Georgios Jakobides

(Lesbos 1853Athen 1932 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Georgios Jakobides
JAKOBIDES Georgios Portrait Of Mrs Scaramanga

Bonhams /May 17, 2011
66,893.34 - 89,191.12
68,736.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Jakobides George

 

Artworks in Arcadja
53

Some works of Georgios Jakobides

Extracted between 53 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Georgios Jakobides - Naughty Grandson

Georgios Jakobides - Naughty Grandson

Original 1884
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Lot number: 11
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Georgios Jakobides (Greek, 1852-1932) Naughty grandson signed 'G.Jakobides' (upper left) oil on canvas 38.5 x 30 cm. Footnotes Painted after 1884. PROVENANCE: Private collection, Athens. LITERATURE: O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides , Adam editions, Athens 1999, no. 68, p. 72 (illustrated). Georgios Jakobides Retrospective, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum, Athens 2005, no. 39, p. 151 (illustrated). Never had a painter celebrated so much the loving relationship between children and the elderly, this special bond that bridges generations and effortlessly passes on such important values as language, experience and wisdom, than Jakobides, the great 19th century master and keen observer of human nature. The artist was fascinated by the multifaceted contrast between the children's tender and glowing flesh and the wrinkled aged faces scarred by the ravages of time and the predicaments of life. 1 As noted by O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, who prepared the artist's monograph, Jakobides portrayed the special relation between grandfather and grandchild by achieving equal presence in the two figures and by capturing the dual expression on the elderly man's face – pain from having his sideburns roughly pulled and joy from participating in the life of his grandchild. 2 In 1886, around the time he painted the Bonhams picture, Jakobides wrote: "I seek a comical contrast arising from the grouping of two or three persons of different sex or age, always trying to blend, as much as possible, the natural with the beautiful." As early as the 1880s, Jakobides, this leading exponent of the Munich School, had already established his reputation in the Bavarian world especially due to his childhood scenes. The artist had been recognised as the quintessential kindermaler (child painter) precisely because he managed to look beyond beautified sentimental stereotypes and capture a wide variety of expressions, from the most subtle and evocative, as in Girl Reading (sold by Bonhams, Greek Sale, 20.5.2008), to the most contorted, as in Naughty Grandson. Here, the excellent draughtsmanship, the harmonious unity of facial expression and body language and the overall sense of genuineness and lively presence capture with great psychological insight the archetypal bonding between grandfather and grandchild, raising it above personal experience to a level of universality. As uniquely put by the great writer Pavlos Nirvanas, "the miracle of childhood is not something that anybody can capture on canvas. The painters who have managed to capture this miracle and fix it on a flat surface are but few. One of them is Jakobides." 3 1 . See Georgios Jakobides Retrospective, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum, Athens 2005, p. 12; Georgios Jakobides (1853-1932) The Painter of Childhood , 2006 Calendar, National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum. 2 . See O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides, the Painter of Children in Georgios Jakobides Retrospective, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery - A. Soutzos Museum, p. 146. 3 . P. Nirvanas, ,The Painter of Children [in Greek], Pinakothiki journal, 12 (1912-13), pp. 100-101.
Georgios Jakobides - Portrait Of A Girl

Georgios Jakobides - Portrait Of A Girl

Original
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Lot number: 17
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Georgios Jakobides (Greek, 1852-1932) Portrait of a Girl signed in Greek 'G. Jakobides' (upper right) oil on canvas 32 x 25½ in. (81.2 x 64.7 cm.) The family of the artist. Private collection, Athens, circa 1950, acquired directly from the above. Acquired from the above by the present owner. THE PROPERTY OF A GREEK COLLECTOR One of the leading Greek artists of his day, Georgios Jakobides began his training under the formidable direction of Nikiforos Lytras. Under Lytras' instruction at the School of Fine Arts in Athens, Jakobides became a deft draftsman and colorist known for his genre scenes that celebrated Greek identity and folk traditions. In 1877, Jakobides made the decision to follow in his master's footsteps; he moved to Munich to study first-hand the work of those artists who had influenced Lytras' own development when he was a student at the Bavarian capital's Academy of Fine Arts. By the time of Jakobides' arrival in Munich, the city had become an important cultural center; much like Paris, it drew in an international roster of both established and emerging artists. Attracted by the Munich Academy's distinctive bold form of realism, Gustave Courbet, William Merrit Chase, John Twachtman and others all flocked to the city in the late 19th century. In Munich, Jakobides worked under the tutelage of Karl Theodor Piloty, whose dramatic lighting and use of color, became an enduring influence on the aspiring Greek artist. Jakobides also immersed himself in the paintings of the emotive realist Wilhelm Leibl. Leibl's respectful and perspicacious rendering of provincial German life reverberates in Jakobides' interpretation of similar subjects. The vibrant cultural life that Jakobides found in Munich inspired the maturing artist and compelled him to remain in the city for more than two decades. Jakobides' success abroad did not go unnoticed at home. In 1900 he was asked to return to Athens to become the first Director of the National Gallery as well as a professor at the School of Fine Arts where he had begun his studies with Lytras. Despite his prolonged absence, Jakobides thus came to hold significant influence over Greece's artistic climate at the beginning of the 20th century. In addition, he became one of the most sought after portraitists among the city's elite. The present painting of a formal portrait of a bourgeois girl was most likely executed during this later period in Jakobides' career. While her identity remains unknown, she is either the daughter of one of Jakobides' many well-to-do clients who included politicians, businessman, intellectuals and even the Greek royal family or the artist's own niece to whom she bears a striking resemblance. Unlike Jakobides' depictions of peasant children who often appear joyful and uninhibited, his bourgeois children are composed and reserved in their expressions, conforming to the expectations of their class (fig. 1). This young girl sits, like so many of Jakobides' bourgeois models, in a plush armchair set against a dark background. She holds vibrant red flowers, rather than a book that Jakobides often included in his portraits of mature sitters, perhaps to suggest her blooming youth. The flowers' brilliant red interrupts the otherwise dark, monochromatic painting and serves as a unifying device as the color echoes in the girl's flushed cheeks and plump lips as well as in the upholstery of the armchair. While clearly a formal portrait, the girl sits slightly askew. Rather than holding a rigid upright position, she leans to her right, implying a youthful insouciance. The most striking aspect of the work, however, found in the best examples of Jakobides' portraits, is the girl's penetrating gaze that engages the viewer from every angle.
Georgios Jakobides - Allegorical Composition

Georgios Jakobides - Allegorical Composition

Original 1889
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Lot number: 1
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Georgios Jakobides (Greek, 1852-1932) Allegorical composition signed 'G.JAKOBIDES' (lower right) oil on panel 25 x 35.5 cm. Painted in 1889. EXHIBITED: Athens, National Gallery and Museum of Alexander Soutzos, Jakobides Retrospective , 14 November 2005-30 January 2006 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue curated by Olga Mentzanfou-Polyzou, p. 136, no 15). LITERATURE: O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides , Adam Editions, Athens 1999, p. 61 (illustrated). A.Kotidis, Greek Art, 19th Century Painting , Ekdotike Athenon editions, Athens 1995, no 118, pp. 241-242 (discussed), p. 148 (illustrated).
Georgios Jakobides - Portrait Of Mrs Scaramanga

Georgios Jakobides - Portrait Of Mrs Scaramanga

Original 1895
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Lot number: 17
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Georgios Jakobides (Greek, 1852-1932) Portrait of Mrs Scaramanga signed and dated 'G. Jakobides/1895' (upper right) oil on canvas 67 x 52 cm. PROVENANCE: Alexander Filadelfeas, nephew of the Ralli-Scaramanga family. Private collection, Athens. EXHIBITED: Athens, National Gallery and Alexander Soutzos Museum, JakobidesRetrospective, 14 November 2005-30 January 2006. LITERATURE: Olga Metzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides, Athens 1999, Adam Editions, p.154 (illustrated). Olga Metzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides Retrospective, National GalleryEditions, Athens 2005, no 132 (p. 237 illustrated). A marvel of skilful craftsmanship painted at the height ofJakobides' creative powers, Portrait of Mrs Scaramanga isnot just a richly painted piece of modelling but also a fineexample of penetrating portraiture. Sharing in the artist'spleasure in his virtuosity, the viewer also follows him beneath thesurface in his search for a deeper pictorial truth; in his attemptnot only to adroitly capture the contours of the sitter's face andthe wavy lines of her wrinkles, but most importantly to narrate thestories and experiences that lie beneath them. A member of one of the oldest, wealthiest and most prominentfamilies from the island of Chios that had moved to Trieste asearly as the 1820s and excelled in trade and shipping venturesthroughout the 19th century, Mrs Scaramanga is handledby Jakobides with honesty and sensitivity, bringing out her noblepersonality without having to conceal the realities of her age. Asnoted by O. Mentzafou-Polyzou who prepared the artist's monograph,"in Portrait of Mrs Scaramanga , 1895, although the sitter'spose is that of conventional portraits, the artist relies on thetransient effects of light to capture her mood and expression atthat given moment in time. The countenance of the elderlynoblewoman from Trieste with her dark clothes and brightlyilluminated face emerges against a background highlighted by thecomposition's multiple luminosities. Coming from the left, thelight source is directed on the woman's face before it diffuses,smoothening out her deep wrinkles. The light picks up on the purpledress under the dark overcoat and especially on the whiteheadpiece, which reflects the work's colour scheme, while theintense red of the ribbon undermines the work's overall sombreatmosphere." Portraiture preoccupied Jakobides throughout his illustrious careerboth during his years in Munich and following his return to Greecein 1900. Portraits of his German and Greek friends, as well asthose of royalty and many prominent members of Greek society,established him as a leading portraitist of his time. Writing in1912, author Pavlos Nirvanas claimed that "Jakobides is the bestguarantee for the highest quality of work, like a surgeonperforming an operation. Individuals who would have gone to Europeto have their portraits done, now have them painted in Greece." See A. Delis, 'Scaramanga Family' in Encyclopediaof the Hellenic World , Athens 2007. . O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides [in Greek],Adam publ., Athens 1999, p. 156. P. Nirvanas, 'The Painter of Children' [in Greek],Pinakothiki journal, 12 (1912-13), no. 138, August 1912, p.100.
Georgios Jakobides - Peek A Boo

Georgios Jakobides - Peek A Boo

Original 1896
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Lot number: 15
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Georgios Jakobides (Greek, 1852-1932) Peek a boo signed 'G. JAKOBIDES' (lower right) oil on canvas 78.5 x 62 cm. Painted circa 1896. PROVENANCE: Private collection, Athens. EXHIBITED: Munich, Münchener Jahres-Ausstellung, Glaspalast, 1896, p. 18, no.277 (possibly). Athens, Art Exhibition, 3rd Year, Zappeion Hall, 1899, no. 35(possibly). A Munich School masterwork hidden from the public eye for over acentury and discovered in a private collection in Athens, Peek-a-boo is most probably the lost Jakobides exhibited inMunich's prestigious Glaspalast in 1896 under the title Versteckspiel and shown at the Zappeion Hall in Athens threeyears later by the title Kryftoulaki . Accordingto Professor C. Christou, in the 1890s Jakobides produced some ofhis finest works and towards the end of the decade hewas highly esteemed and recognised by both the Greek state and theGerman public. In a critical review of the Athens show published inthe 30.3.1899 issue of the Embros daily, it is perceptively notedthat "Jakobides incorporates two distinct qualities. That of therealist who faithfully depicts the world of appearances and that ofthe idealist who glorifies it. This duality is readily revealed in Peek-a-boo . Few rays of sunlight streaming though the windowsufficed, without distorting truth, to add grace and contribute topoetry." In the sparse interior made famous by his Children'sorchestra , with the characteristic bench along the wall and thepotted plant on the window sill, two young girls play peek-a-boo.The sturdy dark brown Bavarian chair, which features prominently ina photograph of the artist's Munich studio, as well asin two versions of his First steps (National Gallery, Athensand E. Averof Gallery, Metsovo) dominates the picture plane, whilethe two girls, bathed in warm sunlight, full of energy and vigour,breath life to the scene. Light plays a crucial role in building upform and capturing the children's firm bodies, as well as increating an atmosphere of domestic warmth. As noted byMentzafou-Polyzou, in the 1890s light acquired a very specificcharacter in Jakobides' work. The intense contrast between shadyand bright parts became dominant and the outlines were stressed inthe areas where light fell. As his German contemporaries, notablyFritz von Uhde (compare Young woman at the window , c. 1891,Städtische Galerie, Frankfurt), Jakobides used natural lightspilling from the window into the room to invest his figures with acorporeal presence and an underlying sense of structure, lendingthem a leading role in the composition. No longer the knee-length,close-up images of the previous decade, they are recessed to a lessextreme foreground and, captured in full-length and lit from allsides, pulsate full of life and rhythm. The richness ofeffects of interacting colour and light, as well as the importantrole of descriptive detail and the emphasis given to facialexpression, gesture and body language, all achieve their pictorialrealization in a truly personalized and affecting way. Works by Greek painters that record children playing, studying ordoing their chores are quite rare. The overallorientation towards rural genre and the predominance of folklore orethnographic subjects, resulted in a very limited number of worksdepicting children in the Greek urban environment. However, Greekpainters who had an established career abroad, such as PericlesPantazis and Nikolaos Gysis, often painted children with their toys(Compare P. Pantazis, L'enfant au cerceau , Bonhams GreekSale, 10.11.09 and N. Gysis, Eros and the painter , BonhamsGreek Sale, 23.05.06). As far as Jakobides is concerned, the babydepicted in The first music lesson (Bonhams, Greek Sale,11.06.02/10.11.09) is eager to play the horn, while the child in Playtime (Bonhams, Greek Sale, 18.05.10) is totally wrappedin stuffing his boots with pretzel pieces. In Peek-a-boo , aporcelain doll, together with a piece of bread and an apple, arelying discarded on the floor, the children having decided to usetheir imagination and play another game. As Plato used to say, whentwo children get together, a new game is automaticallyinvented! A keen observer of human nature and one of the most sensitive andperceptive painters who delved into childhood's psyche, Jakobides managed to look beyond sentimental stereotypes andcapture not only a wide variety of childhood expressions but alsothe moment of transition from one expression to another. Asuniquely put by the great writer Pavlos Nirvanas, "the miracle ofchildhood is not something that anybody can capture on canvas. Thepainters who have managed to capture this miracle and fix it on aflat surface, as we do with butterflies, careful not to disturb asingle scale from their colourful wings, are but few. One of themis Jakobides." See O. Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides [inGreek], Adam publ., Athens 1999, p. 343 and A. Kouria, 'The Painterof Children' [in Greek], Kathimerini daily, Epta Imeres, 27.2.2000,p. 18. See also M. Papanikolaou, Works by 19th Century GreekPainters at Munich's Art Exhibitions [in Greek], Thessaloniki1978, p. 341, C. Christou, 'Georgios Jakobides' [in Greek] in Greek Painters, vol. 1, From the 19th Century to the 20th ,Melissa publ., Athens 1974, p. 238 and K. Baroutas, The ArtScene and Art Education in 19th Century Athens [in Greek],Smili publ., Athens 1990, pp. 154, 191, 222. Christou, 'Georgios Jakobides', p. 238. Embros daily, 30.3.1899. See L. Iakovidi, Georgios Jakobides [in Greek],Diogenis publ., Athens 1984, p.30. See Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides , pp. 138,184. See also Georgios Jakobides (1853-1932) The Painter ofChildhood , 2006 Calendar, National Gallery-A. SoutzosMuseum. See Mentzafou-Polyzou, Jakobides , p. 140 andKouria, The Child in Modern Greek Art (1833-1922) [inGreek], Dodoni publ., Athens-Yannina 1985, pp. 88, 95, 96. See M. Lambraki-Plaka, 'Georgios Jakobides, the Nobleof the Munich School' [in Greek] in Georgios JakobidesRetrospective , exhibition catalogue., National Gallery-A.Soutzos Museum, Athens 2005, p. 12. P. Nirvanas, 'The Painter of Children' [in Greek],Pinakothiki journal, 12 (1912-13), pp. 100-101.
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