Maria Izquierdo

Mexico (19021955 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Maria Izquierdo
IZQUIERDO Maria Maternidad

Christie's /Nov 18, 2010
108,217.30 - 144,289.73
Not Sold

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Variants on Artist's name :

Izquierdo María

 

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Artworks in Arcadja
35

Some works of Maria Izquierdo

Extracted between 35 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Maria Izquierdo - La Música

Maria Izquierdo - La Música

Original 1945
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 74
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Provenance Aurora Posadas Izquierdo, Mexico City Andrés Blaisten, Mexico City Private Collection, Mexico City Sale: Christie's, New York, Important Latin American Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture, May 17, 1995, lot 219, illustrated in color Exhibited Mexico City, Galería de Arte Moderno, María Izquierdo, Exposición Homenaje, August 1956 Mexico City, Instituto Francés de América Latina, Homenaje a María Izquierdo con motivo del IV Aniversario de su muerte, 1960 Guadalajara, Cada de la Cultura, Pintura Mexicana Actual, 1961 Oslo; Bergen; Warsaw; Stockholm; Rome; Ganta; Menton, 1965-1966, Exposición colectiva. Pintura, grabado y dibujos Mexicanos contemporáneos Mexico City, Museo de Arte Moderno, Homenaje a María Izquierdo, 1971 Mexico City, Instituto Mexicana Norteamericano de Relaciones Culturales, Veinte mujeres notables en la vida de México, 1974 León Guanajuato, Exposición Homenaje a María Izquierdo, 1978 Mexico City, Palacio de Bellas Artes, Homenaje a María Izquierdo, March 7-April 15, 1979 San Juan de Los Lagos, Exposición Homenaje a María Izquierdo, February 17-19, 1984 Mexico City, Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporáneo, María Izquierdo, November 1988-February 1989, no.108-9, pp.234-5, illustrated in color Monterrey, Centro Cultural Plaza Fatima, María Izquierdo, August-November 1989 Monterrey, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, María Izquierdo, October-November 1991 74 María Izquierdo (1902-1955) LA MÚSICA (TWO STUDIES FOR THE MURAL LA MÚSICA) watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper; graphite on paper 8 by 5 1/2 in.; 10 by 8 1/4 in. 20.3 by 14 cm; 25.4 by 21 cm Executed in 1945. (graphite on paper) Estimate 20,000 - 25,000 USD Print Both works are in very good condition overall. The paper is taped to the mat by the reverse of each corner of the paper. The media layer is stable overall and the colors are vibrant. There is a repair tear to the lower right corners. (Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper) The paper is hinged to the mat by the top two corners. There is a one-quarter-inch loss to the lower right corner. A circular brown stain, not inherent to the work, measuring one-half-inch in diameter is present in the upper right quadrant. A half-inch repair horizontal repair tear extends from the center of the left edge. (Graphite on paper)
Maria Izquierdo - Rebozo Rojo

Maria Izquierdo - Rebozo Rojo

Original 1944
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 44
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description María Izquierdo (Mexican 1902-1955) Rebozo rojo (possible portrait of Sra. María Luisa Vargas de Domínguez) signed and dated 'Ma. Izquierdo 1944' (upper left) oil on canvas 48 7/16 x 31 3/8 in. (123 x 79.7 cm.) Painted in 1944. Provenance Oscar Domínguez collection, Mexico. Victor Sarquis y Cond. collection, Mexico. Private collection, Mexico City. Pre-Lot Text Property from a Distinguished Collection Literature M. Michelena, et.al., María Izquierdo. Monografía, Guadalajara Departamento de Bellas Artes, Gobierno del Estado de Jalisco, 1985, p. 147 (illustrated in color). L.M. Schneider, comp., María Izquierdo, Mexico City, Casa de Bolsa CREMI, 1986, p. 124 (illustrated in color). Exhibition catalogue, María Izquierdo, Mexico City, Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporáneo, 1988, p. 340, cat. 91 (illustrated). L-M. Lozano, María Izquierdo: una verdadera pasión por el color, Mexico City, Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y Artes, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, 2002, p. 219 (illustrated in color). View Lot Notes > We are grateful to Professor Luis-Martín Lozano for his assistance in cataloguing this work. Accomplished Mexican modernist María Izquierdo was essentially self-taught having withdrawn from the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico City after attending for only one year, 1928-9. Her limited formal instruction in drawing was never a deterrent--her often-awkward treatment of anatomy and perspective seeming to enhance the character and appeal of her art. Anti-academic and well-versed in the work of her European contemporaries, she found companionship with members of the intellectual vanguard Los contemporáneos, which included her partner Rufino Tamayo and her friend Juan Soriano; like them, she distanced herself from the narrative, political, and nationalist focus of the dominant Mexican mural movement. Izquierdo was committed to expressing a personal vision in her art. She combined her knowledge of the European vanguard (Giorgio De Chirico and Paul Gauguin, for example) with her sensitivity to local color and artesanía (handcrafts) in her portraits, still lives, circus scenes, alacenas (cupboards), female nudes set in mythological lands, and metaphysical landscapes. While a single mother with three young children, she was determined to establish an artistic career for herself. Represented by Inés Amor's Galería de Arte Mexicano she found early national and international success, becoming the first Mexican female artist to have a solo show in New York City (at Frances Flynn Paine's Art Center Gallery in 1930). By 1943, art critic Justino Fernández writing for the daily Hoy, had pronounced Izquierdo, "the only woman painter of any importance to have emerged to this day."[1] Izquierdo produced many portraits in the early-to-mid 1940s; several, according to art historian Sylvia Navarrete, were commissions secured by the artist's then-husband and promoter, the Chilean Raúl Uribe, who she married in 1944 and eventually divorced.[2] Independent curator Elizabeth Ferrer comments that Izquierdo endowed these portraits with a "commanding presence."[3] With their, "round heads, wide-set almond-shaped eyes, arched eyebrows, and full sensuous lips, they were cast, whether consciously or not, in her own image," as is the case, to an extent, with Rebozo rojo of this period.[4] Thought possibly to portray María Luisa Vargas de Domínguez, the sitter is wrapped in Izquierdo's red silk shawl; this symbol of feminine power and mexicanidad (Mexicanness) also appears in Autorretrato of 1940, and along with the same regal, yellow-and-blue handcrafted chair, in Mi tía of 1945 as well. A marked shift from Izquierdo's previous portraiture is apparent in Rebozo rojo. Absent is Izquierdo's more common primitivizing approach to the figure--a shortening of limbs, mask-like sculpting of the head and face, dark palette, frontality, and rigidity. nineteenth- century portraitist José María Estrada and Le Douanier Rousseau, so important to Izquierdo's portraits elsewhere, are invisible here. Soft, blended brushstrokes, uniform lighting, convincing anatomical proportions, and spatial recession replace the former roughness and texture, flattening of form and compressed, shallow spaces. The purposeful crudeness or rawness, typical of Izquierdo's earlier work, here is held in check. Instead, arresting in its quiet elegance and noble grace, Rebozo rojo boasts a more naturalistic approach to form and color. Teresa Eckmann, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Latin American Art History, University of Texas, San Antonio 1 Justino Fernández, "María Izquierdo" reprinted in María Izquierdo (Guadalajara: Departamento de Bellas Artes, Gobierno de Jalisco, 1985), 31. 2 Sylvia Navarrette, "María Izquierdo" in María Izquierdo (Mexico City: Centro Cultural Arte Contemporáneo, 1988), 82. 3 Elizabeth Ferrer, "María Izquierdo" in Latin American Artists of the Twentieth Century, ed. Waldo Rasmussen et al. (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1993), 118. 4 Elizabeth Ferrer, 118. This painting is part of the National Heritage of Mexico and cannot be removed from that country. Accordingly, it is offered for sale in New York from the catalogue and will not be available in New York. Delivery of the painting will be made in Mexico in compliance with local requirements. Prospective buyers may contact Christie's representatives in Mexico for an appointment to view the work.
Maria Izquierdo - Caballos En El Río

Maria Izquierdo - Caballos En El Río

Original 1940
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Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 2
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description María Izquierdo (Mexican 1902-1955) Caballos en el río signed and dated 'M. Izquierdo.40' (lower left) gouache on paper 13¾ x 17½ in. (34.9 x 44.5 cm.) Executed in 1940. Provenance Far Gallery, New York. Private collection, New York. Acquired from the above by the present owner. Literature Exhibition catalogue, María Izquierdo, Mexico City, Centro Cultural Arte Contemporáneo, 1988, p. 322 (illustrated). View Lot Notes › We are grateful to Mr. Andrés Blaisten for his assistance in confirming the authenticity of this work; to be included in the forthcoming Catálogo General on the artist being prepared by the Fundación Andrés Blaisten.
Maria Izquierdo - Maternidad

Maria Izquierdo - Maternidad

Original 1944
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 5
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
María Izquierdo (Mexican 1902-1955) Maternidad signed and dated 'M. Izquierdo. 44' (upper right) oil on canvas 33½ x 27 5/8 in. (85 x 70.2 cm.) Painted in 1944. Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY OF A SOUTH AMERICAN COLLECTION Provenance Pablo Neruda, Santiago (gift from the artist). Private collection, Rome (gift from the above). By descent. Acquired from the above by the present owner. Lot Notes We are grateful to Mr. Andrés Blaisten for his assistance inconfirming the authenticity of this work. María Izquierdo was among the first women in Mexico to earn herliving as a professional painter. She was an internationallyrenowned artist in her lifetime and remains one of the most notablefigures in twentieth-century Mexican art history. Since the startof her career in the late 1920s, critics and colleagues havecelebrated Izquierdo's art for its robust color and quintessentialMexican-ness. Like many modern artists, she was committed tocreating art concerned with the life and experience of the Mexicanpeople. In 1944, as part of President Manuel Ávila Camacho's program topromote Mexico's cultural mission both at home and abroad,Izquierdo was chosen to represent the nation as a culturalambassador to South America. Her campaigns in Peru and Chile were agreat personal success. More than fifty works of art were sent fromMexico to exhibit and sell, in addition to what she painted whileshe was there.(1) In Santiago de Chile, she was honored by theacclaimed poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda. Izquierdo and her secondhusband Raúl Uribe, a Chilean painter, became good friends withNeruda during his own diplomatic tenure as Consul General in MexicoCity from 1940 to 1943.(2) Izquierdo gave this painting as a giftto Neruda during the artist's stay in Chile. Women were often the subjects of her paintings throughout hercareer, and maternity images in particular became a potent motif inher work in the decade of the 1940s. Through the symbol ofmotherhood, Izquierdo explored aspects of ethnicity, class, gender,nationhood, and cultural tradition. In Maternidad from 1944, a redrebozo, a shawl typically worn by native women, is draped over thehead of the sitter; the length of fabric covers her arms as shecradles her baby. For artists of the Mexican School, the rebozointentionally conflated canonical images of the veiled Virgin Maryand the rural, ethnically Mexican mother. In this way, the figurebecomes an effective allegorical symbol of the nation, as notionsof fecundity and protection commingle with race, religion, and therural. In addition to portraying an archetypal Mexican woman, thispainting depicts one woman in particular: Izquierdo herself.Maternidad is a self-portrait, especially evinced by the distinctcurvature of the figure's lips and deep-set eyes. In assuming theidentity of the Virgin Mother figure, Izquierdo merges her personalidentity with Mexican national identity and with Mexican art.Further, in aligning herself with the Virgin Mary, the country'smost revered and popular woman by any measure, Izquierdo elevatesherself to icon status. This was a critical strategy for a femaleartist determined to position herself in the public eye and in acompetitive, male-dominated profession. Her own name, María,reinforces her likeness to her Madonna portraits. Izquierdo's paintings are simultaneously infused with traditionalideals and a modern sensibility. Through her numerous maternityimages as well as public statements made by the artist, Izquierdodemonstrated a high regard for motherhood. Indeed, in this era,motherhood was considered widely as a woman's paramount socialrole. In Maternidad the portrayal of the female figure, with hergently tilted head and softly fixed gaze, renders the act ofmothering as something noble and sacred. At the same time, contraryto typical devotional images, this mother appears powerful andsensuous, accentuated by the fiery red rebozo that envelops her.Izquierdo revered cultural tradition, and she was also aprogressive modern woman. As a professional artist, a publicfigure, a divorced woman, and a mother of three children, Izquierdooccupied an unusual place in modern gender politics. Celeste Donovan. 1) S. Navarrete, "María Izquierdo," in María Izquierdo, Mexico,D.F., Centro Cultural/Arte Contemporáneo, A.C., 1988, 89-90. 2) O. Paz, "María Izquierdo, Seen in Her Surroundings and Set inHer Proper Place," in Essays on Mexican Art, New York, HarcourtBrace & Company, 1993, 257-258.
Maria Izquierdo - Maternidad

Maria Izquierdo - Maternidad

Original 1944
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 5
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
María Izquierdo (Mexican 1902-1955) Maternidad signed and dated 'M. Izquierdo. 44' (upper right) oil on canvas 33½ x 27 5/8 in. (85 x 70.2 cm.) Painted in 1944. Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY OF A SOUTH AMERICAN COLLECTION Provenance Pablo Neruda, Santiago (gift from the artist). Private collection, Rome (gift from the above). By descent. Acquired from the above by the present owner. Lot Notes We are grateful to Mr. Andrés Blaisten for his assistance inconfirming the authenticity of this work. María Izquierdo was among the first women in Mexico to earn herliving as a professional painter. She was an internationallyrenowned artist in her lifetime and remains one of the most notablefigures in twentieth-century Mexican art history. Since the startof her career in the late 1920s, critics and colleagues havecelebrated Izquierdo's art for its robust color and quintessentialMexican-ness. Like many modern artists, she was committed tocreating art concerned with the life and experience of the Mexicanpeople. In 1944, as part of President Manuel Ávila Camacho's program topromote Mexico's cultural mission both at home and abroad,Izquierdo was chosen to represent the nation as a culturalambassador to South America. Her campaigns in Peru and Chile were agreat personal success. More than fifty works of art were sent fromMexico to exhibit and sell, in addition to what she painted whileshe was there.(1) In Santiago de Chile, she was honored by theacclaimed poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda. Izquierdo and her secondhusband Raúl Uribe, a Chilean painter, became good friends withNeruda during his own diplomatic tenure as Consul General in MexicoCity from 1940 to 1943.(2) Izquierdo gave this painting as a giftto Neruda during the artist's stay in Chile. Women were often the subjects of her paintings throughout hercareer, and maternity images in particular became a potent motif inher work in the decade of the 1940s. Through the symbol ofmotherhood, Izquierdo explored aspects of ethnicity, class, gender,nationhood, and cultural tradition. In Maternidad from 1944, a redrebozo, a shawl typically worn by native women, is draped over thehead of the sitter; the length of fabric covers her arms as shecradles her baby. For artists of the Mexican School, the rebozointentionally conflated canonical images of the veiled Virgin Maryand the rural, ethnically Mexican mother. In this way, the figurebecomes an effective allegorical symbol of the nation, as notionsof fecundity and protection commingle with race, religion, and therural. In addition to portraying an archetypal Mexican woman, thispainting depicts one woman in particular: Izquierdo herself.Maternidad is a self-portrait, especially evinced by the distinctcurvature of the figure's lips and deep-set eyes. In assuming theidentity of the Virgin Mother figure, Izquierdo merges her personalidentity with Mexican national identity and with Mexican art.Further, in aligning herself with the Virgin Mary, the country'smost revered and popular woman by any measure, Izquierdo elevatesherself to icon status. This was a critical strategy for a femaleartist determined to position herself in the public eye and in acompetitive, male-dominated profession. Her own name, María,reinforces her likeness to her Madonna portraits. Izquierdo's paintings are simultaneously infused with traditionalideals and a modern sensibility. Through her numerous maternityimages as well as public statements made by the artist, Izquierdodemonstrated a high regard for motherhood. Indeed, in this era,motherhood was considered widely as a woman's paramount socialrole. In Maternidad the portrayal of the female figure, with hergently tilted head and softly fixed gaze, renders the act ofmothering as something noble and sacred. At the same time, contraryto typical devotional images, this mother appears powerful andsensuous, accentuated by the fiery red rebozo that envelops her.Izquierdo revered cultural tradition, and she was also aprogressive modern woman. As a professional artist, a publicfigure, a divorced woman, and a mother of three children, Izquierdooccupied an unusual place in modern gender politics. Celeste Donovan. 1) S. Navarrete, "María Izquierdo," in María Izquierdo, Mexico,D.F., Centro Cultural/Arte Contemporáneo, A.C., 1988, 89-90. 2) O. Paz, "María Izquierdo, Seen in Her Surroundings and Set inHer Proper Place," in Essays on Mexican Art, New York, HarcourtBrace & Company, 1993, 257-258.
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