Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer

United States (1830 -  1908 ) Wikipedia® : Harriet Goodhue Hosmer
HOSMER Harriet Goodhue Daphne

Brunk Auctions
May 19, 2017
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Harriet Goodhue Hosmer at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Harriet Goodhue Hosmer, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Isidore Jules Bonheur, Scipione Tadolini, Prosper D' Épinay, George Frampton, Alfred Gilbert, Francesco Barzaghi, Herbert Haseltine
Artworks in Arcadja
6

Some works of Harriet Goodhue Hosmer

Extracted between 6 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Daphne

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Daphne

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 935
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (Massachusetts/Italy, 1830-1908) Daphne, signed on verso truncation "Harriet Hosmer/Fecit Romae", marble on integral socle, 28-1/4 in. slight grime Lot Notes: Harriet Hosmer was the first woman to successfully join the cadre of neo-classical sculptors in the 19th century, a male-dominated profession. Conner-Rosenkranz, New York (label on underside of integral socle); Estate of Marjorie and Charles West
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Puck On A Toadstool

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Puck On A Toadstool

Original
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 259
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description:

HARRIET HOSMER (AMERICAN 1830-1908)
PUCK ON A TOADSTOOL, CIRCA 1856
white marble, signed 'HARRIET HOSMER FECIT ROMAE'; on a scagliola Sienna marble square plinth
79cm high; pedestal 93cm high
Notes:

Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908) was arguably the leading female sculptor of the 19th century. Throughout her career she battled against the myth that sculpture was physically beyond women's capabilities.

Coming from a privileged background outside Boston, Massachussets, she studied anatomy with her physician father before moving to Rome aged nineteen to continue her training under the Welsh sculptor John Gibson. While in Rome she associated with a group of ex-pat artists and writers including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thackeray, George Eliot and George Sand. Hosmer's privilege enabled her to overcome female restrictions to a certain extent, her family was wealthy enough to support her through her studies and she attended respected schools making valuable connections that would lead to beneficial patrons. It was financial security that allowed her to choose her own subjects and ultimately her skill as a sculptor that won her recognition.

She became known for her untraditional depictions of female subjects and was considered at the time an "emancipated female" as she undertook everyday activities unaccompanied. Critics resorted to highlighting her unfeminine childhood in which she ran, swam and rowed to explain her "masculine" ambitions. Many of her works explored female figures in either captive or desperate situations at the hands of men. Often choosing classical tales, she would depict moments of despair, such as her Medusa (1854) at the moment she loses her beauty to become a monster, or her Oenone (1855) as she is left by her husband Paris. The most famous sculpture in this vein is her masterpiece, Zenobia. Queen Zenobia ruled Palmrya until it was sacked by the Roman Emperor Aurelian and she was taken prisoner. Hosmer studied various literary and historical works for her portrayal, all written by men, describing Zenobia as defeated and weighed down with jewels and unable to walk. Hosmer's Zenobia refuses to conform to this historical account, she stands defiant as a prisoner with less jewellery and the only chains on her wrists being manacles. The figure is stoic, head held high, carrying her restraints and exuding authority in a situation to be overcome
rather than defeated by.

The fine figure of Puck on a Toadstool demonstrates Hosmer's talent for capturing the spirit of her subject. Literary themes were very popular in the 19th century and Hosmer chose the
mischievous fairy from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Executed at a time when her finances were running low, the figure was immediately successful, being purchased by the Prince of Wales and the Crown Princess of Germany who, upon seeing the work, remarked, "Oh, Miss Hosmer, you have such talent for toes!" The commercial success of Puck on a Toadstool enabled the sculptor freedom to explore other subjects. "I have another order for Puck; he has already brought me his weight in silver." Harriet Hosmer, in Cornelia Crow Carr, ed., Harriet Hosmer: Letters and Memories, 1913.

In 1858, two years after creating Puck, Hosmer created a companion piece to the work, this time borrowing from folklore with her treatment of Will-o-the-Wisp which didn't achieve the same level of popularity as Puck on a Toadstool.
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Zenobia In Chains

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - Zenobia In Chains

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 59
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
signed:
Harriet Hosmer me sculpsit romae

marble

PROVENANCEAlmon Griswold, New York, acquired in 1864
EXHIBITED
International Exhibition, London, 1962. Fine Art Institute, Derby Gallery, 625 Broadway, New York, November
1864. Childs and Jenks Art Gallery, Tremont Street, Boston,June
1864 Unknown Gallery, Chicago, 1865.
LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
"Harriet Hosmer," Cosmopolitan Art Journal 3 (Dec.
1859), pp. 214-17.Art Journal Illustrated Catalogue of the International
Exhibition of 1862 (London, 1862) o.320. "Art: Harriet Hosmer's Zenobia," Atlantic Monthly 15
(Feb.1865), pp. 248-50. "Miss Hosmer's Statue of Zenobia," New. Path. vol.2, April
1865, pp49-53 Cornelia Carr (ed.), Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, John
Lane, the Bodley Head: New York, 1915. L. Taft, The History of American Sculpture, New York, 1930,
p.209. S. van Rensselaer, Harriet Hosmer, Antiques, October 1963,
pp.424-8 J. Withers, Artistic Women and Women Artists, Art Journal vol.35,
no.4 1976 pp.330-336. S. Waller, "The Artist, the Writer, and the Queen; Hosmer, Jameson
and Zenobia," Womens Art Journal, 1983, vol.4, no.1,
pp.21-28. J.S. Kasson, Marble, Queens and Captives, Yae University Press: New
Haven and London, 1990, pp.141-65. D. Sherwood, Harriet Hosmer, American Sculpture 1830-1908, Columbia
and London, 1991 S. Green, "Harriet Hosmer: Sculpting Women and Men," Gender &
History, vol.6, no.1, April 1994, p.10. Sarah E. Kelly, "Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra," Art Institute of
Chicago Museum Studies 30, 1 (2004), pp. 8-9. G. Gopinath, "Harriet Hosmer and the Feminine Sublime," Oxford Art
Journal, vol. 28, no. 1, March 2005, pp.61-81.
CATALOGUE NOTE
Zenobia in Chains is the most important work of the
American sculptor Harriet Hosmer's (1830-1908) career. Until
recently it was believed that the eight-foot high marble of the
Syrian queen had been lost or destroyed. Although other Hosmer
sculptures are preserved in the Art Institute of Chicago, the
Wadsworth Atheneum and the Metropolitian Museum of Art, the
rediscovery of this original marble is highly signifigant for
understanding the oeuvre of the female sculptor that John Gibson
deemed as having "uncommon talent." Zenobia, the queen of Palmyra (in modern-day Syria), ruled together
with her husband, Odenathus, until his death in 276 A.D. when she
became queen regent. Zenobia was a fair but firm ruler who extended
the boundaries of her state as far as Arabia and Egypt. The Roman
emperors Gallienus and Claudius tolerated this encroachment on
Roman territories, as they feared the prowess of her army. However,
when Aurelian came into power in 270 A.D., he decided to challenge
Palmyra's expansion. After two loosing battles, Zenobia was
captured and brought to Rome. Hosmer's marble depicts a majestic
Zenobia paraded through the streets of the Imperial City by her
captor's army. She grasps the chains that bind her in her left
hand; her right arm rests defiantly on her side. Her posture is
distinguished and regal and her gaze is steadfast as she defiantly
strides through the city. Aurelian was so impressed with Zenobia's
strength through adversity, he freed her and granted her a villa in
Tivoli. Harriet Hosmer was a remarkable sculptor and woman who defied the
19th-century notions of femininity. She led what was considered at
the time to be a bohemian lifestyle. Born in Watertown,
Massachusetts, Hosmer knew at the age of 19 that she wanted to be a
sculptor. Early on she flouted convention and went to St. Louis to
study anatomy at the all-male Washington University Medical School.
In 1852 she departed for Rome to study with John Gibson. In Rome
she developed close friendships within the Anglo-American community
including the Brownings and Nathaniel Hawthorn. Hosmer received
many noted commissions, but the Zenobia In Chains was of
her own accord. The plaster was completed in 1859 and by 1862
Hosmer was prepared to exhibit the sculpture at the International
Exhibition in London. From 1864-6 the marble traveled to Derby's
Gallery in New York, Jenk's Gallery in Boston and to Chicago.
Hosmer sold the present marble to Almon Griswold of New York in
1864 as well as four copies to Mrs. Potter Palmer of Chicago,
Robert W. Emmons of Boston, and Alexander T. Stewart of New York.
From old photographs, these versions vary from the original in the
articulation of the belt buckle. There has been much made of Hosmer's choice of subject matter and
its feminist and personal implications. Hosmer wrote that she
picked Zenobia for "her womanly modesty, her manly courage, and her
intellectual tastes." The sculpture does undoubtedly reflect
Hosmer's sympathy for women's right, but her response to the bland
and submissive depictions of femininity is not only achieved solely
through iconography but also through the sculpture's materiality
and surface treatment. The present marble is not concerned with
verisimilitude; in this arena Hosmer had already proved her prowess
(fig. 1). Zenobia in Chains is Hosmer's embodiment of the
ideal female form: solid and block like. In following the ideals of
the 18th century art-theorist Johann Joachim Winkelmann
(1717-1768), Hosmer sought the feminine "sublime" by deliberately
not provoking desire and by renouncing any assertions of bias. By
Hosmer's interpretation, the denial of movement through
transfiguration to stone was the ultimate form of feminine
freedom. Ironically, Hosmer's Zenobia was still met with a
traditional response. In Hosmer's own words "a woman artist who has
been honored by frequent commissions, is an object of peculiar
odium." Although the sculpture itself received the praise of many
of her contemporaries and was lauded for its beauty and superiority
to the antique, two journals believed it was far too good to have
been carved by a woman, "It was so beautiful and exquisite in his
heralding of the Grecian ideal that it invoked cries that the
marble was not, in fact, by Hosmer, but a work of Gibson or one of
her many studio assistants." Hosmer was outraged "I hope and trust
that I may soon be involved in a law suit. For seven years it has
been whispered about that I do not do my own work but employ a man
to do it for me." Harriet Hosmer was a talented artist and a woman ahead of her time.
The Zenobia in the Chains is the apogee of her
extraordinary career. The majestic marble is so remarkable in its
modeling and the depth of meaning that when complete no one
believed a woman could have carved her. Hosmer, however, was as
steadfast as her subject, if less stoic, for when a younger woman
artist enquired to Hosmer as the first thing a woman artist should
learn, Hosmer replied, "learn to be laughed at, and learn as
quickly as you can."
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - The Sleeping Faun

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - The Sleeping Faun

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 103
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908)
The Sleeping Faun
signed 'HARRIET HOSMER FECIT ROMAE' and inscribed with title 'THE SLEEPING FAUN' (along the base)
marble
29½ in. (75 cm.) high
Provenance
Sotheby's, London, 8 July 2003, lot 218.
Acquired by the present owner from the above.
Lot Notes
Hosmer first modeled The Sleeping Faun as a response to her teacher's, John Gibson's, Sleeping Shepard Boy, first sculpted in 1824. The Sleeping Faun was first exhibited in 1865 in Dublin, Ireland. There are five known versions of the sculpture, one of which is in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - The Sleeping Faun

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer - The Sleeping Faun

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 7
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer AMERICAN THE SLEEPING FAUN 1830 - 1908 signed:H. HOSMER ROMEand entitled:THE SLEEPING FAUN white marble, on a mottled white marble base 79 by 105cm., 31 1/8 by 41 3/8 in. overall Provenance Sotheby's London, 8 July 2003, lot 218
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr