Keith Haring

United States (Cutztown 1958New York 1990 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Keith Haring
HARING Keith Self Portrait

Christie's /Nov 13, 2014
593,427.79 - 890,141.68
582,313.00

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Artworks in Arcadja
2811

Some works of Keith Haring

Extracted between 2,811 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Keith Haring - Untitled (free South Africa #3)

Keith Haring - Untitled (free South Africa #3)

Original 1985
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Lot number: 630
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Keith Haring (American, 1958–1990) Untitled (Free South Africa #3), 1985 Lithograph in colors (framed) Signed, dated and numbered A.P. 5/15 39 1/2" x 32" (sheet) Publisher: Edition Schellmann, New York Provenance: Martin Lawrence Gallery, New York Private Collection Condition Report: The work of art is in good condition. Signed, dated and numbered lower right side, recto. Minor buckling on all corners due to hinge mounts. Not examined out of the frame.
Keith Haring - The Kutztown Connection

Keith Haring - The Kutztown Connection

Original 1984
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Lot number: 55
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Keith Haring, Poster, The Kutztown Connection, 1984 Offset lithograph after a drawing on light cardboard USA, 1984 Keith Haring (1958-1990) – US-American Pop art artist Complimentary signature with red felt pen in the lower right in the image ‘K. Haring’’’’ Signed and dated in the print lower right ‘© K. HARING 84’’’’ Typographically inscribed ‘© 1984 New Arts Program’’’’ and ‘© 1984 Keith Haring’’’’ in the right margin With the blindstamp ‘NAP’’’’ Poster with letters of the Kutztown Connection, Kutztown In metal frame Image size: 55,3 x 47,5 cm The imaginative compositions by the American artist Keith Haring are deeply related to graffiti art and had a considerable effect on the art production of the 1980s; the auction record for a large-scale print by the artist is currently set at more than €79.000 Object is regular taxed. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Keith Haring grew up in Pennsylvania and refers with the present motif to a small town called ‘Kutztown’’’’, where he was born and raised. The figural composition reflects the artist’’’’s positive feelings and his strong sense of love for his happy childhood. The Kutztown University in Pennsylvania used the drawing origin from 1984 for the poster at hand, with which she campaigned in 1984 for performances to benefit her ‘New Arts Program’’’’. The offset lithograph is signed lower right in the image ‘K. Haring’’ ’’ and signed and dated in the plate ‘© K. HARING 84’’’’. It is typographically inscribed with the copyright of the new Arts Program and the artist. The sheet is in good condition. The frame is in good condition, too with slight signs of wear. The image measures 55.3 x 47.5 cm, the sheet 84 x 51 cm. The framed dimensions are 95 x 69 cm. Keith Haring (1958 1990) Born in Pennsylvania in 1958, Keith Haring started studying advertising, but then went on to study art at the School of Visual Arts in New York. During his studies he was highly influenced by the street art that was ever present wherever he would go. In the 1980s he focused on street art and painted walls in cities all over the world, such as Sydney, Rio de Janeiro and most of all New York. It was not until 1985 that Haring started incorporating canvas into his work. Keith Harings works can be found in some of the most famous collections world-wide. (fea)
Keith Haring - Untitled

Keith Haring - Untitled

Original 1989
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Lot number: 178
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Keith Haring Untitled , 1989 ink on terracotta vessel 9 1/4 x 28 1/2 x 28 1/2 in. (23.5 x 72.4 x 72.4 cm) Signed, numbered and dated "K. Haring 13/25 1989" on the underside. This work is number 13 from an edition of 25 plus 5 artist's proofs. Provenance Published by Monique Nellens and Gallery 121 Private Collection De Vuyst, Art Ancien, Moderne et Contemporain , October 27, 2012, lot 535 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner
Keith Haring - Self Portrait

Keith Haring - Self Portrait

Original 1989
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Lot number: 455
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Keith Haring (1958-1990) Self Portrait signed, numbered and dated 'K. Haring 1989 1/3' (on the base) painted steel 144 x 91 x 117 in. (365.8 x 231.1 x 297.2 cm.) Executed in 1989. This work is number one from an edition of three plus one artist's proof. André Emmerich Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1997 Basquiat and Haring: A Hurried Generation By Glenn O'Brien Keith Haring’’’’s career ended with his death at 31; Jean-Michel Basquiat’’’’s career ended with his death at 27. They were the most powerful artists of their generation and both produced a life’’’’s work in little more than a decade. Their intensity seemed fated, as if they knew they had only a few years to change the world. I met Basquiat when he was 18 years old and best known as the author of SAMO, the cryptic and clever graffiti that suddenly popped up around Manhattan, particularly in the art districts of SoHo and the East Village. Here was a guy doing something really different. This wasn’’’’t just a tag, a turf-signifying signature, this was comedic poetry, post-Zen koans and aphorisms of teenage prophesy. After a few weeks of hanging out, I also discovered that the guy was a real artist. Watching him draw was like watching Willie Mays bat or Dr. J dunk. It was no coincidence that he wasn’’’’ t tagging stations on the 6 train, but instead concentrating on Mercer, Greene, Wooster and West Broadway streets. He wasn’’’’t about going to the Bronx but about going to the top. One day, I guess it was 1980, I asked Basquiat who his favorite artist was and he said Haring. I had no idea who that was, but instead of explaining, he just brought him around to my weekly cable TV show, “TV Party.” I couldn’’’’t have been more surprised. It would have been hard to find someone who looked more the part of an innocent. He had a sweet, open, angelic baby face, curly already-receding hair, and he wore bright pink plastic glasses. He looked like someone Woody Allen might have cast to play a teen Woody, nerdy but also somehow blank and almost defiant. He was two and a half years older than Basquiat, but he looked even younger. Later I figured out that this kid was the one who was wheat-pasting provocatively funny collage posters up around the rock clubs, satires of The Daily News and New York Post headlines like: “Reagan Slain by Hero Cop” and “Mob Flees at Pope Rally.” At around the same time, Richard Hambleton was doing police-style chalk outlines on sidewalks covering the same turf. Apparently Haring first met Basquiat by accident at the School of Visual Arts, where Haring was a student. In an interview with Vince Aletti, Haring recalled: “SVA was where I met Kenny Scharf, where I met John Sex; it’’’’s actually where I met SAMO for the first time. I let him into the school without knowing who he was—because he was having trouble getting past the security guard at the front—and he asked me if I’’’’d walk him into the school, so I walked him in, and then later on I saw all this graffiti and found out he was the one who had done it.” That generation of New York artists—Basquiat, Haring, Scharf, Lenny McGurr aka “Futura 2000,” and Hambleton, as well as somewhat older artists like John Fekner—was certainly inspired by the graffiti scene, but what they were doing was more like unauthorized public art. It wasn’’’’t simply about marking out territory, about individuals saying “I’’’’m here” in a world of corporate signs; it was about making art for the great audience, the people on the streets, art that wasn’’’’t a monument to a war hero, or an abstract sculpture funded by a bank, but post-Pop popular art. It often had a message and a political dimension, like the May ’’’’68 posters of Atelier Populaire, but first of all it was art. Hambleton’’’’s anthropomorphic black shadows were painted on walls along streets that were still dangerous, and they could throw a chill up the spine as you turned a corner. Haring’’’’s subway chalk drawings provided a noncommercial, populist form of delight for MTA riders. While Basquiat quit working outside with a bang, writing “SAMO IS DEAD,” Haring continued making his subway drawings into 1985 when he had been represented by the Tony Shafrazi Gallery for three years, and had mounted one-man shows in Rotterdam, Tokyo, Naples, Antwerp, London, Cologne, Milan, Basel and Munich, including a solo show of large steel sculptures at Leo Castelli’’’’s gallery. Haring was committed to erasing the distinction between high and low art, but he tired of having his subway drawings “collected” almost as soon as they appeared, and he had been arrested several times making them. In 1986, he opened the Pop Shop on Lafayette Street which sold his art and products he designed. He said, “My shop is an extension of what I was doing in the subway stations, breaking down the barriers between high and low art.” While Basquiat may seem to have taken the high road, and Haring tried to navigate the tricky territory between major gallery artist and multiples entrepreneur, both artists were keen to have a broad audience and engage their generational peers. Basquiat gave up writing on the walls before Haring, probably because he sensed that what happened to black graffiti artist Michael Stewart, who died at the hands of the police, could easily happen to him. Haring produced events at Club 57 and curated the gallery space at the Mudd Club. He also created and distributed thousands of anti-nuke posters and designed fabric for designer Vivienne Westwood. He created dozens of indoor and outdoor murals; he created TV spots and stage sets for theater, film, video and dance. He painted a large mural for the Palladium nightclub. He collaborated with such diverse artists as Bill T. Jones, Robert Mapplethorpe, Brion Gysin, Jenny Holzer, Duran Duran and Run DMC. Basquiat made postcards and sold them on the street, hawked a line of hand-painted clothes under the name MANMADE, and created multiples, including the Anatomy series; he starred in the film Downtown 81, created an MTV video, illustrated a children’’’’s book written by Maya Angelou and like Haring executed a large mural at the Palladium nightclub; he fronted his own band and produced a seminal hip-hop record. Basquiat DJ’’’’d regularly at the nightclub Area where Haring also painted a skateboard ramp. Both artists were workaholics, creating in vastly diverse media virtually nonstop. Their lives were work. I don’’’’t believe it had anything to do with ambition per se, or greed, or any kind of obsessive compulsive mental states, but with an almost magical desire to reclaim the power of the visual artist with the public. It’’’’s no coincidence that both became close with the idol Andy Warhol, because he was another relentless worker who ranged seamlessly from painting, sculpture and prints, to film, video, theater and publishing, but also because Warhol seemed to want to make art itself bigger—to achieve the level of influence by the pop stars he knew like the Beatles and the Stones. It might have been expected that the 20-something artists sought out an artist old enough to be their father who came closer than any other Pop artist to making truly popular art. What wasn’’’’t expected was that in the end Warhol would be more influenced by Haring and Basquiat than they were by him. The pupils became the master’’’’s master. Warhol, a great draughtsman, had virtually given up drawing until Haring and Basquiat harangued and mocked him into once again showing his hand, which he did with spectacular results in his final bodies of work. Today, Haring and Basquiat are revered as masters and their work is highly coveted, but more than that they got what they really wanted: a mass public. They not only changed the art world, creating and opening for outsiders with vision; they changed the world’’’’s consciousness across a spectrum—from sexual identity to black history. They made art that was educated and political but also stunningly captivating to the eye. They made art that was as big as rock, and they did it for the people, for the kids, and it’’’’ s still radiating decades later. From the Collection of a Private Bank New York, André Emmerich Gallery, Keith Haring on Park Avenue: An Exhibition of the Public Art Fund, June-October 1997, pp. 16-17 (another example exhibited and illustrated). Art Gallery of Hamilton Ontario, Irving Zucker Sculpture Garden (another example on view).
Keith Haring - Untitled

Keith Haring - Untitled

Original 1982
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Lot number: 233
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Keith Haring 1958 - 1990 UNTITLED signed and dated AUG 11-82 on the reverse watercolor on paper 50 by 38 in. 127 by 96.5 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Barbara Guggenheim Associates Inc., New York Acquired by the present owner from the above in September 1982 Exhibited New York, Alona Kagan Gallery, Keith Haring: Drawing, May - June 2006 “You draw fast…It goes quickly and there is no time to worry about it…It is possible to reach the highest levels of instantaneous reponse recorded in spontaneous method and representative of purest thought when you are working with the knowledge that the work you create is temporary, insignificant in a broader sense, significant in an immediate sense, a perfect representation of time passing, time existing…Primal response.” Keith Haring, 1978 This work is in very good condition overall. The lateral edges are deckled, and there is a slight undulation to the sheet, inherent to the artist's working method. There are several artist's pinholes in each corner. There is an approximately 1-inch crease to the bottom right edge near the corner. There are 2 pinpoint media accretions along the left lateral border, possibly from the time of execution. Upon very close inspection, there are some light, pinpoint accretions. The sheet is hinged verso along the top edge to the matte. Framed under Plexiglas. In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
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