Suzuki Harunobu

(17251770 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Suzuki Harunobu
HARUNOBU Suzuki Ladies Smoking And Talking On A Veranda

Christie's /Jan 20, 2013
2,457.00 - 3,685.50
2,389.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Harunobu

 

Along with Suzuki Harunobu, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Kitagawa Utamaro, Sawa Sekkyo, Ippitsusai Buncho, Okumura Masanobu, Chokosai Eisho, Nishikawa Sukenobu, Isoda Koryusai
Artworks in Arcadja
251

Some works of Suzuki Harunobu

Extracted between 251 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Suzuki Harunobu - Sensu No Seiran

Suzuki Harunobu - Sensu No Seiran

Original 1770
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Lot number: 252
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
WOODBLOCK PRINTS Various Properties Suzuki Harunobu (1725-1770) Circa 1765-1770 Two chuban shunga prints: one depicting Sensu no seiran (Clearing Storm of the Folding Fan) from the series Furyu zashiki hakkei (Fashionable Eight Views of the Parlour), 18.7cm x 27.7cm (7 3/8in x 10 7/8in) ; one of Shiohama no shugetsu (Autumn Moon Shining Over the Beach at Shio) from the series Furyu Edo hakkei (Eight Views of Contemporary Edo), 20.5cm x 28.4cm (8 1/8in x 11¼in) ; each depicting a couple making love, unsigned . (2). Footnotes 中判錦絵 春画 二枚 鈴木春信 風流座敷八景 他 1765-1770年頃
Suzuki Harunobu - Interrupting Courtesans Reading A Letter

Suzuki Harunobu - Interrupting Courtesans Reading A Letter

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 578
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Suzuki Harunobu (1725?-1770) Interrupting courtesans reading a letter Woodcut; a young man enters an interior through parted curtains to find a courtesan standing over a seated assistant who is rapt in a letter next to a brazier, signed Harunobu ga--good impression, purple pigment slightly faded, light soil 11 x 8¼in. (28 x 21.2cm.)
Suzuki Harunobu -  Dressing Courtesan

Suzuki Harunobu - Dressing Courtesan

Original 1770
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Gross Price
Lot number: 558
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
SUZUKI HARUNOBU (1724-1770) AND ISODA KORYÛSAI (1735-1790) From a Dutch collection Hashira-e . Dressing courtesan. Text in cloud over image. Signed: Koryusai. 1770. Fair impression, black stains bleeding from verso, several horizontal creases, framed. The text in the cloud indicates that the key block had been carved around the death of Harunobu and that the (design of the) colour blocks have been added by Koryûsai.
Suzuki Harunobu - Ladies Smoking And Talking On A Veranda

Suzuki Harunobu - Ladies Smoking And Talking On A Veranda

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 160
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Suzuki Harunobu (1724-1770) Two woodblock prints - the first of ladies smoking and talking on a veranda, signed Harunobu ga; the second of two young girls looking through telescopes, signed Harunobu ga, both framed and glazed, the frames applied with tortoiseshell and with brass inventory labels 'D809' and 'D809' Both chuban (29cm. x 21.5cm. and 27.7 x 21.4cm. respectively) (2)
Suzuki Harunobu - A Woman Seated At A Writing Desk Looking Out At The Rain

Suzuki Harunobu - A Woman Seated At A Writing Desk Looking Out At The Rain

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 1
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description SUZUKI HARUNOBU (1724-1770) A woman seated at a writing desk looking out at the rain, signed Suzuki Harunobu ga, framed and glazed Aiban tate-e Pre-Lot Text Interiors in the Japanese Aesthetic Michael Smith Inc. I'm drawn to the serenity and balance in Japanese art. There is a spare and very deliberate use of line that reads as utterly simple, but also incredibly noble and heroic. It's proof of the paradox that simplicity can be unbelievably rich. Virtually every kind of Japanese art is compelling, from basketwork to bronzes. Each piece carries the touch of the hand, and makes a western interior feel warmer and more worldly. Japanese craftsmen intuitively know how to bring out the essence of a material, whether it's straw or metal, wood or stone. Even a simple, utilitarian object like a teakettle transcends its function and becomes a model of refinement. I'll often steer my clients toward Japanese screens to go with their contemporary art, because I think there's a direct correlation in terms of composition. The screens seem to be poised on that tipping point between representation and abstraction, allowing the viewer to fill in the blanks between the abstraction of the line and the thing it represents, whether it's an object or a landscape. Any work that makes you participate like that is captivating. It's almost like listening to someone tell you the first sentences of a story. Your mind races to know the rest. My interest is not limited to any one type or period. I look at Japanese art in the same way I look at any work, focusing not just on provenance but on what it says to me and what it will bring to a room. Japanese art looks great in any kind of interior. It adds a sense of breath and lightness to a room. Japanese ceramics have a purity of shape that creates the same kind of impact as a sculpture by Brancusi or a painting by Morandi. The forms are so powerful that the negative space around them seems to become charged with energy as well. Imari porcelain tempts me with its eccentricities of pattern and saturated colors-cobalt blue, burnt red, and lustrous gold. I'm far from alone in my appreciation. Marie Antoinette collected Japanese lacquer, building on an initial group of pieces bequeathed to her by her mother, Maria Theresa, Empress of Austria, who famously declared that she valued her lacquer boxes more than her diamonds. Lacquer, to me, is an otherworldly material. You look into it and see your reflection in its depths. I use a low, lacquered Japanese dining table as a coffee table in my Manhattan living room. Two old kimono trunks double as side tables. I put a tonsu chest in a kitchen in Malibu. Japanese furniture has a very clean sense of purpose. There's a kind of minimalism-a clarity of form and an elegance to the finish-no matter whether the piece is simple and nave or embellished with intricate decoration. I think that's one reason why it coexists so harmoniously with other styles. Yet it's never cold. There's none of that mechanized, machine-made quality. Even though it may be extraordinarily precise, you still perceive it as made by the hand of man. And that involves a certain kind of acceptance. If the wood has a knot or the glaze drips, it gets incorporated into the work and becomes a feature. Japanese art respects the character of a material, and it is not afraid to reveal the process. In fact, it celebrates it. Michael Smith is one of the world's leading interior designers, using a blend of European classicism and American modernism. In 2010 he was appointed by President Obama to the Committee for the Preservation of the White House. MORNING SESSION AT 10.30AM LOT 1 - 247 VARIOUS PROPERTIES
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