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Jean-Leon Gerome

(1824 -  1904 ) Wikipedia® : Jean-Leon Gerome
GEROME Jean-Leon  Diane Et Actéon

Christie's /May 23, 2017
134,783.00 - 224,638.33
Not Sold

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Variants on Artist's name :

Gérome Jean-Léon

Gérôme Jean-Léon

Gérôme Jean-Léon

 

Artworks in Arcadja
353

Some works of Jean-Leon Gerome

Extracted between 353 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jean-Leon Gerome -  The Mandolin Player

Jean-Leon Gerome - The Mandolin Player

Original 1858
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Price:

Lot number: 54
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Description:
Jean-Léon Gérôme (French, 1824-1904) The Mandolin Player signed and dated \\\‘J.L. GEROME/1858.\\\’ (centre left) oil on canvas 16 ¼ x 11 3/8 in. (41.2 x 29 cm.) Gérôme was an indefatigable traveller. He seemed always to be on the go, even into his seventies. They were often long trips, sometimes of several months. One wonders how he got so much work done. When his studio assistant, the sculptor Decorchemont, suggested he should slow down a bit, he replied, 'You really think that I have the time to slow down at my age?' Gérôme's most important teacher was Paul Delaroche (1797-1856), who was a supreme master of stance, posture, placement and contrapposto. Delaroche taught Gérôme how to see and project the frame and muscles under the skin and clothing of figures to show the tensions of the inner balance that supported a pose. It is that developed talent which underlies the strong presence of the figure in this picture. From the 1870s single-figures in Oriental costumes and settings becomes a steady part of Gérôme's production. The present figure can be identified as an Arnaut, a term often used for an Albanian soldier, an irregular soldier in the Turkish army. They were recognisable by their pleated skirts, somewhat of a national Albanian costume. After Egypt became independent from Turkey, there were evidently plenty of them in Cairo who earned a living by various jobs: as guards, animal keepers, and models for foreign painters. Gérôme's first oriental costume picture was of an Arnaut in bright sunlight with a rifle on his shoulder, leading a corvé of recruits across the desert, perhaps for service in the army or for work on the Suez canal. It is carefully painted, with strong plein air effects -- particularly complex on the Arnaut's skirt; for this difficult effect, Gérôme worked from a photograph of the skirt shot on a sunlit roof, perhaps that of his own house. In its simple, straightforward subject matter -- with neither a story nor a moral -- this is a modest work; but it perfectly illustrates the attention to detail that defined the artist as an 'ethnographic' Orientalist painter, and is animated by the engaging pose of the figure. This, combined with the finesse of the detailing are familiar properties in Gérôme's studio collection, with loving attention paid to the silvered decoration on the pistol handle and the glints of light on the copper of the hookah. The costume gets great attention too; the colourful shawl banded on the soldier's head, the especially fine sheen of the sleeves and the pleated Arnaut skirt, which the painter never failed to draw and paint freshly throughout his life, always with a different fall of the pleats, and different modulations of light and shadow on the multitudinous folds. We are grateful to Graydon Parrish for his assistance in authenticating and cataloguing the present lot.
Jean-Leon Gerome - La Femme Au Voile

Jean-Leon Gerome - La Femme Au Voile

Original 0195
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Lot number: 1075
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Lot# 1075 Jean Leon Gerome (1824-1904 French) "La Femme Au Voile", standing woman with veil Gilt and polychrome-patinated bronze Signed to base: J. L. Gerome, stamped verso: 0195, with circular foundry mark: Siot Decauville / Fondeur / Paris 33.75" H x 16" W x 8.25" D est: : Private Estate, Southern California. Condition: Overall good condition with scattered scuffs, scratches, wear and abrasions to patination commensurate with age.
Jean-Leon Gerome - French Bethsabée

Jean-Leon Gerome - French Bethsabée

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 17
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Description:
Jean-Léon Gérôme FRENCH BETHSABÉE 1824 - 1904 signed J.L.GEROME lower left oil on canvas 60.5 by 100cm., 23¾ by 39¼in. Eugène Lyon, Brussels (sale: Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 7 May 1903, lot 16) Antonin Mercié (sale: Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 18 December 1918, lot 13) Yvonne Coty, Paris Sale: Sotheby's, New York, 28 February 1990, lot 29 Private collection (sale: Sotheby's, London, 14 June 2005, lot 104) Purchased at the above sale Fanny Field Hering, The Life and Work of Jean-Léon Gérôme, New York, 1892, p. 274, illustrated opposite p. 212 Albert Soubies, J.-L. Gérôme: souvenirs et notes, Paris, 1904, p. 9 Gerald M. Ackerman, The Life and Work of Jean-Léon Gérôme with a Catalogue Raisonné, London, 1986, p. 262, no. 355, catalogued Gerald M. Ackerman, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Monographie révisée, Catalogue raisonné mis à jour, Paris, 2000, p. 320, no. 355, catalogued; p. 321, illustrated 'And it came to pass in an eveningtide, that David arose from his bed, and walked upon the roof of the king's house, and from the roof he saw a woman washing herself; and the woman was very beautiful to look upon' (II Samuel 11:2) These evocative opening lines of the Old Testament story of David and Bathsheba have found expression in Western Art through the centuries. Blending the Biblical subject with a masterful exploration of light and the human form, Gérôme's interpretation of the story belongs to his most important works. Compelling though the story is, Gérôme's interest lay not only in its dramatic narrative. Rather, it provided the perfect pretext for exploring the female form in natural light outside of the studio. The figure of Bathsheba, 'a marvel of plastic grace and delicate flesh-tints' (Hering, p. 274), is in essence like a bather from Gérôme's numerous interior bath scenes (fig. 1) transposed into plein air. The topography in the painting is left deliberately vague, the city of Jerusalem depicted as an imaginary, generic middle-eastern skyline. The real focus of the painting is the figure's contrapposto pose, the effect of the light on her delicate white skin, and the minutely observed fabrics draped over the stool and worn by Bathsheba's attendant. Bethsabée was in fact painted at Bougival in 1889 where Gérôme worked 'on the roof of his summer atelier, enabling him to pose his model in the open air and obtain wonderful atmospheric effects' (op cit). Bathsheba was the wife of the Hittite Uriah, who served under Joab in King David's army. Uriah is away fighting a battle when David first spies Bathsheba from his palace. He sends messengers to find her. She goes to him, sleeps with him, and conceives his child. To conceal his sin, David recalls Uriah from battle, ostensibly to hear how the war is going, but actually to encourage him to sleep with his wife. Uriah renounces the opportunity out of conscience towards his fellow soldiers battling it out in the field, choosing instead to sleep before the gates of the king's palace. David now changes tack, instructing Joab to ensure Uriah fall on the battlefield, which he does. Bathsheba mourns her husband, then becomes David's wife, and duly bears him a son. However, Nathan prophesies that God will punish David for his sins and that his child will die. David fasts and does penance, but the child dies of illness. Having been punished, David and Bathsheba have another child, Solomon, the future king. The preparatory oil sketch, compositionally similar to the finished version but without the shrubs and flowers, and measuring 60 by 98cm, was sold at Sotheby's New York on 24 May 1995, lot 95. In 1896, Gérôme modelled a sculpture on the Bathsheba in his painting. The life-size plaster version is now lost, known only from photographs (fig. 2). A polychrome plaster version (73cm in height) is in a French private collection, while a gilt bronze version 32 cm high is in the Cumner Art Gallery, Jacksonville, Florida. Jean-Léon Gérôme, The Great Bath at Bursa (detail), oil on canvas, sold Sotheby\\\’s London, 15 June 2004
Jean-Leon Gerome -  Diane Et Actéon

Jean-Leon Gerome - Diane Et Actéon

Original 1895
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Lot number: 41
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Description:
Jean-Léon Gérôme (French, 1824-1904) Diane et Actéon signed 'J. L. Gerome' (lower left) oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 39 3/8 in. (64.1 x 100 cm.) Painted in 1895. Ovid\\\’s Metamorphoses seem to have held a particular fascination for Gérôme during the first half of the 1890s. Between 1890 and 1892, Gérôme made both painted and sculpted variations on the theme of Pygmalion and Galatea, including the version now preserved in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (fig. 1), and also the present painting, which draws inspiration from Book III of Ovid\\\’s text. The myth tells of the hunter Actaeon accidentally surprising Diana, the virgin goddess of the hunt, while she and her nymphs are bathing. While the nymphs and Diana frantically try to cover her nakedness, the resultant splashing transforms the hunter into a stag, and he is later tracked and killed by his own dogs, unable to recognize their master. Rather than falling back on older models for depicting this story – either just showing the moment at which Acteon surprises Diana, or adding a twist on that idea by showing Acteon beginning to grow antlers while surprising Diana – Gérôme has instead taken a wholly new approach to the composition by compressing the story into a single narrative and uniting the composition around the single moment of greatest action. As the hunting party and dogs at left follow in hot pursuit of the stag, the beast is depicted splashing down into the water, seemingly mid-transformation. This commotion has roused the figures in the foreground, Diana and her nymphs as well as some unsuspecting ducks, to action, fleeing from this sudden and violent interruption of their solitude and frantically gathering their clothing. In addition to bringing his own twist to the story of Diana and Actaeon, the picture also afforded Gérôme the continued opportunity to demonstrate his brilliance in painting the nude female form. The landscape in the present painting seems to have been inspired by the landscape around the Bois de Saint Cucufa west of Paris, which Gerome visited several times during this same time period. The occasion for these visits is unclear, but the area\\\’s rolling hills, verdant forest, and lily-padded pond recur in both the present work and several others from these same years – Léda et le cygne (1896), Solitude (1896) and Les Étangs de Saint-Cucufa (1896). We are grateful to Graydon Parrish for confirming the authenticity of this work. (fig. 1) Jean-Léon Gérôme, Pygmalion and Galatea, circa 1890. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Jean-Leon Gerome - La Joueuse De Boules (the Boules Player)

Jean-Leon Gerome - La Joueuse De Boules (the Boules Player)

Original
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Lot number: 219
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Description:
Jean-Léon Gérôme French, 1824 - 1904 LA JOUEUSE DE BOULES (THE BOULES PLAYER) signed J L. GEROME and with foundry inscription SIOT PARIS and numbered 845 H gilt bronze height 34 1/2 in. 87 cm Literature G. Ackerman, The Life and Work of Jean-Léon Gérôme, London and New York, 1986, p.326 Catalogue Note Gérôme exhibited his Joueuse de Boules in the Salon of 1902. He used an invented Néo-Grec ball game to twist and display the nude female form as the woman attempts to drop the balls into the mouths of the masks on the base without moving her feet. Her contorted pose echoes that of the antique Satyr Examining his Tail in the Vatican Museums. According to Ackerman, the Joueuse was edited in bronze in three sizes by the Siot-Decauville foundry, with this being the largest.  A gilt-bronze version of the smaller size is in the Hirshorn Museum, Washington DC.
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