Frida Kahlo

(19071954 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Frida Kahlo
KAHLO Frida Survivor

Christie's /May 27, 2010
77,106.95 - 115,660.42
961,656.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Frida

 

Artworks in Arcadja
34

Some works of Frida Kahlo

Extracted between 34 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Frida Kahlo - Portrait Of Miriam Penansky

Frida Kahlo - Portrait Of Miriam Penansky

Original 1929
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 45
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Frida Kahlo (1910-1954) PORTRAIT OF MIRIAM PENANSKY signed and dated AGOSTO 1929 upper left oil on canvas 24 by 18 in. 60 by 47 cm Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Commissioned by Salomon Hale, Mexico Miriam Penansky, Chicago Gift of the above to the previous owner Thence by descent Private Collection, Chicago Exhibited Rome, Scuderie del Quirinale, Frida Kahlo, March 20 – August 31, 2014, p. 26, illustrated in color Literature Salomon Grimberg, Jane C. H. Jacob, and Laurent Sozzani, “Two Frida Kahlo Portraits: One Found, One Confirmed”, IFAR Journal, vol. 14, no. 3, 2013, pp. 22-30, illustrated in color Miriam Penansky, the subject in this recently discovered portrait by Frida Kahlo, was the youngest child of Polish immigrants Evan Ginzburg and Charles Penansky. Born in Chicago in 1908, Miriam traveled to Mexico City in 1929 where she lived with her sister and brother in law, modern art collector Salomon Hale. As a prominent member of the Jewish community in Mexico City, it was Hale who introduced Miriam to Frida Kahlo. The two young women quickly developed an intimate friendship, now immortalized in this recently discovered painting. Once finished, Kahlo photographed the work and inscribed on the back the name "Salomón Hale." This photograph, filed in her personal photographic archive, would later become the key to confirming its existance. Portrait of Miriam Penansky is one of Frida Kahlo’’s earliest attempts at portraiture, the genre she would come to master as one of Mexico’’s most celebrated artists. Painted in 1929, the seminal year in which she married Diego Rivera and joined the Communist party, Portrait of Miriam Penansky encapsulates the beginnings of Kahlo’’s idiosyncratic style. Although she had only been painting for four years, one can already perceive the deeply introspective quality of her work. Equally present are the lessons learned from Mexican Muralism with its characteristic contours and bright colors —influences no doubt internalized through her relationship with Rivera. Once married, Kahlo’’s style continued to evolve. According to her, moving to Coyoacán had “a huge influence as she began making paintings with backgrounds and Mexican things in them.” (1) While she dedicated much of this time to accompanying Rivera on numerous commisions, she managed to complete two other important canvases in 1929: Time Flies and Woman in White, another recently discovered composition. While Kahlo was certainly an innovative artist, her art is not without pictorial sources. It is well known that Kahlo and Rivera shared an interest in Pre-Columbian sculpture and Mexican folk art. Less well-known however are the rich influences that nineteenth-century Mexican portraiture and Spanish colonial painting had in her early work. Kahlo’’s interest in retablo painting, particularly the ex-voto tradition of producing artworks as offerings or give thanks for miracles performed, is evident throughout her work. Another highly popular painting tradition in nineteenth-century Mexico was the very genre of portraiture, as demonstrated by the careers of artists such as José Maria Estrada (1811-62) and Hermenegildo Bustos (1832-1907). The portraiture of Bustos, in particular, was made to commemorate special occasions, and they possess a frankness and immediacy that provide an air of authenticity. Neither the sitters nor the artist appear pretentious, and it is this spirit and tradition that guide Kahlo in her portraits from 1930 to 1939. 1 Frida Kahlo, Song of Herself, Salomon Grimberg, New York, 2008, p. 75. Fig. 1 Frida Kahlo © 1931, 2014 The Imogen Cunningham Trust This work is still stretched on its original stretcher. The paint layer is stable. It shows very slight cracking throughout. Under ultraviolet light it is hard to identify any retouches, but there are 2 or 3 spots of retouch in the upper left – one above and to the right of the signature. The condition overall is good. The painting has been carefully cleaned and no further restoration is recommended. (This condition report has been provided courtesy of Simon Parkes Art Conservation, Inc.) In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
Frida Kahlo - Frida Con Señor Y Niño.

Frida Kahlo - Frida Con Señor Y Niño.

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 58
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Previous Lot Next Lot Click to enlarge Auction 676, Lot # 58 Kahlo, Frida. Ampliación fotográfica, blanco y negro. Frida con señor y niño. 1 x 1 m. Enmarcada. Estimado $3,000-4,000 Return to Catalogue Lot Inquiry Back
Frida Kahlo - Autorretrato En Miniatura

Frida Kahlo - Autorretrato En Miniatura

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 12
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
LOT 12 FRIDA KAHLO (1910-1954) AUTORRETRATO EN MINIATURA signed Mara and dedicated Para Bartoli con amor on thereverse oil on thin panel with tin border 800,000—1,200,000 USD measurements measurements 2 by 1 5/8 in. alternate measurements 5 by 4.2 cm Description signed Mara and dedicated Para Bartoli con amor on thereverse oil on thin panel with tin border PROVENANCE José Bartoli, New York (gift of the artist)Sale: Sotheby's, New York, Latin American Art, November 20, 2000,lot 11, illustrated in color EXHIBITED London, Tate Modern, Frida Kahlo, June 9-October 9, 2005Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, Frida Kahlo, October 27,2007-January 20, 2008; Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art,February 20-May 18, 2008; San Francisco, San Francisco Museum ofArt, June 16-September 28, 2008, no. 65, p. 211, illustrated incolor LITERATURE AND REFERENCES Hayden Herrera, Frida, A Biography of Frida Kahlo, New York,1983, p. 370Martha Zamora, El Pincel de la Angustia, Mexico City, 1987, p.385Helga Pringnitz-Poda, Salomon Grimberg and Andrea Kettenmann, FridaKahlo, Das Gesamtwerl, Frankfurt, 1988, p. 160, no. 114,illustrated in color, p. 257Hayden Herrera, Frida Kahlo, The Paintings, New York, 1991, p. 116,illustrated in color, p. 242, 254Hayden Herrera, Frida Kahlo, New York, 2007, no. 65, p. 211,illustrated in color CATALOGUE NOTE Frida Kahlo's oval Autorretrato en miniatura is thesmallest painting she ever made. It is also one of her mostpowerful. The power does not come, as it does in her portraits ofherself injured or in tears, from the urgency with which shepresents her predicament. Rather it comes from the force of herpresence. Within this tiny oval she has packed a charge of energythat brings to mind the Surrealist poet André Breton's descriptionof her art as "a ribbon around a bomb." Dressed fit to kill in a red Tehuana blouse, ornate silverearrings and an exotic necklace, Frida looks ready to take on theworld. Her sartorial choices had complex motives. When she marriedthe muralist Diego Rivera in 1929 she began to dress in nativeMexican costumes, in part to please her husband, in part to asserther Mexican identity and her allegiance to la raza , and inpart to hide her slight limp cause by a childhood bout with polioand a bus accident at the age of eighteen. No less important, sheloved the sensation her picturesque clothes made as she playedbeauty to Rivera's beast. Frida's long black hair, braided and pinned to her head, istopped by an outlandish bunch of poppy-like flowers with darkcenters. The flowers are arranged so that they look visceral. Inthe top center of the miniature Autorretrato en miniatura red petals come together to form a dark crevasse that suggestsfemale genitals. In Kahlo's work such fleshy flowers could signifypain or joy. In the case of the miniature, I believe they stand forpassion. The way Kahlo painted the flowers out onto the picture'sframe makes her presence immediate and palpable. She bursts out ofthe picture and into our space. That is where she wanted to be; unlike paintings in which Kahloconfronts the viewer (and her own self) with her sufferings, thistiny self-portrait had a happy purpose. It was almost certainlymade as a gift for a friend, but not necessarily for the friend,artist José Bartoli, to whom she finally gave it. Her self-portraitwas a substitute Frida that placed her close to someone she loved.In that way it recalls the oval photographic portraits of theVictorian era, especially to photographs which were inserted inlockets. Kahlo's photographer father must sometimes have taken suchportraits and, as his assistant, Kahlo must have learned to retouchthem. Some time in the mid-1940s Frida Kahlo gave this miniatureAutorretrato en miniatura to her lover, Catalonian artistJose Bartoli (1910-1995) who lived in Mexico from 1942 to 1946.Bartoli was handsome, intelligent, humorous, and passionatelypolitical. His voice was deep and soft; he is remembered as havingbeen e
Frida Kahlo - Survivor

Frida Kahlo - Survivor

Original 1938
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 27
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Frida Kahlo (Mexican 1907-1954) Survivor inscribed by unknown hand 'Survivor by Frida Kahlo de Rivera'(inside the frame) and dedicated by Walter Pach 'Nikifora L. Pachfrom Walter Pach, this picture entitled Survivor by Frida Kahlo deRivera, 151' (on the label on the reverse) oil on metal framed by artist in a handcrafted Oaxacan tinframe 6 5/8 x 4¾ in. (17 x 12 cm.) 16¾ x 14¾ in. (45.5 x 37.5 cm.) including frame Painted in 1938. Provenance Julien Levy Gallery, New York. Walter Pach collection, New York. Gift from the above to the present owner, Athens. Literature 'Ribbon Around Bomb' in The New Yorker, 12 November 1938 (notillustrated). H. Prignitz-Poda, S. Grimberg and A. Kettenmann, Frida Kahlo: DasGesamtwerk, Frankfurt am main: Verlag Neue Kritik, 1988, p. 241,no. 53 (not illustrated, misidentified as the same work as TheAirplane Crash). S. Grimberg, Frida Kahlo The Still Lifes, London, MerrellPublishers, 2008, p. 64 (not illustrated). Exhibited New York, Julien Levy Gallery, Frida Kahlo (Frida Rivera),November 1st- 15th 1938, no. 25. Lot Notes On July 27, 1938, Frida Kahlo wrote to New York Gallery dealerJulien Levy on behalf of Diego Rivera: "My husband has asked me totell you that he is unable to be ready for his exhibition in yourgalleries this fall because he has been ill for the past fourmonths and unable to work." Unwittingly, she had opened the doorthat would lead to her first one-woman exhibition, during November1-15, the dates that had been reserved for Rivera. The catalogue of her paintings listed Between the Curtains (1937),a large self-portrait, first, and Survivor (1938), a miniature of apre-Columbian idol, last. The November 12 issue of The New Yorkerreported that "Walter Pach was the first to buy a painting. It iscalled 'Survivor' and it consists of a Mexican idol looking lonelyon a large field. This symbolizes [Kahlo explained] the survival ofMexico in a shaky world." The price of Survivor was listed as onehundred dollars. Frida Kahlo had arrived in New York for her exhibition with a guestlist drawn up by Rivera, at the top of which were the names ofWalter and Magda Pach. Also in her suitcase was a letter, "AlPintor Walter Pach," dated "Octubre 11, 1938," written in Spanishby Rivera. Mi querido amigo Pach: Time has passed since I wanted to write to you but there is noworse correspondent in the world. There are plenty of excuses. Nopossible forgiveness for me. I take advantage of Frieda's trip tosend you this letter and greet you, your wife, and son.... Irecommend Frieda to you very much, as husband and as admirer of thepainting that she makes, I share this admiration [with] illustriouscompañeros, Breton, for example, is an enthusiast of Frieda'spainting.... de su amigo, Diego Rivera. The significance of Pach in the lives of both Riveras is curiousand cannot be overestimated. Painter, critic, curator, advisor tocollectors such as the Arensbergs, Walter Pach had been responsiblefor bringing the Armory show to New York in 1913, and was the firstto have written about Cézanne in the United States in 1908, and tolecture on van Gogh, etc. In 1916, Pach saw Rivera's painting donewhile in Europe, in Marius de Zayas's gallery on Fifth Avenue; butit was some eight years earlier, while living in Paris, when Pachhad written enthusiastically to Luis de la Rocha about it. Pach wasunaware that he was Rivera's friend and would show the letter toDiego. Rivera never forgot this, and in 1922, when Pach traveled toMexico to lecture at the Universidad, they began a life-longfriendship. Pach would come to his friend's defense time and again.When in 1932, Rivera's Detroit Institute of Arts murals wereunveiled to unbridled criticism--The Detroit News editorialdeclared "the best thing to do would be to whitewash the entirework completely"--Pach ferociously wired from New York: "If thesepaintings are whitewashed, nothing can ever be done to whitewashAmerica." Again, Pach proved faithful in May 1933 when Rivera'sRockefeller Center mural, Man at the Crossroads, was boarded up. Asa leading voice of the art community, he initiated a correspondencewith Mrs. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, with whom he had a friendly,working relationship, asking her to intercede on Rivera's behalf,pleading to at least allow him to finish the mural and leave itcovered for later generations to decide its fate. It wasunimaginable to Pach that the mural's fate was sealed and itsdestruction unavoidable. Remaining loyal to Rivera, he reiteratedto a friend: "Diego is simply great--and his painting isimmense." Julien Levy decided on the title Survivor based on "The surviver"(sic) and "El superviviente," the English and Spanish titlesprovided by Kahlo. Although not immediately apparent, Survivor isan ex-voto, painted in gratitude after having being granted amiracle. Kahlo had survived her first separation from Rivera in1935, his affair with her youngest sister, his request for adivorce, her decision to commit suicide, and after all that, hisreturn home: a mixed blessing, for sure. Survivor shares a similaremotional content with other works also shaped around these events:Self-Portrait with Curly Hair (1935), Me Alone (1937; lost), Memory(1937), I Belong to My Owner (1937; lost), and She Plays Alone(1938). The circumstances that generated the Survivor image clarifyKahlo's earlier description of the painting as mirroring herpersonal situation, her loneliness and survival in her own shakyworld. The gateway of a ruinous dwelling stands abandoned on thehorizon line of an empty plain; it reflects Kahlo's alienation.Long ago, this was the entrance to someplace; now, it is thethreshold to nowhere. Kahlo's resilience is represented by apre-Columbian vessel in the shape of a standing warrior from aburial site in Colima, the western region of Mexico. A crestedhelmet with ear flaps surrounds the spout projecting from the topof the figure's head into which Kahlo has placed an array ofblue-green Quetzal feathers as a headdress. One can only guess whyshe chose feathers from this solitary bird known for not survivingin captivity. Generally, such warriors are depicted in a frozenpose holding a club with both hands; but this one is different.Although unarmed, he is not completely vulnerable; he stands in athreatening pose, right fist raised at an enemy that only he cansee. Kahlo's choice of frame for Survivor poses a clever paradox. Sheused a tin frame made in Oaxaca, like those used to frametestimonies of devotion such as votive paintings. Religious objectsof the poorest order-- such as crosses, milagritos, and otherreligious objects--made of this inexpensive metal are acquired bythose who cannot afford costly silver. Although the painting'semotional content is about survival, tin is about destruction. Tincorrodes, tarnishes, is not resistant to time, and its symbolicvalue is its fleeting shine. It gives the false impression of beingenduring like silver. Maybe that is why the warrior retains histhreatening stance. Although he has survived, as a warrior he knowsthat conflict never really ends and he must continue protectinghimself. He survived one battle but the war continues. It is known that after showing her work in New York, Kahlo traveledto Paris to present an exhibition. It is also known that on arrivalshe learned, much to her chagrin, that André Breton had neithercollected her paintings from customs nor secured a gallery. What isnot known is that Walter Pach saved the day when he contacted hisold friend Marcel Duchamp, asking him to help Kahlo retrieve herpaintings and find a gallery to exhibit them. From this show one ofFrida Kahlo's self- portraits, The Frame, was acquired by theLouvre. Salomon Grimberg Dallas, Texas March 25, 2010 Walter Pach (1883-1958) was among the earliest and one of the mostpassionate promoters of Mexican and Latin American art and artists,in the United States. In the 1910s Pach saw works by Diego Riverain exhibitions in New York, some of which Pach himself participatedin, such as the 1917 and 1918 shows of the Society of IndependentArtists--an organization that Pach helped found. However, the twodid not meet until the summer of 1922, when Pach traveled to MexicoCity to teach a course on Modern art at the National University ofMexico. Rivera, as well as José Clemente Orozco and other artists,attended these classes which had a profound impact on them. Riveraand his wife Guadalupe Marín became close friends with Pach and hisfirst wife, Magdalene. Back in New York in the fall of 1922, Pachorganized the first show of contemporary Mexican art in America forthe 1923 Society of Independent Artists exhibition. From this pointthrough the 1950s, Pach promoted Mexican and Latin American artistsby introducing them to dealers and organizing exhibitions, and inarticles, books, and lectures. The first opportunity Walter Pach had to meet Frida Kahlo was inDetroit early in 1933, where Rivera was at work on his murals forthe Detroit Institute of Arts. When Rivera and Kahlo traveled toNew York that spring for Diego's next commission--the RockefellerCenter murals--they enjoyed many convivial evenings with the Pachsat their Manhattan apartment which had become a gathering place forartists from all over the world. The friendship between the couplescontinued for two decades and was especially strong when the Pachsreturned to Mexico City in 1942-1943, when Walter again taught atthe National University of Mexico. In the fall of 1938, when Kahlo came to Manhattan for her firstone-person show at the Julien Levy Gallery, she again found a warmreception from the Pachs. Not only did the Pachs attend the openingof her exhibition but Walter Pach was also the first to buy apainting--Survivor--which became one of his prized possessions.Pach also wrote a glowing review of her work, "Frida Rivera: GiftedCanvases by an Unselfconscious Surrealist," for the November issueof Art News. This tiny jewel of a painting then disappeared from view--neverhaving been reproduced--and remained in the Pach family for overseventy years. Laurette E. McCarthy, Ph.D.
Frida Kahlo - Survivor

Frida Kahlo - Survivor

Original 1938
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 27
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Frida Kahlo (Mexican 1907-1954) Survivor inscribed by unknown hand 'Survivor by Frida Kahlo de Rivera'(inside the frame) and dedicated by Walter Pach 'Nikifora L. Pachfrom Walter Pach, this picture entitled Survivor by Frida Kahlo deRivera, 151' (on the label on the reverse) oil on metal framed by artist in a handcrafted Oaxacan tinframe 6 5/8 x 4¾ in. (17 x 12 cm.) 16¾ x 14¾ in. (45.5 x 37.5 cm.) including frame Painted in 1938. Provenance Julien Levy Gallery, New York. Walter Pach collection, New York. Gift from the above to the present owner, Athens. Literature 'Ribbon Around Bomb' in The New Yorker, 12 November 1938 (notillustrated). H. Prignitz-Poda, S. Grimberg and A. Kettenmann, Frida Kahlo: DasGesamtwerk, Frankfurt am main: Verlag Neue Kritik, 1988, p. 241,no. 53 (not illustrated, misidentified as the same work as TheAirplane Crash). S. Grimberg, Frida Kahlo The Still Lifes, London, MerrellPublishers, 2008, p. 64 (not illustrated). Exhibited New York, Julien Levy Gallery, Frida Kahlo (Frida Rivera),November 1st- 15th 1938, no. 25. Lot Notes On July 27, 1938, Frida Kahlo wrote to New York Gallery dealerJulien Levy on behalf of Diego Rivera: "My husband has asked me totell you that he is unable to be ready for his exhibition in yourgalleries this fall because he has been ill for the past fourmonths and unable to work." Unwittingly, she had opened the doorthat would lead to her first one-woman exhibition, during November1-15, the dates that had been reserved for Rivera. The catalogue of her paintings listed Between the Curtains (1937),a large self-portrait, first, and Survivor (1938), a miniature of apre-Columbian idol, last. The November 12 issue of The New Yorkerreported that "Walter Pach was the first to buy a painting. It iscalled 'Survivor' and it consists of a Mexican idol looking lonelyon a large field. This symbolizes [Kahlo explained] the survival ofMexico in a shaky world." The price of Survivor was listed as onehundred dollars. Frida Kahlo had arrived in New York for her exhibition with a guestlist drawn up by Rivera, at the top of which were the names ofWalter and Magda Pach. Also in her suitcase was a letter, "AlPintor Walter Pach," dated "Octubre 11, 1938," written in Spanishby Rivera. Mi querido amigo Pach: Time has passed since I wanted to write to you but there is noworse correspondent in the world. There are plenty of excuses. Nopossible forgiveness for me. I take advantage of Frieda's trip tosend you this letter and greet you, your wife, and son.... Irecommend Frieda to you very much, as husband and as admirer of thepainting that she makes, I share this admiration [with] illustriouscompañeros, Breton, for example, is an enthusiast of Frieda'spainting.... de su amigo, Diego Rivera. The significance of Pach in the lives of both Riveras is curiousand cannot be overestimated. Painter, critic, curator, advisor tocollectors such as the Arensbergs, Walter Pach had been responsiblefor bringing the Armory show to New York in 1913, and was the firstto have written about Cézanne in the United States in 1908, and tolecture on van Gogh, etc. In 1916, Pach saw Rivera's painting donewhile in Europe, in Marius de Zayas's gallery on Fifth Avenue; butit was some eight years earlier, while living in Paris, when Pachhad written enthusiastically to Luis de la Rocha about it. Pach wasunaware that he was Rivera's friend and would show the letter toDiego. Rivera never forgot this, and in 1922, when Pach traveled toMexico to lecture at the Universidad, they began a life-longfriendship. Pach would come to his friend's defense time and again.When in 1932, Rivera's Detroit Institute of Arts murals wereunveiled to unbridled criticism--The Detroit News editorialdeclared "the best thing to do would be to whitewash the entirework completely"--Pach ferociously wired from New York: "If thesepaintings are whitewashed, nothing can ever be done to whitewashAmerica." Again, Pach proved faithful in May 1933 when Rivera'sRockefeller Center mural, Man at the Crossroads, was boarded up. Asa leading voice of the art community, he initiated a correspondencewith Mrs. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, with whom he had a friendly,working relationship, asking her to intercede on Rivera's behalf,pleading to at least allow him to finish the mural and leave itcovered for later generations to decide its fate. It wasunimaginable to Pach that the mural's fate was sealed and itsdestruction unavoidable. Remaining loyal to Rivera, he reiteratedto a friend: "Diego is simply great--and his painting isimmense." Julien Levy decided on the title Survivor based on "The surviver"(sic) and "El superviviente," the English and Spanish titlesprovided by Kahlo. Although not immediately apparent, Survivor isan ex-voto, painted in gratitude after having being granted amiracle. Kahlo had survived her first separation from Rivera in1935, his affair with her youngest sister, his request for adivorce, her decision to commit suicide, and after all that, hisreturn home: a mixed blessing, for sure. Survivor shares a similaremotional content with other works also shaped around these events:Self-Portrait with Curly Hair (1935), Me Alone (1937; lost), Memory(1937), I Belong to My Owner (1937; lost), and She Plays Alone(1938). The circumstances that generated the Survivor image clarifyKahlo's earlier description of the painting as mirroring herpersonal situation, her loneliness and survival in her own shakyworld. The gateway of a ruinous dwelling stands abandoned on thehorizon line of an empty plain; it reflects Kahlo's alienation.Long ago, this was the entrance to someplace; now, it is thethreshold to nowhere. Kahlo's resilience is represented by apre-Columbian vessel in the shape of a standing warrior from aburial site in Colima, the western region of Mexico. A crestedhelmet with ear flaps surrounds the spout projecting from the topof the figure's head into which Kahlo has placed an array ofblue-green Quetzal feathers as a headdress. One can only guess whyshe chose feathers from this solitary bird known for not survivingin captivity. Generally, such warriors are depicted in a frozenpose holding a club with both hands; but this one is different.Although unarmed, he is not completely vulnerable; he stands in athreatening pose, right fist raised at an enemy that only he cansee. Kahlo's choice of frame for Survivor poses a clever paradox. Sheused a tin frame made in Oaxaca, like those used to frametestimonies of devotion such as votive paintings. Religious objectsof the poorest order-- such as crosses, milagritos, and otherreligious objects--made of this inexpensive metal are acquired bythose who cannot afford costly silver. Although the painting'semotional content is about survival, tin is about destruction. Tincorrodes, tarnishes, is not resistant to time, and its symbolicvalue is its fleeting shine. It gives the false impression of beingenduring like silver. Maybe that is why the warrior retains histhreatening stance. Although he has survived, as a warrior he knowsthat conflict never really ends and he must continue protectinghimself. He survived one battle but the war continues. It is known that after showing her work in New York, Kahlo traveledto Paris to present an exhibition. It is also known that on arrivalshe learned, much to her chagrin, that André Breton had neithercollected her paintings from customs nor secured a gallery. What isnot known is that Walter Pach saved the day when he contacted hisold friend Marcel Duchamp, asking him to help Kahlo retrieve herpaintings and find a gallery to exhibit them. From this show one ofFrida Kahlo's self- portraits, The Frame, was acquired by theLouvre. Salomon Grimberg Dallas, Texas March 25, 2010 Walter Pach (1883-1958) was among the earliest and one of the mostpassionate promoters of Mexican and Latin American art and artists,in the United States. In the 1910s Pach saw works by Diego Riverain exhibitions in New York, some of which Pach himself participatedin, such as the 1917 and 1918 shows of the Society of IndependentArtists--an organization that Pach helped found. However, the twodid not meet until the summer of 1922, when Pach traveled to MexicoCity to teach a course on Modern art at the National University ofMexico. Rivera, as well as José Clemente Orozco and other artists,attended these classes which had a profound impact on them. Riveraand his wife Guadalupe Marín became close friends with Pach and hisfirst wife, Magdalene. Back in New York in the fall of 1922, Pachorganized the first show of contemporary Mexican art in America forthe 1923 Society of Independent Artists exhibition. From this pointthrough the 1950s, Pach promoted Mexican and Latin American artistsby introducing them to dealers and organizing exhibitions, and inarticles, books, and lectures. The first opportunity Walter Pach had to meet Frida Kahlo was inDetroit early in 1933, where Rivera was at work on his murals forthe Detroit Institute of Arts. When Rivera and Kahlo traveled toNew York that spring for Diego's next commission--the RockefellerCenter murals--they enjoyed many convivial evenings with the Pachsat their Manhattan apartment which had become a gathering place forartists from all over the world. The friendship between the couplescontinued for two decades and was especially strong when the Pachsreturned to Mexico City in 1942-1943, when Walter again taught atthe National University of Mexico. In the fall of 1938, when Kahlo came to Manhattan for her firstone-person show at the Julien Levy Gallery, she again found a warmreception from the Pachs. Not only did the Pachs attend the openingof her exhibition but Walter Pach was also the first to buy apainting--Survivor--which became one of his prized possessions.Pach also wrote a glowing review of her work, "Frida Rivera: GiftedCanvases by an Unselfconscious Surrealist," for the November issueof Art News. This tiny jewel of a painting then disappeared from view--neverhaving been reproduced--and remained in the Pach family for overseventy years. Laurette E. McCarthy, Ph.D.
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