Derek George M. Gardner

United Kingdom (19142007 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Derek George M. Gardner
GARDNER Derek George M. The Battle Of Trafalgar – H.m.s.

Bonhams /Sep 26, 2012
31,243.36 - 37,492.03
Not disclosed

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Artworks in Arcadja
62

Some works of Derek George M. Gardner

Extracted between 62 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Derek George M. Gardner - A Fierce Engagement Between The H.m.s.penguin And The French Corvette Oiseau

Derek George M. Gardner - A Fierce Engagement Between The H.m.s.penguin And The French Corvette Oiseau

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Lot number: 34
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Derek George Montague Gardner, R.S.M.A. (Gerrards Cross 1914-2007) A fierce engagement between the H.M.S. Penguin and the French corvette Oiseau on 21 s t August 1797 signed 'Derek G.M./GARDNER' (lower right) oil on canvas 24 x 36 in. (61 x 91.5 cm.) with P. Polak, London. The 16-gun sloop, H.M.S. Penguin was built in Amsterdam and launched in 1789 as the Dutch brig Komeet. Captured by H.M.S. Unicorn off the Irish coast on 28th August 1795, Komeet was renamed Penguin and saw active service in the British Navy for most of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars before being sold in July 1809. On 21st August 1797, under the command of Captain John King Pulling, Penguin was sailing off the Irish coast when at 8.30am. Pulling sighted two vessels sailing towards him, looking initially like harmless cruisers. However, as the ships came nearer it became apparent that despite the foremost flying English colours they were both in fact enemy vessels. Penguin immediately opened fire, and after 15 minutes continuous fighting the stern vessel struck her colours and hove-to, but as the sea was running too high to take immediate possession of her Pulling decided to pursue the escaping privateer, the 18-gun French corvette Oiseau, which he had ascertained to be the bigger prize. She had in fact outsailed the Royal Navy on five previous occasions, and despite the French boat's superiority in canvas, Penguin managed to keep up the pursuit and after an hour and forty minutes, Oiseau surrendered after having lost her main topmast. Pulling in a letter two days later to Vice-Admiral Kingsmill, Commander-in-Chief of the Navy in Ireland, published in the London Gazette in September 1797, credited some of his success to the Oiseau's disorder and the rough seas. He also praised his men, especially his First Lieutenant, Mr George Neat Tremlett, for 'their Zeal and steady Exertion during the Chace, working the Guns Knee high in Water for upwards of an Hour and an Half, carrying a great Press of Sail, with a heavy Sea, making fair Breaches constantly over us'. Having taken possession of Oiseau by 12.30pm., Pulling returned for the other ship, who by this time was trying to make her escape. He succeeded in catching her and when he came to take possession he discovered she was in fact the brig Express of Dartmouth, only recently herself the prize of Oiseau, and outbound for Newfoundland. Ironically Express had only been captured by the Royal Navy a few months previously, prior to that she had been the 12-gun French privateer Appocrate. Although a minor incident in the overall catalogue of actions during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, it perfectly illustrates the day-to-day activities of the Navies of the warring nations during this period, which involved small skirmishes and the requisition of prizes into the service of the victorious side's Navy, rather than the large battles that are more commonly remembered by history.
Derek George M. Gardner - H.m.s. Furious Outward Bound On The Clyde

Derek George M. Gardner - H.m.s. Furious Outward Bound On The Clyde

Original 1943
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Net Price
Lot number: 332
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‡Derek George Montague Gardner (1917-2007) H.M.S. Furious outward bound on the Clyde Signed and dated 1943, also inscribed verso including Admiralty permissions Watercolour 24.5 x 34.5cm; 9½ x 13¾in Provenance: Woolley & Wallis 5/10/05, Lot 138 ++Some restoration, a little discoloured
Derek George M. Gardner - An 80-gun Ship-of-the-line, Probably Nelson's

Derek George M. Gardner - An 80-gun Ship-of-the-line, Probably Nelson's

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Lot number: 143
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Derek George Montague Gardner (British, 1914-2007) An 80-gun ship-of-the-line, probably Nelson's Foudroyant , at the head of her squadron signed and dated 'Derek G. M. Gardner 1975' (lower right) pencil and watercolour heightened with white 37 x 51cm (14 9/16 x 20 1/16in). 'Nelson's ships in the Mediterranean, 1798. Theseus 74, Orion 74, Culloden 74, Goliath 74, Vanguard 74, and Mutine 18 gun brig. Flying the flag of the Rear Admiral of the Blue'
Derek George M. Gardner - The Battle Of Trafalgar – H.m.s.

Derek George M. Gardner - The Battle Of Trafalgar – H.m.s.

Original 1965
Estimate:

Price: Not disclosed
Lot number: 132
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Description:
Derek George Montague Gardner (British, 1914-2007) The battle of Trafalgar – H.M.S. Victory and H.M.S. Téméraire in close action with the French Rédoubtable , the Spanish four-decker Santisima Trinidad sailing ahead off Victory 's port bow signed 'Derek G.M. Gardner' and dated 1965 (lower right) oil on canvas 76.2 x 101.6cm (30 x 40in). The incident depicted here took place straight after the opening encounter at Trafalgar (for which see John Steven Dews's portrayal in lot 154) and in it, Gardner has painted a stunning evocation of how a really 'close action' must have seemed to those who took part in it. Notwithstanding Victory 's assault on Rédoubtable 's port side, the furious broadside from Téméraire 's port guns suggests an inferno of epic proportions and it was little wonder that, when Rédoubtable eventually struck her colours, she was – in her own captain's words – 'so riddled that she seemed to be no more than a mass of wreckage.' She had endured the most devastating and unequal exchange of broadsides in the entire battle and sustained very heavy casualties as a result. Despite the damage, she was – as a relatively new '74' – still a valuable prize and in the violent storm which followed the battle, the crew of H.M.S. Swiftsure made the most strenuous efforts to save her as well as those members of her crew still aboard the doomed ship. In the event, after five hours of unremitting effort, Rédoubtable sank at 10.15pm. on 22nd October with a total loss of some 487 men either killed in the battle or drowned when she foundered. The Téméraire at Trafalgar was the second vessel of this name to serve in the Royal Navy. Laid down at Chatham and launched in September 1798, she was a large second rate of 98-guns and, like Rédoubtable , took a tremendous battering at Trafalgar and barely survived the subsequent storm which sank so many of the captured prizes. Despite her survival however, she was deemed unfit for further service at sea and was relegated to harbour duties. Ending her days at Sheerness, she was sold for breaking in 1838 and, whilst under tow to Rotherhithe, found immortality when she inspired J.M.W. Turner to paint her passing in his celebrated 'Fighting Téméraire '.
Derek George M. Gardner - The Battle Of Trafalgar – H.m.s.

Derek George M. Gardner - The Battle Of Trafalgar – H.m.s.

Original 1965
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 132
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Derek George Montague Gardner (British, 1914-2007) The battle of Trafalgar – H.M.S. Victory and H.M.S. Téméraire in close action with the French Rédoubtable , the Spanish four-decker Santisima Trinidad sailing ahead off Victory 's port bow signed 'Derek G.M. Gardner' and dated 1965 (lower right) oil on canvas 76.2 x 101.6cm (30 x 40in). The incident depicted here took place straight after the opening encounter at Trafalgar (for which see John Steven Dews's portrayal in lot 154) and in it, Gardner has painted a stunning evocation of how a really 'close action' must have seemed to those who took part in it. Notwithstanding Victory 's assault on Rédoubtable 's port side, the furious broadside from Téméraire 's port guns suggests an inferno of epic proportions and it was little wonder that, when Rédoubtable eventually struck her colours, she was – in her own captain's words – 'so riddled that she seemed to be no more than a mass of wreckage.' She had endured the most devastating and unequal exchange of broadsides in the entire battle and sustained very heavy casualties as a result. Despite the damage, she was – as a relatively new '74' – still a valuable prize and in the violent storm which followed the battle, the crew of H.M.S. Swiftsure made the most strenuous efforts to save her as well as those members of her crew still aboard the doomed ship. In the event, after five hours of unremitting effort, Rédoubtable sank at 10.15pm. on 22nd October with a total loss of some 487 men either killed in the battle or drowned when she foundered. The Téméraire at Trafalgar was the second vessel of this name to serve in the Royal Navy. Laid down at Chatham and launched in September 1798, she was a large second rate of 98-guns and, like Rédoubtable , took a tremendous battering at Trafalgar and barely survived the subsequent storm which sank so many of the captured prizes. Despite her survival however, she was deemed unfit for further service at sea and was relegated to harbour duties. Ending her days at Sheerness, she was sold for breaking in 1838 and, whilst under tow to Rotherhithe, found immortality when she inspired J.M.W. Turner to paint her passing in his celebrated 'Fighting Téméraire '.
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