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Heffel

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Some works sold by Heffel

Leon Bellefleur - Nenuphars Étoiles

Leon Bellefleur - Nenuphars Étoiles

Original 1965
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Price:

Lot number: 5
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Description:
Léon Bellefleur AANFM CAS PY QMG 1910 - 2007 Canadian Nenuphars étoiles gouache on paper signed, dated 1965 and inscribed "no. 5" and on verso titled and titled on the gallery label and inscribed "5" 23 1/2 x 17 3/4 in 59.7 x 45.1cm Provenance: Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, England Please note: this work is unframed.
Hermann Nitsch - Untitled

Hermann Nitsch - Untitled

Original 1986
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Price:

Lot number: 209
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Description:
Hermann Nitsch 1938 - Austrian Untitled oil on burlap on verso signed and dated 1986 and dated on the stretcher 78 x 118 in 198.1 x 299.7cm Provenance: Lonti Ebers Fine Arts Inc., Toronto Private Collection, British Columbia Literature: Susan Jarosi, “Traumatic Subjectivity and the Continuum of History: Hermann Nitsch’s Orgies Mysteries Theater,” Art History 36.4, 2013, pages 834 - 863 For the Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch and his compatriots in Vienna Actionism, art is in no way a mere representation of life or reality but instead an intimate, often violent, part of it. He is best known for his many elaborate “Actions” since the late 1950s, extreme theatrical productions initiated that reached a climax in a six-day performance of the ongoing Orgies Mysteries Theater in 1998. Never passive observers, audience members participated in these events. American “Happenings” guru Allan Kaprow contextualized the purposeful excesses of Nitsch’s actions by describing the artist as “the Grünewald of Happenings,” a reference to the sixteenth century German master’s Isenheim Altarpiece (circa 1512 - 1516), which depicts Christ’s suffering during the Passion in grisly, naturalistic detail. Ritual and violence are, for Nitsch, a legacy of Christianity that can be explored in art. Art historian Susan Jarosi elaborates: “In the effort to illuminate and even reanimate the continuum of historical violence prosecuted in the name of institutional power, Nitsch restages and interweaves violent foundational narratives of Western myth and religion and destructive historical events with their successive iterative expressions in a multitude of symbolic forms.” Untitled is part of an extensive series of so-called “splatter paintings” begun by Nitsch in the 1980s. Already stapled to its stretcher, the canvas was placed on the floor to activate the performance dimensions of painting. Nitsch would hurl pigment onto the canvas from its perimeter, which yielded a thick buildup of paint in some areas and a splash effect in others. He then instructed assistants to walk across the wet surface in specific ways, making a unique record of the interactions of materials, artist and other participants. At least two pairs of feet and one set of hands are discernable here. Just as the blood red pigment seems to explode outward from the confines of its support, so too the traces of bodies registered by the footprints track through, and by implication well beyond, the canvas. The splatter paintings are performative in themselves and in their imbrication with Nitsch’s more elaborate actions. An active witness to the Orgies Mysteries Theater in 1998 makes the connections between painting and ritual clear: “Audience members were led up the flight of stairs into the dimly lit space and instructed to stand only on the stretcher bars of the canvases on the floor. Working with buckets of blood, brooms, and large brushes, and proceeding briskly but methodically from one end of the hall to the other, Nitsch and several assistants threw, poured, and painted blood over the floor and walls as the audience did its best to dodge both the painters and the splattering blood. As a result, the spectators’ movements were very much dictated by the path of the painting action, and we were forced to squeeze ourselves against one wall and then the opposite.” Involved though its creation was with Nitsch’s other performances, Untitled can also be considered more immediately. It tests the parameters of abstract painting as a category and challenges a conventional, formal reading of what we see on its surface. While Nitsch’s splatter technique consciously makes reference to Action Painting, for example, the traces of the human body that it records make the painting immediately material and corporeal rather than abstract in the sense of being removed from nature. Untitled implores us to question barriers we may want to establish between art and life. We thank Mark Cheetham, author of Abstract Art Against Autonomy: Infection, Resistance, and Cure Since the 60s, for contributing this essay. Please note: this work is unframed.
Helen Galloway Mc Nicoll -  Farm Yard In Brittany

Helen Galloway Mc Nicoll - Farm Yard In Brittany

Original 1100
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Lot number: 153
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Description:
Helen Galloway Mc Nicoll ARCA RBA 1879 - 1915 Canadian Farm Yard in Brittany oil on canvas on verso titled on the gallery label and stamped with the Studio Helen Mc Nicoll estate stamp 10 x 13 in 25.4 x 33cm Provenance: A.K. Prakash, Toronto Peter Ohler Fine Arts Ltd., Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver Born into a wealthy family in Montreal, Helen Mc Nicoll took classes at the Art Association of Montreal, then went abroad to study and travel in England, France and Italy. On one of her several visits to France, she stayed in Paris for three months and painted in the surrounding countryside. As a consequence of Mc Nicoll’s exposure to the French Impressionists, her palette was transformed by their light-filled hues and emphasis on atmosphere. In her sketching trips to the French countryside, she was attracted to natural subjects such as these humble farm dwellings washed by the sun. To the right is a pile of hay, a subject made iconic by the French Impressionists, as in Claude Monet’s famous Haystacks. In Farm Yard in Brittany, Mc Nicoll captures the warmth of the sun and the tranquility that pervades the scene. Her handling of the delicate interplay of light and shadow is assured, as is her fluid brushwork. Mc Nicoll died suddenly in England in 1915, at the height of her career. She is renowned as one of Canada’s finest Impressionist painters, and her rare and beautiful work is much sought after by collectors.
David Brown Milne - Lipstick Ii

David Brown Milne - Lipstick Ii

After 1952
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Lot number: 706
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Description:
Lot # 706 The James and Elizabeth Eayrs Collection Online auction , David Brown Milne , CGP CSGA CSPWC 1882 - 1953 Canadian Lipstick II watercolour on paper on verso titled Lipstick, dated February 1952 by Douglas Duncan and numbered w. 615 (crossed out) and 690 13 1/2 x 20 1/4 in 34.3 x 51.4cm Provenance: Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Robertson Galleries, Ottawa, 1967 Mr. & Mrs. D.H. Fullerton, 1967 Collection of James and Elizabeth Eayrs, Toronto, 1972 Literature: David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, page 973, reproduced page 973, catalogue #503.32 Exhibited: Robertson Galleries, Ottawa, Drawings and Water Colours by David Milne and Le Moine Fitz Gerald, September 25 - October 7, 1967 On January 18, 1952, David Milne wrote the following entry in his diary: "Painted the lip-stick one again. Still improving, better organized, less confusion. Two figures, angels. One looking in the mirror of a compact after using lipstick. The other just lighting, curious about some cosmetic gadget in front of her. Three other angels across the top, getting interested. Rather bright coloured, with warm gray bands on each side of the figures, a very open composition." ,
Maud Lewis - Two Deer

Maud Lewis - Two Deer

Original
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Price:

Lot number: 1
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Description:
Lot # 001 Folk Art: Works by Maud Lewis & Joe Norris Online auction Maud Lewis 1903 - 1970 Canadian Two Deer oil on board signed 12 1/4 x 10 1/4 in 31.1 x 26cm Provenance: By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver Born in South Ohio, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Maud Lewis is renowned for her bright paintings of Maritime rural life. Having contracted polio, and suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Lewis left school at the age of 14 and lived a confined but happy life at home. She began her artistic career by painting Christmas cards with her mother that they sold on the streets of Yarmouth. Following the death of her parents, Lewis moved to Marshalltown, Digby County, Nova Scotia to live with her aunt. It was there that she met her future husband, Everett Lewis, a fish peddler. They married in 1938 and moved into his small cabin. She continued to paint cards and began to paint scenes on wood panels. Everett often took Maud with him while selling fish and would promote her artwork to his customers. With his encouragement, Lewis began to produce more paintings. Her work grew in popularity, and buyers began to come directly to her home to acquire her paintings. Despite her lack of formal training, Lewis’s depictions of rural life, animals and landscapes, drawn from her everyday experiences, have an irresistible charm and vitality. She often used oil paints straight from the tube and rarely mixed her pigments, and her colourful work expressed the essence of Maritime life. Her work gained popularity to the point that she was featured in numerous newspapers, such as the Moncton Times, the Atlantic Advocate and the Star Weekly, and she also starred in a CBC-TV Telescope program in 1965. In 1967, her work was shown at the Centennial Exhibition of Primitive Art in New Brunswick at Beaverbrook House, St. John. Prominent collectors of her work include R.L. Stanfield, the former premier of Nova Scotia and Richard Nixon, the former President of the United States. Her paintings still hang in the White House and the Legislative Building of Nova Scotia. Lewis passed away at the Digby General Hospital at the age of 67 in 1970. She has become one of Canada’s most well-known and endearing folk artists. The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia has a large collection of her paintings, and installed her original house in the gallery as part of a permanent exhibition of her work. In 2016, a film was released on her life entitled Maudie which was screened at film festivals in Canada, the United States and Europe to positive critical reviews, and which has brought more awareness to the work of this Maritime treasure. Please note: this work is unframed.
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