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Edward Hicks

United States (1780 -  1849 ) Wikipedia® : Edward Hicks
HICKS Edward  Penn's Treaty

Christie's /Jan 25, 2013
Not disclosed
1,907,583.15

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Artworks in Arcadja
30

Some works of Edward Hicks

Extracted between 30 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Edward Hicks - Landscape With Three Figures

Edward Hicks - Landscape With Three Figures

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 428
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Edward Hicks (American 1780-1849) , oil oncanvas landscape with three figures, a dog, and another figurelooking on from a distance, probably the artist, 16" x 20".Exhibited: The Art Museum of Princeton University, May-July 1993,American Art from the Class of 1953 Collections. Another work byHicks from the same collection was offered at Sotheby's on January22, 2016, lot 1591. Provenance: Descended in the family of theoriginal owner until purchased by the present owner.
Edward Hicks - The Old Democrat: Portrait Of Andrew Jackson

Edward Hicks - The Old Democrat: Portrait Of Andrew Jackson

Original
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Lot number: 1591
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Edward Hicks (1780 - 1849) THE OLD DEMOCRAT: PORTRAIT OF ANDREW JACKSON oil on panel 10 in. by 21 in. Provenance Descended in a Bucks County and Newtown, Pennsylvania family said to be related to Edward Hicks. A member of the family was named after Edward Hicks. The Quaker side of the family worshipped in the Church where Hicks preached. Exhibited Princeton, New Jersey, The Princeton University Art Museum, 1992; Brooklyn, New York, The Brooklyn Museum, 1992; Doylestown, Pennsylvania, The Mercer Museum, 2000.
Edward Hicks - Jonathan And David At The Stone Ezel

Edward Hicks - Jonathan And David At The Stone Ezel

Original
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Lot number: 657
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Edward Hicks 1780 - 1849 JONATHAN AND DAVID AT THE STONE EZEL Painted in Newtown, Pennsylvania, taken from engraving by C. Tiebout after etching by James Akin after oil by William Hogarth; on the original red painted stretcher inscribed: PAINTED BY EDW. HICKS IN HIS 67TH Y oil on canvas 24 in. by 31 3/4 in. DATED 1847 Provenance Estate of Leonardo L. Beans; Sotheby's, New York, Estate of Leonardo L. Beans, November 21, 1980, sale 4479, lot 33; Christie's, New York, The Gordon Collection of Folk Americana, January 15, 1999, sale 9052, lot 277; Jonathan Trace, Cortlandt Manor, New York. Catalogue Note "Beside the Ezel, David and Jonathan embrace, as in the first Book of Samuel, chapter 20, and Jonathan bids David, his beloved friend, 'Go in peace.' King Saul, father of Jonathan, had sworn to kill David. The two friends had therefore made a covenant that if an arrow from the quiver of the youth who is seen disappearing toward the city should fall nearer the Ezel stone than near David, he must flee. 'The Lord be between me and thee, and between my seed and they seed forever,' Jonathan intones. Might they not, in their regalia, almost join the Indians of one of the Penn's Treaty oils as Hicks conceived it? In any case, the painting is a votive of brotherly love meant to unite sharply divided Friends. Like the Peaceable Kingdom that not so long ago turned up in Vineland, New Jersey, it is inscribed, '...painted by Edw. Hiscks in the 67th year.' From somewhere in Bucks County the painting traveled to the shop of a dealer, where it remained until 1980. What has remained unknown until now is that this vision of peace was actually derived, in part, from an engraving in the Hicks family Bible that is signed by both Isaac and Edward Hicks. The detail of the Good Samaritan (Luke, x, 1:37)--engraved by C. Tiebout from an etching by James Akin after an oil by William Hogarth--was the source. Akin was better known for his satirical subjects. Isaac Hicks bought the Bible--published in Philadelphia in 1801--on February 23, 1802, and entered the date. The Bible remained in the Hicks family until the 1970s, when the rare pencil sketch of a log cabin in a clearing was found folded inside it. Hicks had eased the print out, pressed it into service, then returned it to its place. Whether Hicks had drawn a circle around himself or become, for the time being, a pariah, his isolation served posterity in 1846. But he was not ready to be shelved, even if his business suffered. He broke out of his aloofness to drive to Warminster Meeting, by way of Whitemarsh, to see Sarah's sister Susan Worstall Phipps. The call was one of the 'most heavenly occasions.'"
Edward Hicks -  Penn's Treaty

Edward Hicks - Penn's Treaty

Original
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Lot number: 105
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Lot Description Edward Hicks (1780-1849) Penn's Treaty oil on canvas 17¾ x 23¾ in. Lot Condition Report I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. View Condition Report Provenance By descent in the artist's family Robert W. Carle, South Salem, Connecticut (Edward Hicks's great-grandson) Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut A Private Collector Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York Pre-Lot Text Property of a Distinguished American Collection Literature Paul A. W. Wallace, Seeds of a Nation, (New York, 1962) (illustrated on the cover) Leon Anthony Arkus, "Edward Hicks 1780-1849", Three Self-Taught Pennsylvania Artists: Hicks, Kane, Pippin (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1966), p. 16 Hirschl & Adler Galleries, American Folk Art, (New York, 1977), no. 31, p. 27 Eleanor Price Mather and Dorothy Canning Miller, Edward Hicks: His Peacable Kingdoms and Other Paintings, (New York, 1983), no. 86, p. 175 Alice Ford, Edward Hicks: His Life and Art, (New York, 1985), p. 118 (referenced) Exhibited New York, United States Section of the International Commission on Folk Art, Exhibition of Folk Art, 1935. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Three Self-Taught Pennsylvania Artists: Hicks, Kane, Pippin, 1966. New York, Hirschl & Adler Galleries, American Folk Art, 26 November -29 December 1977. View Lot Notes ›
Edward Hicks - Peaceable Kingdom Of The Banner

Edward Hicks - Peaceable Kingdom Of The Banner

Original 1830
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Lot number: 21
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Measurements 17 1/2 in. by 23 1/4 in. alternate measurements 44.5 cm by 59.1 cm DESCRIPTION painted 1829-1830 The painting is in its original cherry-veneered frame withcorner blocks, handlettered by the artist. oil on canvas PROVENANCE The artist, to his daughter Sarah B. Hicks Perry, to herdaughter Tacie Perry Willets, to her daughter Mabel WilletsAbendroth, to her daughter Cordelia Abendroth Flanagan Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York EXHIBITED Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, American Naive and Folk Artof the Nineteenth Century, January 16 - February 28, 1974; colorcover, The Kennedy Quarterly, Volume XIII, Number One, January1974 LITERATURE AND REFERENCES Frederic Newlin Price, Edward Hicks, 1780-1849, a pampletpublished by the Benjamin West Society, Swarthmore College,Pennsylvania, 1945, page 27, Number 64 CATALOGUE NOTE "Peaceable Kingdoms with Quakers Bearing Banners of thiskind may have been influenced by the historic separation betweenFriends. At least five examples are known which appear to have beenpainted between 1827 and 1835; one of the group is dated 1832. Theyrepresent the earliest departure that Hicks made from the engravingon which he depended. A leopard couchant with a long snake-liketail, which becomes a trademark in later Kingdoms , makes itsfirst appearance in this series. The cockatrice's den, brooding andmysterious below the gathered creatures in paintings from Hick'slater periods, is barely suggested here. Despite the perspectiveused in portraying the band of Quakers on the left, these earlypaintings are enclosed and two-dimensional in appearance. The symbolism of the Quakers bearing a streamer from Calvary, orfrom Pendle Hill, is suggested in a passage from a long poemwritten by Hicks himself: Sweet peace, the Saviour's legacy of loveDescended on them from the Heaven above.Then mercy smiled and justice sat surrene,While Heavenly glory filled the space between.High on the mount, conspicuous to the sight,Friends stood alone, environed round the light.Then let them stand there, let the people knowThey cannot mingle with the world below." (Excerpted from Edward Hicks/1780-1849/A Special ExhibitionDevoted to His Life and Work, introduction and chronology byAlice Ford, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection,Williamsburg, Virginia, September 30 – October 30, 1960, page12) "Here Penn's Treaty is replaced by a pyramid of plain-coatedFriends, and around them twines a banner inscribed, 'Behold I bringglad tidings of great joy. Peace on earth and good will to men.'Far above them on the hilltop shine thirteen rays of light." "But it was Mary C. Black who first perceived a connectionbetween these six Kingdoms and the Separation which dividedOrthodox and Hicksite Friends in 1827, a discovery confirmed byFrederick Tolles when he identified the figure of Elias Hicks inthe front row of each of the six canvases: the pose was clearlyrecognizable from a silhouette circulated in 1830, the year of theQuaker leader's death. Tolles also detected, at the apex of thepyramid, the three pathfinders of early Quakerism: Fox preaching,Penn with arms characteristically outstretched, and Barclay theapologist with book in hand – a trio to which the artist oftenrefers in his Memoirs ." "This interpretation is certainly consistent with the officialHicksite position, which attributed the source of the conflict tothe inquisitional methods of orthodoxy rather than to doctrinalattitudes: 'Whatever the peculiar view of the Orthodox brethren maybe on particular doctrinal subjects, no exception has been takenagainst them on this account. The point at issue was the assumptionand exercise of undue power.' Or, to quote the artist's owntypically anti-British statement, 'neither Elias Hicks nor hisdoctrine had anything to do with our Quaker revolution inPennsylvania, which originated in a contest between therepublicanism of William Penn, planted in America and watered andcherished by free institutions of our country, and the aristocracyof the Yearly Meeting of London, under the influence of the Britishhierarchy. We can well believe that the painter's conscious intent incomposing Kingdoms with Quakers Bearing Banners was to portray theprogress of religious liberty. But, as a practical matter of fact,the issues of religious freedom and doctrine were inseparable. Andit proved as impossible to keep Elias Hicks out of the paintings asout of the controversy itself. Not only does the venerable Quakerappear in the front row of all these canvases, but in two cases hisdoctrine is spelled out verbally. 'Mind the light within', readsthe banner." (Excerpted from Eleanore Price Mather, "A Quaker Icon: The InnerKingdom of Edward Hicks," The Art Quarterly , Volume XXXVI,Numbers 1/2, Spring/Summer 1973, pages 88 & 89)
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