very close inspection, there is a small bubble, a stain, a paint loss to the body and head balloons of the Venus. Upon close inspection, there is a small stain on the champagne bottle. "In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."
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