Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Giannoulis Halepas

Greece (1851 -  1938 )
HALEPAS Giannoulis The Story Of Sleeping Beauty

Sotheby's
Nov 11, 2008
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Giannoulis Halepas at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Giannoulis Halepas, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Thanos Tsingos, Aphrodite Liti, Photes Kontoglou, Giorgios Mavroidis, Marianthi Kapantai-Patsi, Lina Bebi, Théodore Scaramanga Ralli
Artworks in Arcadja
14

Some works of Giannoulis Halepas

Extracted between 14 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Giannoulis Halepas -  Woman With Chicken

Giannoulis Halepas - Woman With Chicken

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 19
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Yiannoulis Halepas (Greek, 1851-1938)

(a) Woman with chicken
plaster
41 x 17 x 23 cm.

(b) Four drawings
three of them inscribed with the title
pencil and charcoal on paper
27 x 19.5 cm., 27.5 x 20 cm., 27.5 x 20 cm., 27.5 x 20 cm.
(5)

Footnotes

(a) Executed c. 1924-1927.

Provenance
Andreas Antonopoulos collection, Athens, and thence by descent to the current owner.
Giannoulis Halepas - The Story Of Sleeping Beauty

Giannoulis Halepas - The Story Of Sleeping Beauty

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 12
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
THE STORY OF SLEEPING BEAUTY
MEASUREMENTS
h.: 64cm., 25¼in.
DESCRIPTION
incised with signature on the base
plaster
PROVENANCE
Estate of the artistPrivate Collection, Athens
EXHIBITED
Athens, National Sculpture Gallery, Yiannoulis Halepas:Retrospective Exhibition, February - September 2007
LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Marinos Kalligas, Yannoulis Halepas, Athens, 1972, pp. 35, 47,55 & 66, discussed; p. 88, catalogued; nos. 132-34, illustrated(as La Belle au bois dormant IV)
CATALOGUE NOTE
Executed in 1932, The subject of the present work is the storyof La Belle au bois dormant (Sleeping Beauty
). Afairy tale written by the French writer Charles Perrault in 1697.The many subsequent variants published include that of the BrothersGrimm of 1812. The subject of Sleeping Beauty was treated byHalepas as early in his career as 1874, and the present work,executed six years before his death, would be the finaldemonstration of this fascination.Halepas depicts the moment at which the princess, cursed to sleepfor one hundred years, is awakened by a passing prince, struck byher beauty. The artist captures the calm that pervades theprincess' cursed kingdom, heavy with slumber. The Prince's kissoccurs at the pinnacle of the triangular form, a small cherub,symbol of love, is seated discreetly beneath the lovers.This sculpture was executed in the final, third phase of Halepas'life when he was living with his niece and nephew Irene and BasileHalepas in Athens in 1930. The artist's isolation and celibacy, wasa consequence of his physical and mental health, and added acertain longing and intensity to works such as the present. Thevoluptuousness of the princess is tempered by the tenderness withwhich the prince embraces her.
Giannoulis Halepas - Seated Angel (recto); Another Version Of Thesame Subject (verso)

Giannoulis Halepas - Seated Angel (recto); Another Version Of Thesame Subject (verso)

Original 1930
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 78
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Seated angel (recto); Another version of thesame subject (verso)
signed in Greek and dated '1930' (lower left)
charcoal on paper
Provenance:
Katerina Halepa-Katsatou, the artist’s granddaughter.
Private collection, Athens.
Exhibited:
Athens, National Gallery and Alexander Soutzos Museum, Drawings ofYiannoulis Helepas, 1981, no 51.
Literature:
Dimitris Papastamos,
Drawings of Yiannoulis Halepas
,National Gallery and Alexander Soutzos Museum, Athens 1981, p. 180,no. 405 & 407 (illustrated, also cover B').
Giannoulis Halepas - Springtime

Giannoulis Halepas - Springtime

Original 1937
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 95
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
inscribed and dated
1937
on the base

plaster

Yannoulis Halepas was the son of a marble cutter and sculptor from Tinos. Born on an island with a considerable artistic tradition (for centuries, the island's villages had been home to the best craftsmen and marble sculptors in Greece), he left Tinos in 1869 to study sculpture at the School of Fine Arts in Athens under Leonidas Drossis. From 1873 to 1876 he continued his studies at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Max von Windmann, having obtained a scholarship from the religious foundation of the Annunciation of Tinos. Having won several medals for his work at the academy, he returned to Athens in 1876 and produced some highly acclaimed finished classicist marble sculptures, including
Sleeping Girl
of 1878 (Athens, First Cemetery, Tomb of Sophia Afentakis). In such works as this the classical references are evident in the treatment of anatomical detail and drapery, while in other works, such as
Filostorgia
of 1875 (Tinos, Museum of Tinian Artists) they are apparent in a more austere form.

In 1878, a nervous breakdown and subsequent suicide attempt heralded a prolonged mental illness which forced Halepas to interrupt his work until 1918, the year his mother died. After two stays in mental asylums, Halepas' mother had been looking after him at home, and made sure he would not take up working as a sculptor again, as she believed this was causing his mental distress.

Halepas's late works, created after his illness, established him as one of the most important sculptors of his generation. While his themes remained essentially the same, his style changed dramatically. He produced rough clay moulds and plaster casts rather than highly finished marbles, and became more interested in conveying the inner strength of works than the surface sculptural qualities, creating emotionally charged works of art, such as the present work.

Casts of Halepas's sculptures were brought to Athens from Tinos, and an exhibition of his work was held in 1925 at the Academy of Athens, which also awarded him the Arts Distinction in 1927. His isolation and illness prevented any real contact with contemporary artists and trends. Despite this, Halepas's romantic use of myth inspired a move towards Expressionism in Greek sculpture.

From 1930 until his death in 1938 Halepas lived with his niece and nephew in Athens. The last eight years of his life were the most prolific period of his artistic career. He executed numerous sculptures and drawings during this time. Only few of these survived, due in part to their fragility, but also because Halepas destroyed the majority of his late works himself.

The present work was executed in 1937, a year before Halepas's demise, and until recently remained in the collection of the Halepas family. Depicting a voluptuous nude holding a rose to her bosom in classical, sensual pose, Halepas created an allegory and celebration of spring and youth, which was in direct contrast to the closing of his cycle of life.
Giannoulis Halepas - Angel

Giannoulis Halepas - Angel

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 28
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
incised with signature beneath the base

plaster, with terracotta coloured patina

PROVENANCEDimitris Kallonas, Athens
LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Marinos Kalligas, Yanoulis Halepas, sa vie et son
oeuvre, Athens, 1972, no. 67 (another example illustrated)
CATALOGUE NOTE
Yannoulis Halepas was the son of a marble cutter and sculptor
from Tinos. Born on an island with a considerable artistic
tradition (for centuries, the island's villages had been home to
the best craftsmen and marble sculptors in Greece), he left Tinos
in 1869 to study sculpture at the School of Fine Arts in Athens
under Leonidas Drossis. From 1873 to 1876 he continued his studies
at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Max von
Windmann, having obtained a scholarship from the religious
foundation of the Annunciation of Tinos. Having won several medals
for his work at the academy, he returned to Athens in 1876 and
produced some highly acclaimed finished classicist marble
sculptures, including Sleeping Girl of 1878 (Athens, First
Cemetery, Tomb of Sophia Afentakis). In such works as this the
classical references are evident in the treatment of anatomical
detail and drapery, while in other works, such as
Filostorgia of 1875 (Tinos, Museum of Tinian Artists) they
are apparent in a more austere form. In 1878, a nervous breakdown and subsequent suicide attempt
heralded a prolonged mental illness which forced Halepas to
interrupt his work until 1918, the year his mother died. After two
stays in mental asylums, Halepas? mother had been looking after him
at home, and made sure he would not take up working as a sculptor
again, as she believed this was causing his mental distress. Halepas's late works, created after his illness, established him as
one of the most important sculptors of his generation. While his
themes remained essentially the same, his style changed
dramatically. He produced rough clay moulds and plaster casts
rather than highly finished marbles, and became more interested in
conveying the inner strength of works than their surfaces'
sculptural qualities, creating emotionally charged works of art,
such as the present work. The present plaster cast is one of a
small edition known to survive: only four others are listed by
Kalligas in his monograph on the sculptor. It displays the original
mould marks from when the cast was taken from the original
model. Casts of Halepas?s sculptures were brought to Athens from Tinos,
and an exhibition of his work was held in 1925 at the Academy of
Athens, which also awarded him the Arts Distinction in 1927. His
isolation and illness prevented any real contact with contemporary
artists and trends. Despite this, Halepas?s romantic use of myth
inspired a move towards Expressionism in Greek sculpture. From 1930 until his death in 1938 Halepas lived with his niece and
nephew in Athens. The last eight years of his life were the most
prolific period of his artistic career. He executed numerous
sculptures and drawings during this time. Only few of these
survived, due in part to their fragility, but also because Halepas
destroyed the majority of his late works himself.
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr