Keith Haring

United States (Cutztown 1958New York 1990 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Keith Haring
HARING Keith Kutztown Connection

Freeman /May 3, 2015
1,112.68 - 1,483.57
1,780.32

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Artworks in Arcadja
2956

Some works of Keith Haring

Extracted between 2,956 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Keith Haring -  Untitled

Keith Haring - Untitled

Original 1985
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Lot number: 74
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Description:
Untitled (from Three Lithographs) Keith Haring #16 of 80 Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower right sheet Dimensions: Sheet: 32" x 40"; Frame: 36.5" x 44" Artist or Maker: Keith Haring Literature: Literature: Littman, Klaus, ed. Keith Haring: Editions on Paper, 1982-1990 . Stuttgart: Cantz, 1993. 39. Medium: Color lithograph on paper Date: 1985
Keith Haring - The Blueprint Drawings

Keith Haring - The Blueprint Drawings

Original 1990
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Lot number: 202
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KEITH HARING The Blueprint Drawings. Screenprint on cream wove paper, 1990. 1080x1370 mm; 42 1/2x54 inches, full margins. Signed, dated and numbered 21/33 in pencil, lower right. Published by the Durham Press, Durham. From the same-title series. A superb, evenly printed impression. Littmann p. 177.
Keith Haring - Untitled

Keith Haring - Untitled

Original 1984
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Lot number: 11
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KEITH HARING (1958-1990) Untitled , 1984 with the artist's insignia and dated '84' (lower edge); signed, inscribed and dated 'K. Haring March 5-84 Australia' (on the reverse) Sumi ink on paper 33 7/8 x 48in. (86 x 121.8cm) Footnotes Provenance Private Collection, California. "I had been invited through the government arts commission on a grant to Australia to do several projects in very official museums, the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne and the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney. The National Gallery in Melbourne was their version of the Metropolitan. It was a huge building with a huge glass front wall that had a constant stream of water running down the front. I did a painting on that wall from the inside with the water turned off so I could concentrate. It turned into this major controversy and was even on the front page of the newspaper because people there saw it as an aboriginal work. Before I went there, I was not very conscious of the history of aboriginal art. I realized when I got to Australia that because it was sort of a new country, there is no really distinct culture there beside the original aboriginal. So for the government to bring a young American-to do what they basically thought was aboriginal art-was an insult. They felt like I had ripped off the aboriginals. In the center panel of the wall, there was this huge figure that was giving birth, and inside the head was this concentric circle that looked, I suppose, a little too much like a target. About a month after I had left, the center panel ended up getting a shot put through it and the whole thing had to be removed" 1 - Keith Haring Keith Haring's accomplishments were staggering in his short thirty years before passing away from complications due to AIDS. The importance of Haring's oeuvre may be appreciated in a purely art historical sense, but to truly understand his work one must view it in the context of his personal mission. Altruistic in the truest sense of the word, even 25 years after his death, it is evident that Haring imbued a sense of equality and acceptance while promoting social justice in every image he rendered. Haring grew up in Kutztown, Pennsylvania in a relatively sheltered suburban environment. His father was an engineer and hobbyist cartoonist, and it was in drawing cartoons together that Haring first felt he wanted to be an artist. Haring explained how his "father made cartoons. Since I was little, I had been doing cartoons, creating characters and stories. In my mind, though, there was a separation between cartooning and being an 'artist'." 2 At the wishes of his family, Haring studied commercial and graphic design, quickly abandoning his practical edification and coming to New York in 1978 on a scholarship to the School of the Visual Arts. At SVA, he studied under light artist Keith Sonnier and conceptual practitioner Joseph Kosuth. It was Haring's exposure to underground punk culture in the East Village combined with an exploration of his own gay identity within an established queer community that finally allowed him become the artist he aspired to be: one who was able to promote an agenda of social activism utilizing a visual vocabulary of abstraction was distinctively his own. He promoted "a more holistic and basic idea of wanting to incorporate [art] into every part of life, less as an egotistical exercise and more natural somehow....taking it off the pedestal...giving it back to the people, I guess." 3 His primal use of line was universally accessible, conveying ubiquitous representations of love, sex, and death. Influenced by contemporaries who bridged the gap between the popular society and the art world at large such as Christo and Jean-Claude and Andy Warhol, Haring was determined for his work to make an impact on the public. This desire manifested itself in the form of graffiti art, and his early 'subway drawings'. Utilizing unused advertising panels covered with matte black paper, Haring worked with what was available to him - claiming public space as his own. His smooth cartoon-like gestures formed his iconic figures, leaning on both abstraction and simplicity. Reminiscent of Jean Dubuffet's Primitivism, the product was images that were as urban as they were erudite. His style was reductive and Modern, but unlike the Avant-Garde of the 1920s, it was important to Haring that his work "have some connection to the real world." 4 Untitled (1984) is a quintessential example of Haring's unique ability to force the viewer to look at images in a new way. The black and red palette evokes Dubuffet, Mickey Mouse, and the work of his close friend Jean-Michel Basquiat. The image itself, presumably of two figures, is as mysterious as hieroglyphics yet as readable as a comic book. The importance of his work was recognized early in his career by Tony Shafrazi, who gave Haring his first riotously successful solo show in 1982. Between 1978 and his death in 1990, Haring was featured in over 100 group shows and individual exhibitions. As prolific as Alexander Calder or Pablo Picasso, he collaborated with a diverse canon of artists including Madonna, Andy Warhol, William Burroughs, Jenny Holzer and Yoko Ono. Haring was passionate about early childhood education, drug prevention, and safe sex. He made a tremendous impact through his public installations and service campaigns relating to these causes and countless others. In one sense, his murals and graffiti "tags" were didactic and straightforward. In another, they allowed the viewer to examine complicated visual narrative and understand the consequences of action and inaction through a distilled lens of abstracted figures. Haring never discounted the role of the viewer in his work; he enjoyed receiving feedback and having an open line of communication. It was this spirit of candor that allowed for community conference. During his short life, Haring completed more than 50 public projects in the non-profit and for-profit spaces, including his Crack is Whack mural on the FDR Drive in New York City, a mural painted on the western side of the Berlin Wall, and projects for Absolut Vodka and Swatch Watches. Haring uniquely combined his ardor to provide assistance to underserved communities with a keen awareness of both the art world elite and the commercial consumer. With the support of his friend Andy Warhol, he famously opened his Pop Shop in downtown Manhattan in 1986. His work was trading in galleries and slowly garnering a great deal of attention and his accessible subway drawings were being stolen and sold. Haring created a line of commercial goods for the shop, emblazoned with his famous babies and dogs, as a response to his work becoming "more expensive and more popular within the art market. Those prices meant that only people who could afford big art prices could have access to the work. The Pop Shop makes it accessible... [it] is totally in keeping ideologically with what Andy was doing and what conceptual artists and earth artists were doing: it was all about participation on a big level." 5 Large-scale participation and collaboration made Haring a well-established New York artist by the early 1980s, and he began receiving world-wide recognition. In 1984, John Buckley, the curator of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), invited Haring to Melbourne, Australia, where he completed a large-scale mural at Collingwood Technical College. Untitled (1984), was done during this historical visit. His sole public work outside of the Americas and Europe, the mural questions the human relationship to the computer and the impact rapidly changing technology would have upon the students of the Technical College. Untitled might be considered a thematic study for the mural. The swirling emblems and sunny bursts of orange speak to Melbourne's beach climate as well as the Aboriginal imagery Haring would have been exposed to in Australia. The gnome-like subject is a sort of hybrid: at once animal, human, and robot. Haring conveys the act of thought, be it programmed or organic. Is the subject's mental burst a product of his own thoughts or of his surroundings? In typical Haring fashion, it is up for a collective debate. Haring boldly acknowledged his HIV positive status, and used the guarantee of his imminent death as motivation. His commitment to change makes his work as relevant today as it was upon his creation. Constantly challenging the human condition, Haring explained that "all of the things that you make are a kind of quest for immortality. Because you're making these things that you know have a different kind of life. They don't depend on breathing, so they'll last longer than any of us will. Which is sort of an interesting idea, that it's sort of extending your life to some degree." 5 His life has undoubtedly been extended through his timeless imagery he will never cease inspire debate and change. 1. Jeffrey Deitch, Julia Gruen and Suzanne Geiss, Keith Haring , New York: Rizzoli, 2008, p. 296. 2. David Sheff, "Keith Haring, An Intimate Conversation," in Rolling Stone , issue 589, August 1989, p. 47. 3. Daniel Drenger, "Art and Life: An Interview with Keith Haring," in Columbia Art Review , Spring 1988, p. 49. 4. Sheff, p. 53. 5. Sheff, p. 52. 6. Drenger, p. 49.
Keith Haring - Kutztown Connection

Keith Haring - Kutztown Connection

Original 1984
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Net Price
Lot number: 106
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Description:
Description: KEITH HARING (american, 1958-1990)/span "KUTZTOWN CONNECTION" 1984, pencil signed and numbered 115 verso, with wide margins, The New Arts Program, New York, publisher and with their blindstamp and also with a letter on the reverse of the mount signed by the director of the New Arts Program stating this work is no. 115 of the signed edition of the poster. Offset lithographic poster on smooth wove paper. image: 21 1/2 x 18 1/2 in. (54.6 x 47cm) sheet: 33 1/16 x 20 in. (84 x 50.8cm) Condition Report: Indentations to paper in two places along bottom horizontal edge (approximately 2 1/4 in. and 1 3/4 in., respectively). 1/2 in. crease to the left of the blind stamp. 2 pin-prick size impressions at lower center between the columns of names. Soft scuffing in the black outline of the right foot of the figure. Soft handling creases. Held in place by four corners Descriptions provided in both printed and on-line catalogue formats do not include condition reports. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging. Interested bidders are strongly encouraged to request a condition report on any lots upon which they intend to bid, prior to placing a bid. All transactions are governed by Freeman's Conditions of Sale.
Keith Haring - Untitled

Keith Haring - Untitled

Original 1989
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Gross Price
Lot number: 166
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Keith Haring UNTITLED UNTITLED Earthenware vase painted black, 1989, signed in black marker, dedicated 'For Dorothy With Love + Respect - Keith XXX', dated, aside from the numbered edition of 25 (total edition includes five artist's proofs), the foundry's stamp in the inside of the ceramic overall: 11 3/8 by 9 1/2 in 290 by 242 mm
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